September 1 (71)

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September 1 (71)

  1. 1. September 1, 2011<br />
  2. 2. Register Your clicker for the semester<br />
  3. 3. “Good Grammar Gets the Girl”<br />
  4. 4. “Good Grammar Gets the Girl”<br />
  5. 5. “Good Grammar Gets the Girl”<br />
  6. 6. Annotations<br />What to Annotate in a Text<br />Memorable statements or important points<br />Key terms or concepts<br />Central issues or themes<br />Examples that support a main point<br />Unfamiliar words<br />Questions you have about a point or passage<br />Your responses to a specific point or passage<br />
  7. 7. Subjects<br />
  8. 8. Prepositional Phrases<br />A prepositional phrase consists of a preposition and its object. <br />The object is a noun or a pronoun, together with any words that describe or refer to the object.<br />
  9. 9. Activity 3: Write Prepositional Phrases<br />Isaac bought his computer __________________________.<br />My humanities group meets _________________.<br />Songs ____________ are very popular.<br />The children ate the cookies that they found ______________.<br />When the power failed, I was ________________.<br />before the big sale<br />after class<br />about love<br />on the counter<br />in the attic <br />
  10. 10. Activity 3: Write Prepositional Phrases<br />Before the concert<br />_________________, James practiced his guitar.<br />_________________, the mechanic repaired the van.<br />Zaini caught the bus ___________.<br />The sparrows flew _____________________.<br />Everyone walked home _______________.<br />During the storm<br />at the mall<br />over the power lines<br />after the recital<br />
  11. 11. Prepositional Phrases<br />A prepositional phrase cannot be the subject of a sentence.<br />You can cross out prepositional phrases to help you figure out the subject of a sentence.<br />
  12. 12. Prepositional Phrases<br />The doctor from next door bandaged my knee.<br />Circle prepositions.<br />Line out the prepositional phrase.<br />Now decide who or what is doing something or being something.<br />The doctor is the subject because <br />he is doing the bandaging.<br />
  13. 13. Prepositional Phrases<br />The girl in the doorway looks like my niece.<br />Circle prepositions.<br />Line out the prepositional phrase.<br />Now decide who or what is doing something or being something.<br />The girl is the subject because <br />she is looking.<br />
  14. 14. Prepositional Phrases<br />The bell on the steeple of the church rang three times.<br />Circle prepositions.<br />Line out the prepositional phrase.<br />Now decide who or what is doing something or being something.<br />The bell is the subject because <br />it is doing the ringing.<br />
  15. 15. Prepositional Phrases<br />One of my favorite comic strips in the Sunday paper is Peanuts.<br />Without using the process, what do you think is the subject of this sentence?<br />One<br />Comic strips<br />Sunday paper<br />Peanuts<br />
  16. 16. Prepositional Phrases<br />One of my favorite comic strips in the Sunday paper is Peanuts.<br />Circle prepositions.<br />Line out the prepositional phrase.<br />Now decide who or what is doing something or being something.<br />One is the subject because <br />it is being something.<br />
  17. 17. Activity 4: Identify Prepositional Phrases<br />The tenants down the hall are seldom home.<br />Darryl bought a used car for three thousand dollars.<br />The flowers in that yard need to be watered.<br />After the midterm, the biology class became more difficult.<br />Inside those boxes, you will find my old textbooks.<br />
  18. 18. Activity 4: Identify Prepositional Phrases<br />The guests at the party appreciated the DJ.<br />Without his friends, Rashid felt somewhat shy.<br />The information from that Web site is not very reliable.<br />The questions on the worksheet covered the last seven chapters.<br />Two of Kristina’s best friends joined a sorority.<br />
  19. 19. Journal Prompt<br />
  20. 20. Brave New Worldby Aldous Huxley<br />A satirical piece of fiction, not scientific prophecy<br />
  21. 21. Satire:<br />A piece of literature designed to ridicule the subject of the work.<br />While satire can be funny, its aim is not to amuse, but to arouse contempt. <br />Ridicule, irony, exaggeration, and several other techniques are almost always present. <br />
  22. 22. Brave New World is an unsettling, loveless and even sinister place<br />
  23. 23. “Reading Brave New World elicits the same disturbing feelings in the reader which the society it depicts has vanquished.”<br />What does this mean?<br />
  24. 24. Huxley exploits anxieties about Soviet Communism and American capitalism.<br /> The price of universal happiness will be the sacrifice of honored shibboleths of our culture: “motherhood,”“home,”“family,”“freedom,” even “love.”<br />
  25. 25. Mustapha Mond, Resident Controller of Western Europe, governs a society where all aspects of an individual's life are determined by the state, beginning with conception and conveyor-belt reproduction.<br />A government bureau, the Predestinators, decides all roles in the hierarchy. <br />Children are raised and conditioned by the state bureaucracy, not brought up by natural families. <br /><ul><li>There are only 10,000 surnames.
  26. 26. Citizens must not fall in love, marry, or have their own kids. </li></li></ul><li>Brave New World, then, is centered around control and manipulation<br /><ul><li> He instills the fear that a future world state may rob us of the right to be unhappy.</li></li></ul><li>Time and place written: 1931, England<br />Date of first publication: 1932<br />Settings (place): England, Savage Reservation in New Mexico<br />
  27. 27. Settings (time): 2540 AD; referred to in the novel as 632 years AF (“After Ford”), meaning 632 years after production of the first Model T car<br />Narrator: Third-person omniscient<br />Point of view: Narrated in the third person from the point of view of Bernard or John, but also from the point of view of Lenina, Helmholtz Watson, and Mustapha Mond<br />
  28. 28. This novel is more applicable today than it was in 1932. This is a time of:<br />propaganda, censorship, conformity, genetic engineering, social conditioning, and mindless entertainment.<br /><ul><li> This was what Huxley saw in our future. His book is a warning.</li></li></ul><li>Essential Questions to connect the literature to today’s culture:<br />Is it better to be free than to be happy? <br />Is freedom compatible with happiness?<br />Is the collective more important than the individual?<br />Can children be taught effectively to think in only one certain way?<br /> Can young people be taught so well that they never question their teachings later?<br />Is stability more important than freedom?<br />Can alterations made by advanced science to mankind be made permanent at the DNA-level?<br />Can mankind be conditioned by science?<br />Should the individual be limited/controlled for the greater good? If so, how much?<br />
  29. 29. “Universal happiness keeps the wheels steadily turning; truth and beauty can’t.”Aldous Huxley<br />
  30. 30. Homework<br />Reading Journal #1<br />

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