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Shopping myths busted using eye tracking

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What we have assumed as tested, true and trusted has changed. See the reality of how consumers shop through their own eyes.

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Shopping myths busted using eye tracking

  1. 1. March 2014 Kirk Hendrickson, Founder & CEO, Eye Faster, LLC Meinhard Hausleitner, President, Spark Marketing Real Shoppers, Real Insights Shopping Myths See the reality how consumers shop through their own eyes!
  2. 2. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Definition Myth 2
  3. 3. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Collectively held, but false, current beliefs about how people shop. Some of those beliefs are not true any longer … BECAUSE … Behavior: How people shop has changed … •New channels (Internet) •New consumer technology (mobile) •New retail environments Research: How data can be collected has changed … •New research methodologies •New research technology •New research analytics Shopping Myths 3
  4. 4. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Location 1. Signage at the entrance works very well to inform and entice shoppers 2. The checkout is great at driving impulse purchases Time 3. The more time a shopper spends in a category the more she/he buys Communication 4. Advertising lifestyle images also work best for In-store signage and communication Shoppers 5. Mothers shopping with children buy more 6. Waiting shoppers are a great target for advertising Category 7. Consumers shop each category differently Myths 4 There are established beliefs about most key in-store factors These are the myth we will explore in more detail
  5. 5. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC We are using eye-tracking to bust the myths! Eye Tracking – The Myth Buster Technology 5
  6. 6. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Go to this link for videos http://eyefaster.com/eye-tracking-in-action/ Eye Tracking Videos
  7. 7. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Eye tracking measures and analyses visual attention, aka fixation (via eye video), as well as behavior (via a point-of-view video) Eye Tracking – The Myth Buster Technology 7 Notice Evaluate Select Buy Activity Quick glance Subliminal recognition Closer look Pick up packages Read labels and information Buy product or put it back on the shelf Driver Awareness Orientation in the store Relevance Checking products against needs Consideration Comparing products Choice Rationalize choice Buy selected product Visual Attention Behavior
  8. 8. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Data eye tracking will deliver Questions eye tracking data answer  What people look at  What are shoppers seeing?  What are shoppers not seeing?  In what order elements are looked at  Where do people start their shopping?  What catches their initial attention?  How is attention guided?  Duration of time spent looking at different elements  Are elements engaging or confusing?  Is the messaging being conveyed?  How people navigate the store and the shelf  What communications are used to find the category and product?  What guides attention while searching for an item?  What people put back on shelf and what they put into their basket  How many products are picked up?  How many are purchased and how many are rejected?  What did people look at on packages that were purchased and rejected?  How people interact with other people: shoppers, store associates, sales staff  How does interaction with others influence the purchase decision? Eye Tracking Data and Shopper Research 8 AttentionBehavior
  9. 9. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Myth #1 Signage at the entrance works very well to inform and entice shoppers Location 9 Truth: At the entrance, shoppers do not pay attention to signage. Signage is noticed significantly more once shopper is in shopping mode.
  10. 10. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Signs at the entrance/lobby are least likely to be seen • Very few shoppers are viewing or reading signage when entering or leaving. • They are preoccupied and are not receptive to messages that they cannot act on Location is key for Signage Effectiveness 10
  11. 11. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Location is key for Signage Effectiveness 20% shoppers viewed sign 10% shoppers viewed sign Signs in the natural path of shopping receive more attention • Signs are only viewed once shoppers feel ready to shop • The shopping mission roughly begins once the shopper has their cart or basket in hand and is moving towards products Shopping carts Entrance Shopping carts Entrance 11
  12. 12. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Myth #2 The checkout is great at driving impulse purchases Location 12 Truth: No, at checkout shoppers are preoccupied with waiting and unloading the cart!
