Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Is Your Website Trauma-Informed?

425 views

Published on

Organizations serving victims of trauma may have multiple touchpoints with clients. One of the first may be the agency’s website. When people come to your website, are you helping them feel empowered? Or are you aggravating the symptoms of trauma itself?

Considering the overlapping principles of user experience (UX) and SAMHSA’s Six Key Principles of a Trauma-Informed Approach, NCCADV has examined what a trauma-informed website would look like. We will share about building trust, ensuring safety, and much more.

Keeping in mind the neurological, social, and physiological effects of trauma and IPV, we will review what website features may be most user-friendly and what’s likely just frustrating. We’ll look at real world website examples, both positive and negative, from NCCADV and agencies throughout the country. Webinar participants will gain practical suggestions and free tools to make effective changes to improve their websites immediately

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Is Your Website Trauma-Informed?

  1. 1. Trauma-Informed? Melissa Eggleston UX & Content Strategy Consultant melissa@melissaegg.com Is Your Website
  2. 2. Agenda •  Background •  Overlap of trauma-informed + user experience (UX) •  Five user experience ideas •  Five survivor-sensitive features •  Practical tools to help •  Resources for more learning
  3. 3. Wait, trauma-informed websites? •  On the playground, not the golf course •  Elizabeth Johnson (NCCADV Board Member) •  Trauma-informed •  User experience (UX) •  Overlap of trauma-informed with UX •  Won Aquent Design for Good Grant
  4. 4. Caveats •  I’m not an expert on trauma-informed websites, I’m learning too! •  This is complex. •  It’s easy to pick on other people’s websites when you don’t understand their constraints and context.
  5. 5. What is User Experience? User experience (UX) is the way a person feels about using a product, system or service.
  6. 6. UX the Discipline “User experience is a discipline focused on designing the end-to-end experience of a certain product.” (or website, service, system, program, etc...) - Rui Barroca, Product Designer
  7. 7. Trauma-Informed Approach •  Realizes the widespread impact of trauma and understands potential paths for recovery; •  Recognizes the signs and symptoms of trauma in clients, families, staff, and others involved with the system; •  Responds by fully integrating knowledge about trauma into policies, procedures, and practices; and •  Seeks to actively resist re-traumatization. - From Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
  8. 8. Short Definition Being trauma-informed means adapting both to better serve and to avoid further harm to people who have experienced trauma.
  9. 9. What symptoms of trauma might affect a website visitor?
  10. 10. Trauma survivors may: •  Have a hard time making choices and/or a limited attention span •  Have physical impairment •  Be emotionally vulnerable •  Fear for their safety or others’ safety •  Lack trust based on past experiences
  11. 11. 6 Trauma-Informed Principles
  12. 12. Trauma-Informed Principles 1.  Safety 2.  Trustworthiness and Transparency 3.  Peer Support 4.  Collaboration and Mutuality 5.  Empowerment, Voice, and Choice 6.  Cultural, Historical, and Gender Issues - From Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
  13. 13. Overlapping Principles with UX 1.  Safety 2.  Trustworthiness and Transparency 3.  Peer Support 4.  Collaboration and Mutuality 5.  Empowerment, Voice, and Choice 6.  Cultural, Historical, and Gender Issues
  14. 14. Other Guiding Principles •  We need “do-able,” not expensive, design improvements. •  This concept of a trauma-informed website and survivor-sensitive features is new and evolving. •  Let’s build on available research and resources.
  15. 15. “Every use of your website or mobile app is a conversation started by your site visitor.” - Ginny Redish, Author
  16. 16. What kind of greeting are you giving your online visitors?
  17. 17. Have you heard someone say this? •  “That website was just too easy. How unprofessional.” •  “I was hoping to have to dig around a little more.” •  “I wish it took a little longer to load.” •  “I was hoping for longer sentences and better vocabulary words.” •  “Those stock photos really helped me.”
