The NDIS: a
role-based ICT
approach
Dr Scott Hollier
Disability employment conference 2014
2
• Australia’s only independent not-for-
profit organisation devoted to
increasing access to media for
people with disabi...
Who am I?
• Professional:
• Project Manager & WA Manager for
Media Access Australia
• W3C Advisory Committee representativ...
Identifying the need
• Media Access Australia regularly
approached by disability service
providers for advice
• Two key qu...
Project aims and objectives
Aim:
• Create a Service Providers Accessibility Guide
Objectives:
• Assist service providers t...
Relevance of project
• Federal government requires its
websites to be accessible (WCAG 2.0)
• Mainstream technologies now ...
7
• Draft created over a three-month
period
• Requested feedback to draft from a
number of other NDIS grant
recipients
• C...
8
Service Providers
Accessibility Guide:
A quick reference guide
for accessible
communications
The guide
Guide contents
• Chapter 1: Introduction
• Chapter 2: How people with
disabilities access online information:
• Benefits, ...
Guide contents
• Chapter 3: producing and distributing
your messages for people with
disabilities
• Accessibility and orga...
Guide contents
• Chapter 4: setting up computers and
devices for people with disabilities
• Planning your approach
• Acces...
12
• Chapter 5: Quick-reference checklist
• Chapter 6: Links to all the resources
used in the manual
• Appendices: complet...
13
• Audience: all staff
• Provides basic overview of legal
requirements
• Use cloud-based WebAnywhere
screen reader: turn...
14
• Audience: policy officers
• Requirements of Australian
government (Web, documents)
• Requirements of UNCRPD
• Relevan...
15
• Audience: ICT professionals
• Focus on W3C WCAG 2.0 ISO standard
• Guidelines include use of alternative
text, captio...
Chapter 3: Document
creation
• Audience: content producers
• How to determine the best document
format (HTML, Word, PDF)
•...
Chapter 3: Email and social
media
• Audience: marketing and
communications
• Structuring emails in an accessible way
inclu...
Chapter 4: Accessibility
features in products
• Audience: employers, carers, support
staff, individuals with disabilities
...
Chapter 4: Windows 7/8.1
• Change the icon and text size
• Adjust cursor width and blink rate
• Mouse pointer size and mov...
Chapter 4: Mac
Improvements over Windows:
• Better screen reader VoiceOver
• Braille display support
However…
• VoiceOver ...
Chapter 4: iOS
iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad:
• Great access: VoiceOver, zoom,
captioned video, colour changes.
• VoiceOver ...
Chapter 4: Android
Google Android phone and tablets:
• Much cheaper than Apple
• Features and apps include Talkback
screen...
Chapter 4: Social media
Includes:
• AT helpdesk for Facebook
• Easy Chirp for Twitter
• Keyboard shortcuts for Skype
• Usi...
Guide distribution
• Guide is freely available online at
www.mediaaccess.org.au
• E-mail info@mediaaccess.org.au to
reques...
Professional Certificate in
Web Accessibility
• Six week online training course
• University-accredited. Jointly delivered...
Access iQ:
A Media Access Australia service
• Complete Guides to Web Accessibility
• Australia’s only web accessibility se...
Further information
• E-mail:
scott.hollier@mediaaccess.org.au
• Telephone:
• (02) 9212 6242 (head office)
• (08) 9311 823...
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The NDIS: a role-based ICT approach - Dr Scott Hollier at the Disability Employment Conference 2014

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Dr Scott Hollier discusses the necessity of ICT accessibility, providing an in-depth review of Media Access Australia's 'Service Providers Accessibility Guide', covering the topics of policy & legislation, web accessibility, document creation, email & social media, Windows, Mac, iOS, Android and more.

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The NDIS: a role-based ICT approach - Dr Scott Hollier at the Disability Employment Conference 2014