  13. 13. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Checkout Behavior Mass Merchant 13 0.0% 2.0% 4.0% 6.0% 8.0% 10.0% 12.0% 14.0% 16.0% 0-10% 11-20% 21-30% 31-40% 41-50% 51-60% 61-70% 71-80% 81-90% 91-100% %PurchasesDuringTimeInterval Percent of Time Into Shopping Trip Purchase Timeline Purchasing drops off dramatically in last 20% of shopping most of which is checkout time • During that time, only 1.6% of purchases are made, as the shopper is focused on leaving not buying Checkout Source: POPAI 2014 Mass Merchant Channel Study 13
  14. 14. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Checkout Behavior Grocery Over 50% of checkout time consists of waiting but not much impulse purchasing • Checkout consists of 6 minutes or 20% of total shopping time (of an average 30min shopping trip) • Only 1% of purchasing takes place in that 20% of time although the checkout is prime impulse purchase zone 15% 20% 25% 22% 18% Unloading Cart Waiting for Cashier Scanning Paying Waiting for Completion Waiting in Line at Checkout 14 Eye tracking shows little attention given to checkout displays Checkout
  15. 15. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Myth #3 The more time a shopper spends in a category the more she/he buys Time 15 Truth: No, the quicker a shopper finds her/his FIRST product the more she/he buys in that category
  16. 16. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Shoppers are Task Focused The faster a shopper finds the first product the more they purchase • A shopper who finds the first item within 10 seconds purchases 50% more • The amount of time shoppers spend in a category has little to do with the number of products purchased 16 Source: TNS
  17. 17. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Shoppers are Task Focused Shoppers spend the vast majority of their time at the shelf searching for the product they know they want • When they are busy searching for specific products they are not open to influence • They are effectively blind to anything not relevant to the task at hand 17 Source: TNS
  18. 18. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC How long a shopper spends in a category has no impact on how many products are purchased Time in categories and shoppers purchasing 18 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Itemspurchasedbyshoppersbuying Mediantimeincategory Shopper median time in category and number of items purchased Items purchased Time in Category
  19. 19. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Myth #4 Advertising lifestyle images also work best for In-store signage Communication 19 Truth: No, product related images combined with creative, usage related verbal messages (call-to-action) work best!
  20. 20. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC • Strong visual appeal, generates involvement and motivation to buy • Feels enjoyable, original, dynamic, modern, refreshing, attractive • Highly appealing visual that ‘talks to consumers’ and ‘tickles the taste buds’ • Strong refreshment and heritage communication Messaging for In-store - based on traditional research • Lacks originality, spontaneity, fun and enthusiasm • Perceived as ‘everydayness’ in situations and moods • Does not reflect current reality of family dynamics • Situations are of low relevance and are not motivating occasions • Polarizes - specificity of the images excludes many people Product focused messaging works best in the in-store environment 20
  21. 21. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC A lot of money invested into in-store signage is wasted! • Signs are only noted on average by 3% of shoppers and evaluated by only 2% with less than 1% acting on the sign. Eye Tracking Research on Signage Action A quick glance Look closer and read Act on sign All 70 signs % shoppers Avg. per sign 3% Avg. per sign 2% Less than 1% Best performing signs (10 signs) Avg. per sign 12% Avg. per sign 7% About 3% Worst performing signs (60 signs) Avg. per sign 2% Avg. per sign 1% Less than 1% Notice Evaluate Act 21
  22. 22. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Characteristics of best performing signs • The best performing signs are noted by 12% of shoppers and evaluated by 7% • Those signs have the following attributes: – Easy to understand message – Clear shopper oriented call-to-action – One or a few focused images or visuals Eye Tracking Research: Best Performing Signs 22
  23. 23. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Characteristics of least performing signs • The least performing signs are noted by only 2% of shoppers and evaluated by 1%. • Those signs have the following attributes: – Difficult to understand message – Confusing verbal message – Too many and too detailed images or visuals Eye Tracking Research: Worst Performing Signs 23
  24. 24. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Images • Participants responded favorably to the meat images. • Without an image of people, the meat image got more attention and was noticed a lot sooner. Meat Eye Tracking Study 24 Verbal messages • Call-to-action messages fared better than brand taglines in terms of participant preference. • However, there is a need to avoid phrases that could come across as too commanding
  25. 25. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Myth #5 Parent shopping with children buy more Shoppers 25 Truth: Children distract the parent from shopping. A parent shopping alone spends less time in the aisle, but purchases more.
  26. 26. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Mothers shopping with kids Mothers agree that they spend more time in the store when shopping with their kids 26 Source: 2013 The Marketing Store & KidSay 77% agree … “I spend more time in the store when I have my kids with me.” 83% agree … “I spend longer in the supermarket when I have my kids with me.”
  27. 27. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Mothers shopping in the Cereal aisle Mothers shopping alone spend 10% less time shopping and purchased 14% more units than mothers shopping with kids •Mothers tend to buy different brands when shopping alone or with kids. •When shopping alone, mothers prefer General Mills, and Quaker, while mothers shopping with kids prefer Schnucks, Kellogg’s and Post 27
  28. 28. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Mothers shopping in the Juice aisle Cereal Juice Mothers shopping alone spend 12% less time shopping and purchased 29% more units than mothers shopping with kids • Mothers tend to buy different brands when shopping alone or with kids. • Minute Maid most popular brand with mothers shopping alone while Simply is preferred by mothers shopping with kids. 28
  29. 29. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Myth #6 Waiting consumers are a great target for advertising Shoppers 29 Truth: Waiting consumers are most focused on how to reduce the wait time for their task, largely ignoring advertising.