  18. 18. 5Important UX Ideas
  19. 19. 1. Make it obvious in 5 seconds Empowerment, Trustworthiness, Transparency
  20. 20. “Oh it’s a ___________, where I can _______________”
  21. 21. 2. Reduce total cognitive load Empowerment, Trustworthiness, Historical Issues
  22. 22. “I’m tired just looking at it.” •  Is this clickable or not? •  What do they do? •  Where am I? •  What can I do here? •  Where should I start? •  Is this the navigation? Or is that the navigation? •  Where is _________?
  23. 23. “Within a fraction of time, people build a first visceral ‘gut feeling’ that helps them to decide whether they are going to stay at this place or continue surfing to other sites.” -  Google research study, 2012
  24. 24. “Within a fraction of time, people build a first visceral ‘gut feeling’ that helps them to decide whether they are going to stay at this place or continue surfing to other sites.” -  Google research study, 2012 Faster than the blink of an eye (!)
  25. 25. Reduce Cognitive Load •  Simplify •  Have less choices at a glance (progressive disclosure of information) •  Use white space •  Keep navigation, search box, other items consistent
  26. 26. Lots of Choices
  27. 27. Less Choices
  28. 28. 3. Increase readability of text Empowerment, Transparency, Cultural & Historical Issues
  29. 29. Constraint!
  30. 30. Ideal Text •  Less than 600 pixels wide •  Readable at Grade 9 or lower •  Inviting – not like a “wall of words” •  Avoids excessive capital letters •  Edited via the FREE Hemingway Editor tool
  31. 31. 4. Fix broken links, typos, errors
  32. 32. A broken link is a broken promise.
  33. 33. Use Free Online Resources •  Broken Link Checker https://validator.w3.org/checklink •  Spell Checker http://tools.seochat.com/tools/free-spell-checker/ http://respelt.com/ (low cost)
  34. 34. 5. Be more inclusive Empowerment, Trustworthiness, Cultural, History, & Gender Issues
  35. 35. Domestic Violence Page “Before”
  36. 36. Accessibility •  Greatest number of users can view your content •  Checklist and information here from 18F https://accessibility.18f.gov/index.html
  37. 37. Five UX Ideas 1.  Make it obvious in five seconds 2.  Reduce cognitive load 3.  Increase readability of text 4.  Fix broken links, typos, errors 5.  Be more inclusive
  38. 38. 5 Survivor Sensitive Features
  39. 39. 1. Improve safety alerts + exits ! Safety, Trustworthiness
  40. 40. Improve safety alerts and exits 1.  Have impossible to miss safety information. 2.  Ensure it’s easy to click on exit. 3.  Make it harder to get back to the site. –  Open a new site. –  Open a new site and close the current tab. –  Open a new site and break the back link.
  41. 41. 2. Adjust “contact us” Safety, Trustworthiness, Choice
  42. 42. Don’t ask survivors to leave an email trail on their computers without asking them to think about it first.
  43. 43. 3. Make “get help” links stand out Empowerment, Trustworthiness, Safety
  44. 44. 4. Make it more mobile-friendly Empowerment, Safety, Trustworthiness
  45. 45. Why is mobile important for survivors?
  46. 46. What makes a website mobile-friendly?
  47. 47. SPEED
  48. 48. Speed Test Tools •  https://developers.google.com/speed/pagespeed/insights/ •  https://tools.pingdom.com/ •  https://www.webpagetest.org/
  49. 49. 5. Upgrade Your Images Empowerment, Trustworthiness, Cultural, Historical, & Gender Issues
  50. 50. No Triggering Images
  51. 51. Five Survivor-Sensitive Features 1.  Improve safety alert and exit 2.  Ensure “get help” button is prominent 3.  Adjust “contact us” for safety 4.  Make it more mobile-friendly 5.  Upgrade your images
  52. 52. 10 Ideas to Apply to Your Website 1.  Make it obvious in five seconds 2.  Reduce total cognitive load 3.  Increase readability of text 4.  Fix broken links, typos, errors 5.  Be inclusive 1.  Improve safety alert and exit 2.  Ensure “get help” button is prominent 3.  Adjust “contact us” for safety 4.  Make it more mobile-friendly 5.  Upgrade your images UX ideas Survivor-Sensi+ve Features to Help You Be More Trauma-Informed
  53. 53. Want more UX?
  54. 54. Want to keep talking about trauma- informed tech? Send me an email, and let me know. melissa@melissaegg.com
  55. 55. Let’s start the trend of trauma-informed websites!

×