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Safety Moment GHS vs NFPA Chemical Labeling

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Globally Harmonized System and National Fire Protection Agency Hazard labeling comparison

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Safety Moment GHS vs NFPA Chemical Labeling

  1. 1. GHS vs. NFPA Hazard Identification
  2. 2. GHS : Higher Risk = Lower Number 1 – extremely hazardous 2 – highly hazardous 3 – hazardous 4 – will be harmful 5 – may be harmful 4 – extremely hazardous 3 – highly hazardous 2 – hazardous 1 – harmful 0 – no risk NFPA : Higher Risk = Higher Number
  3. 3. Health Hazard - 4 – deadly 3 – extreme danger 2 – hazardous 1 – slightly hazardous 0 – no hazard Fire Hazard - 4 – below 73 Fo 3 – below 100 Fo 2 – below 200 Fo 1 – above 200 Fo 0 – will not burn Reactivity - 4 – may detonate 3 – may detonate with shock and heat 2 – violent chemical change at high temps or pressures 1 – unstable if heated 0 – stable Specific Hazard – OXY – oxidizer ACID – acid ALK – alkaline COR – corrosive W – water reactive – radiation hazard
  4. 4. NOTE: For firefighters, so focus is on behavior at high temps – not necessarily lab work.
  5. 5. •flammable •pyrophorics •self-heating •emits flammable gas •self-reactives and organic peroxides Types B, C, D, E, & F •oxidizers •explosives •self-reactives and organic peroxides Types A & B
  6. 6. •irritant (skin & eye) •skin sensitizer •acute toxicity (harmful) •narcotic effects •respiratory tract irritant •hazardous to ozone layer •acute toxicity (fatal or harmful) •carcinogens •mutagenicity •reproductive toxicity •respiratory sensitizer •target organ toxicity •aspiration toxicity
  7. 7. •corrosive to skin •corrosive to metals •may cause eye damage •gas under pressure •aquatic toxicity
  8. 8. Sigma Aldrich Summary of the GHS System of Labeling OSHA Health Hazard Criteria OSHA Physical Hazard Criteria

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