  30. 30. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC • 86% Looking around • 6% Returning nozzle Most time at pumping gas is wasted • 50% Close gas cap • 20% Take receipt • 20% Enter payment • 12% Open gas cap • 11% Talking Total time at pump = 6 min 30 During pumping gas most time is ‘wasted’ by just looking around • Customers at gas stations spend about 2 minutes at the pump Pre Pumping 50sec Pumping 50sec Post Pumping 15sec
  31. 31. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Signage Fixation - 60% never notice any sign at the pump Customers are not very engaged with signage • Only 40% of customers look at signage during their gas purchase • Only 1% of time is spent looking at brand signage 31
  32. 32. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Signage Fixation – Most time is spent with tasks Customers are task oriented and therefore not very engaged with signage • Most time is spent with the task at hand of pumping gas • Signage gets little attention except for displays close to the pump 32 Eye Tracking Heat Map Eye Tracking Sequence Eye Tracking Fixation 36% 12% 36% 28% 30% 24% 5%
  33. 33. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Myth #7 Consumers shop each category differently Category 33 Truth: Yes and No. The overall process of shopping is the same but the time spent and influencing criteria is different by category
  34. 34. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Notice Evaluate Select Buy Driver Awareness Orientation in -store Relevance Checking products Consideration Comparing products Choice Rationalize choice Activity A quick glance, colors and shapes Look closer at sections, packs and brands Pick up packages, read labels and information Put the product into basket or back Insight Start at left and right ends of categories and work their way to center Products that are evaluated are in the wider consideration set Products picked up are in the narrow consideration set 90% of products that are picked up are purchased Influence Store guidance, intuitive shelf layout, product placements Packages with key identifiers (colors, shape or design of package) Information on packages, intuitive information flow Products that stand out Category Purchase Funnel The stages and activities on the path-to-purchase are the same but time spent on specific activities in each stage differs 34
  35. 35. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Hold Read Fixate The activities are the same but time spent on specific activities and distribution across categories differ • Fixating, Reading and Holding are the main shopping activities across all categories • On average 45% of time is spent fixating, 30% reading and 25% holding • But the different categories are shopped very differently when it comes to action taken Shopper Behavior: Time and Activity in Categories 35 Read = Evaluate Hold = Select Fixate = Notice
  36. 36. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Category sections get different attention from shoppers • The CSD aisle is shopped very evenly with all products getting even attention. • The Salty snack aisle is shopped very differently. Different products and sections get different attention. Shopper Attention: Category shopping Carbonated Beverages Dips, Salty Snacks 36
  37. 37. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Shoppers are Task Focused Shoppers tend to evaluate products in sections where better known brands are and tend to buy products from those sections. 37 % Evaluating % Purchasing % Noting
  38. 38. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Purchase criteria and consideration Category purchase criteria differ substantially • Shoppers buy cereal by brand but salad dressing and chilled juice by flavor • Cereal receives much more attention because shoppers spend more time reading nutritional information on cereal than on the other products 38 Survey data Eye tracking data
  39. 39. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC Purchase Intent and Actual Purchase – Example cream cheese Intention can differ dramatically from actual shopping behavior based on in-store situation and stimuli • Shoppers shopping predominantly for flavor, brand selection is influenced by sales • Kraft was on sale for 40% off • Resulting in nearly 3 times more shoppers buying twice more units 39 3x shoppers 4x units
  40. 40. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC New technology advances in research allow us to get closer to the shopper’s true behaviors and true focus of their attention. Eye tracking techniques can be used to reevaluate and refine established beliefs and develop new insights to gain a competitive advantage. Final Thoughts 40
  41. 41. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC 41 Kirk Hendrickson, Founder & CEO, Eye Faster, LLC Email: kirk.hendrickson@eyefaster.com Tel: 925-452-4976 Web: www.eyefaster.com Meinhard Hausleitner President, Spark Marketing Email: meinhard@spark-mktg.com Tel: 480-699-2657 Web: www.spark-mktg.com
  42. 42. Copyright © 2014 Eye Faster, LLC For more information please contact us: Kirk Hendrickson, Founder & CEO, Eye Faster, LLC Email: kirk.hendrickson@eyefaster.com Tel: 925-452-4976 Web: www.eyefaster.com Meinhard Hausleitner, President, Spark Marketing Email: meinhard@spark-mktg.com Tel: 480-699-2657 Web: www.spark-mktg.com Contacts

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