Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Habermas, the Public
Sphere, and
Democracy: A
Critical Intervention
Douglas Kellner
Prepared by: Mel Franky S. Lizardo
Soc...
DOUGLAS
KELLNER
Born 1943
Era 20th / 21st-century philosophy
Region Western Philosophy
School Frankfurt School,
Main inter...
Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
The Structural
Transformation of the
Public Sphere (1962)
Jurgen Habermas
Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
Introduction
Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
Habermas Within the
Frankfurt School: Origins and
Genesis of Structural
Transformation of the Public
Sphere
Lizardo.mfs@pn...
Institute studies of the German working class and
post-World War Two
German citizens disclosed a high degree of political
...
What is Public
Sphere ?
Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
Idealized model of Democratic Debate
People come together in various forms and discuss
issues of common concerns
Public Op...
The Dialectics
of the Public
Sphere
Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
Democratization
Individual Self
Development
In
Contrast
Political
participation
Historical
Genesis of BPS
Account on the
S...
Historical Genesis
Late 18th and 19th Century in Britain, France
and Germany
Venues: Salon, Coffee Shops and even
discussi...
Public Sphere , Private
Sphere and Bourgeois
Public Sphere
a space of institutions and
practices between the private
inter...
Market
capitalism
Liberal
democracy (19th
century)
Stage of state
monopoly and
capitalism
CULTURE INDUSTRY
revitalize the ...
Habermas and the Public
Sphere: Critical Debates
Ideality
Neglecting the plebeians and
proletariats
Neglecting the womens ...
C. Wright Mills
tended to utilize the Institute models of the media as
agents of manipulation and social control, althoug...
The Linguistic Turn
contains norms to
criticize domination
and oppression and
a force
basis at once for social
critique, d...
Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
The
Linguistic
Turn
D.Kellner Point
of View
Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
Globalization, New
Technologies and Public
SpheresThe radio, television, and other electronic modes of
communication were ...
Globalization, New Technologies and
Public Spheres
Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
Habermas, the Public
Sphere, and
Democracy: A
Critical Intervention
Douglas Kellner
Prepared by: Mel Franky S. Lizardo | I...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Habermas, the public sphere, and democracy a critical intervention

845 views

Published on

The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere (1962)
Jurgen Habermas

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Habermas, the public sphere, and democracy a critical intervention

  1. 1. Habermas, the Public Sphere, and Democracy: A Critical Intervention Douglas Kellner Prepared by: Mel Franky S. Lizardo Sociological and Political Theories Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  2. 2. DOUGLAS KELLNER Born 1943 Era 20th / 21st-century philosophy Region Western Philosophy School Frankfurt School, Main interests critical theory, postmodern theory, critical media literacy, media culture, alter- globalization Notable ideas multiple technoliteracies Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  3. 3. Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  4. 4. The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere (1962) Jurgen Habermas Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  5. 5. Introduction Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  6. 6. Habermas Within the Frankfurt School: Origins and Genesis of Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  7. 7. Institute studies of the German working class and post-World War Two German citizens disclosed a high degree of political apathy and authoritarian-conservative dispositions (see Fromm 1989), so too did the surveys of German students disclose an extremely low percentage (4%) of "genuinely democratic" students contrasted with 6% rigid authoritarians. Similarly, only 9% exhibited what the authors considered a "definite democratic potential," while 16% exhibited a "definite authoritarian potential" (Habermas, et. al, 1961: 234). And within the more apathetic and contradictory attitudes and tendencies of the majority, a larger number were inclined more toward authoritarian than democratic orientations. Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  8. 8. What is Public Sphere ? Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  9. 9. Idealized model of Democratic Debate People come together in various forms and discuss issues of common concerns Public Opinion Debate Venues Topics Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  10. 10. The Dialectics of the Public Sphere Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  11. 11. Democratization Individual Self Development In Contrast Political participation Historical Genesis of BPS Account on the Structural Change of PS Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  12. 12. Historical Genesis Late 18th and 19th Century in Britain, France and Germany Venues: Salon, Coffee Shops and even discussion in Print Media Discussed and Decided only by the Elites For the first time in history, individuals and groups could shape public opinion, giving direct expression to their needs and interests while influencing political practice. The bourgeois public sphere made it possible to form a realm of public opinion that opposed state power and the powerful interests that were coming to shape bourgeois society. Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  13. 13. Public Sphere , Private Sphere and Bourgeois Public Sphere a space of institutions and practices between the private interests of everyday life in civil society and the realm of state power. consisted of social spaces where individuals gathered to discuss their common public affairs and to organize against arbitrary and oppressive forms of social and public power Open Discussion (Freedom of Speech) consisted of social spaces where individuals gathered to discuss their common public affairs and to organize against arbitrary and oppressive forms of social and public power Institutionalize Institutionalize Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  14. 14. Market capitalism Liberal democracy (19th century) Stage of state monopoly and capitalism CULTURE INDUSTRY revitalize the public sphere by setting "in motion a critical process of public communication through the very organizations that mediatize it" Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  15. 15. Habermas and the Public Sphere: Critical Debates Ideality Neglecting the plebeians and proletariats Neglecting the womens public sphere Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  16. 16. C. Wright Mills tended to utilize the Institute models of the media as agents of manipulation and social control, although he sometimes qualified the media's power to directly and consistently manipulate the public. stressed the crucial role of the mass media in shaping individual behavior and inducing conformity to middle class values. Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  17. 17. The Linguistic Turn contains norms to criticize domination and oppression and a force basis at once for social critique, democratization, and to establish critical theory on a stronger theoretical foundation embedded in power in an existing social system, they serve interests of domination and manipulation Integrally related to power Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  18. 18. Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  19. 19. Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  20. 20. Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  21. 21. The Linguistic Turn D.Kellner Point of View Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  22. 22. Globalization, New Technologies and Public SpheresThe radio, television, and other electronic modes of communication were creating new public spheres of debate, discussion, and information; hence, activists and intellectuals who wanted to engage the public, to be where the people were at, and who thus wanted to intervene in the public affairs of their society should make use of these technologies and develop communication politics and new media projects. Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  23. 23. Globalization, New Technologies and Public Spheres Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph
  24. 24. Habermas, the Public Sphere, and Democracy: A Critical Intervention Douglas Kellner Prepared by: Mel Franky S. Lizardo | II-9 BSSE | Sociological and Political Theories | Prof. A. Abulencia Lizardo.mfs@pnu.edu.ph

×