  1. 1. The NDIS: a role-based ICT approach Dr Scott Hollier Disability employment conference 2014
  2. 2. 2 • Australia’s only independent not-for- profit organisation devoted to increasing access to media for people with disabilities • Provides expert knowledge and advice on existing and emerging mainstream technologies • Works as a catalyst for change in multiple areas of access Who is Media Access Australia?
  3. 3. Who am I? • Professional: • Project Manager & WA Manager for Media Access Australia • W3C Advisory Committee representative • Academic: • Adjunct Senior Lecturer, Edith Cowan University • PhD thesis ‘The Disability Divide’ • Personal: Legally blind, first-hand knowledge of access issues
  4. 4. Identifying the need • Media Access Australia regularly approached by disability service providers for advice • Two key questions: • How can I make sure that the information we create and distribute is accessible? • How can I make sure that our staff and clients with disabilities can use their computers and mobile devices to receive our information?
  5. 5. Project aims and objectives Aim: • Create a Service Providers Accessibility Guide Objectives: • Assist service providers to adapt their office and communications to support people with disabilities • Practical resource with industry consultation • Book form to maximise use and portability • Focus on mainstream technologies to support employment using tools already in workplace
  6. 6. Relevance of project • Federal government requires its websites to be accessible (WCAG 2.0) • Mainstream technologies now evolved to include accessibility on all major platforms (Windows, Mac, iOS, Android) so issue is more how to set up than buying expensive AT
  7. 7. 7 • Draft created over a three-month period • Requested feedback to draft from a number of other NDIS grant recipients • Changes incorporated including a more role-based approach and checklist Development process
  8. 8. 8 Service Providers Accessibility Guide: A quick reference guide for accessible communications The guide
  9. 9. Guide contents • Chapter 1: Introduction • Chapter 2: How people with disabilities access online information: • Benefits, barriers and brief overview of legal requirements • Use of assistive technology • Practical exercise: using a screen reader
  10. 10. Guide contents • Chapter 3: producing and distributing your messages for people with disabilities • Accessibility and organisational roles • Government policies and legislative requirements • Building an accessible website • Publishing content online (HTML, Word, PDF) • Preparing accessible emails • Engaging with accessible social media (Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Blogging)
  11. 11. Guide contents • Chapter 4: setting up computers and devices for people with disabilities • Planning your approach • Accessibility features in popular OS and mobile devices (Windows, Mac, iOS, Android) • Social media accessibility (Facebook, Twitter, Skype, LinkedIn)
  12. 12. 12 • Chapter 5: Quick-reference checklist • Chapter 6: Links to all the resources used in the manual • Appendices: complete Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 and YouTube captioning guide Guide contents
  13. 13. 13 • Audience: all staff • Provides basic overview of legal requirements • Use cloud-based WebAnywhere screen reader: turn off monitor and use your website Chapter 2
  14. 14. 14 • Audience: policy officers • Requirements of Australian government (Web, documents) • Requirements of UNCRPD • Relevant web and ISO standards Chapter 3: Policy and legislation
  15. 15. 15 • Audience: ICT professionals • Focus on W3C WCAG 2.0 ISO standard • Guidelines include use of alternative text, captioning videos, colour contrast, navigation, predictable ways of using, helping users avoid and correct mistakes, content accessible by keyboard Chapter 3: Website accessibility
  16. 16. Chapter 3: Document creation • Audience: content producers • How to determine the best document format (HTML, Word, PDF) • HTML techniques such as no ‘click here’, styles, layout • Word: techniques such as use of styles, accessible tables, alternative text • PDF: techniques include effective tagging, structuring and providing alternatives
  17. 17. Chapter 3: Email and social media • Audience: marketing and communications • Structuring emails in an accessible way including text alternatives and labels • Facebook: providing accessible layouts and structures • Twitter: using accessibility-related hashtags • YouTube: providing captions on videos • Blogs: accessible layout and accessible content
  18. 18. Chapter 4: Accessibility features in products • Audience: employers, carers, support staff, individuals with disabilities • Helps with decision-making process on: • Should computers be upgraded? • Is one OS better than another to meet the individual need? • Are there apps available that can help?
  19. 19. Chapter 4: Windows 7/8.1 • Change the icon and text size • Adjust cursor width and blink rate • Mouse pointer size and movement • Change the colour scheme to high contrast • ToggleKeys • Visual alerts • On-screen keyboard • Magnifier (touch-enabled in 8) • Narrator screen reader (touch-enabled in 8) • NVDA free alternative downloadable screen reader
  20. 20. Chapter 4: Mac Improvements over Windows: • Better screen reader VoiceOver • Braille display support However… • VoiceOver doesn’t work with the Office suite, works mostly with OpenOffice for Mac
  21. 21. Chapter 4: iOS iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad: • Great access: VoiceOver, zoom, captioned video, colour changes. • VoiceOver & Zoom work together in iOS 6+ • App compatibility better all the time
  22. 22. Chapter 4: Android Google Android phone and tablets: • Much cheaper than Apple • Features and apps include Talkback screen reader, magnifier, BIG Launcher, IDEAL accessibility apps However… • Only really a viable alternative if running Android 4.2+
  23. 23. Chapter 4: Social media Includes: • AT helpdesk for Facebook • Easy Chirp for Twitter • Keyboard shortcuts for Skype • Using Twitter for LinkedIn support
  24. 24. Guide distribution • Guide is freely available online at www.mediaaccess.org.au • E-mail info@mediaaccess.org.au to request a printed copy
  25. 25. Professional Certificate in Web Accessibility • Six week online training course • University-accredited. Jointly delivered by UniSA and W3C member Media Access Australia • For ICT professionals to integrate web accessibility into work practices • www.mediaaccess.org.au/learn
  26. 26. Access iQ: A Media Access Australia service • Complete Guides to Web Accessibility • Australia’s only web accessibility service directory • Training and workshops • Digital accessibility consultancy • Website testing and auditing • www.accessiq.org
  27. 27. Further information • E-mail: scott.hollier@mediaaccess.org.au • Telephone: • (02) 9212 6242 (head office) • (08) 9311 8230 (direct) • Website: www.mediaaccess.org.au • Twitter: @mediaaccessaus

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