Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Upcoming SlideShare
Famous and vibrant festival of jodhpur that you must witness this year
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

0

Share

Download to read offline

Q4 2016 investor presentation final-posted to site_3.21.17

Download to read offline

Q4 2016 investor presentation final-posted to site_3.21.17

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

Q4 2016 investor presentation final-posted to site_3.21.17

  1. 1. McGraw‐Hill Education Q4‐2016 Update March 21, 2017 This presentation has been prepared for existing debt holders of McGraw‐Hill Global Education Holdings LLC and MHGE Parent, LLC .   Final
  2. 2. Important Notice Forward‐Looking Statements This presentation includes statements that are, or may be deemed to be, “forward‐looking statements.” These forward‐looking statements can be identified by the use of  forward‐looking terminology, including the terms “believes,” “estimates,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “may,” “will” or “should” or, in each case, their  negative or other variations or comparable terminology. These forward‐looking statements include all matters that are not historical facts. They appear in a number of  places throughout this presentation and include statements regarding our intentions, beliefs or current expectations concerning, among other things, our results of  operations, financial condition, liquidity, prospects, growth, strategies and the industry in which we operate. By their nature, forward‐looking statements involve risks and uncertainties because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that may or may not occur in the  future. We caution you that forward‐looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and that our actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity,  and the development of the industry in which we operate, may differ materially from those made in or suggested by the forward‐looking statements contained in this  presentation. In addition, even if our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate are consistent with the  forward‐looking statements contained in this presentation, those results of operations, financial condition and liquidity or developments may not be indicative of results or  developments in subsequent periods. Any forward‐looking statements we make in this presentation speak only as of the date of such statement, and we undertake no obligation to update such statements.  Comparisons of results for current and any prior periods are not intended to express any future trends or indications of future performance, unless expressed as such, and  should only be viewed as historical data. Non‐GAAP Financial Measures Certain financial information included herein, including Billings, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA, are not presentations made in accordance with U.S. GAAP, and use of such  terms varies from others in the same industry. Non‐GAAP financial measures should not be considered as alternatives to income from continuing operations, income from  operations or any other performance measures derived in accordance with U.S. GAAP as measures of operating performance or cash flows as measures of liquidity. Non‐ GAAP financial measures have important limitations as analytical tools, and you should not consider them in isolation or as substitutes for results as reported under U.S.  GAAP.  This presentation includes a reconciliation of certain non‐GAAP financial measures to the most directly comparable financial measures calculated in accordance with  U.S. GAAP.  Adjusted EBITDA, which is defined in accordance with our debt agreements, is provided herein on a segment basis and on a consolidated basis. Adjusted  EBITDA on a  consolidated basis is presented as a debt covenant compliance measure.  Management believes that the presentation of Adjusted EBITDA is appropriate to provide  additional information to investors about certain material non‐cash items and about unusual items that we do not expect to continue at the same level in the future as well  as other items to assess our debt covenant compliance, ability to service our indebtedness and make capital allocation decisions in accordance with our debt agreements. 2
  3. 3. Business Review
  4. 4. McGraw‐Hill Education 2016 Results Market share gains in cyclically smaller year for both Higher Ed and K‐12  2016 was a challenging year for the industry with cyclically  smaller markets in both Higher Ed and K‐12   Channel destocking and a smaller front‐list unfavorably  impacted Higher Ed sales while strong new adoption market  share capture partially offset the anticipated smaller K‐12  market    MHE expanded market share in both Higher Ed and K‐12   Digital investment proven successful at scale; almost $800M  digital Billings and double‐digit growth in both user  engagement and direct‐to‐student e‐commerce sales    Expect MHE Billings improvement in 2017 from a larger front‐ list and abatement of channel destocking in Higher Ed as well  as a larger K‐12 new adoption market   Significant liquidity of over $750M in cash and available credit  lines at year‐end; repurchased debt on open market in Q1‐17 Company Performance MHE Billings $1,913M        (‐7.0%)  MHE Adjusted EBITDA  $421M      (‐13.4%) MHE Digital Billings $785M        (+2.7%) % MHE Digital Billings 41%    (+400bps) Market Share1 Higher Ed Market Share (+) ~200 bps since 2012 K‐12 Market Share (+) ~500 bps since 2013 Key Indicators Adaptive Interactions since 2012 11.9B Connect/LearnSmart Paid Activations 3.3M         (+11%) ALEKS Unique Users 3.3M        (+24%) Company Liquidity Cash                                                                  $419M Credit Line Capacity                                     350M Total Liquidity                                                 $769M Q1‐17 Debt Repurchase                                $47M (Open market purchases) 4 Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2016 1Management Practice, Inc. (MPI) and Association of American Publishers (AAP) McGraw‐Hill Education
  5. 5.  Strong digital growth was more than offset by a smaller  front‐list and distributor destocking  Despite destocking, back‐list net sales grew 4.1% Y/Y in 2016,  as digital demand outpaced the print decline  Direct‐to‐student e‐commerce net sales grew 22.9% Y/Y in  2016, representing 20%+ of total Higher Ed Billings  Sales continued to shift from Q4‐16 to Q1‐17 as direct‐to‐ student purchases are increasingly made closer to the start  of the semester   Expect Higher Ed to stabilize in 2017 due to following:    ̶ Larger front‐list   ̶ Abatement of channel destocking driven by anticipated  lower actual returns from distributors– returns  favorability continuing into early Q1   5 Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2016 McGraw‐Hill Higher Education 2016 Results Industry in transition; meaningful opportunity to grow digital and still monetize print Company Performance Billings (net of accrued returns)  $736M      (‐10.8%)              % Digital Billings    56% (+1,100bps) Direct‐to‐Student Net Sales                 $172M     (+22.9%) *Total Net Sales (net of actual returns)  $713M      (‐9.5%) Back‐list Sales (net of actual returns)       $415M       (+4.1%) Front‐list Sales (net of actual returns)    $298M     (‐23.4%) Market Performance / Share1 Market Share (actual returns basis)         21.3%    (+54bps)  Industry Net Sales (actual returns)          ‐13.8% MHE Actual Returns Change (‘16 vs.‘15)  ‐$40M      (‐14.4%) Industry Actual Returns Change ‐$128M (‐9.2%) Key Indicators Connect/LearnSmart Paid Activations      3.3M         (+11%) ALEKS Unique Users                                      1.3M         (+19%) *Primary difference between Billings and net sales (industry market share measure)                 is the accrual of returns  1Management Practice, Inc. (MPI)  Higher Education
  6. 6.  K‐12 billings lower in 2016 due to a cyclically smaller new  adoption market vs. 2015 and softer open territory performance    Outsized performance in California English Language Arts (ELA)  driven by innovative program offering ̶ MHE K‐6 Reading Wonders program offers an integrated  English Language Learners’ platform and customized  reporting for teachers and a digital partnership with  multimedia lessons for grades 6‐8   Larger new adoption market anticipated in 2017‐2019 with key  purchases in California, Florida and Texas ̶ Well positioned for new adoptions in 2017, including  remaining 2/3 of California ELA purchases (2017‐2018),  but a tough comp vs. 2016  Open territory sales were down slightly in 2016 driven by losses  in a small number of key urban districts; modifications made to  drive improvement in 2017 6 Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2016 McGraw‐Hill K‐12 2016 Results Strong K‐12 new adoption performance precedes robust market opportunity  Company Performance Billings (net of accrued returns)                 $758M  (‐4.9%) % Digital Billings    34%  (‐300bps) Market Performance / Share1 Market Share (actual returns basis)          24.6% (+97bps) Adoption Market Share                               ~30% Open Territory Market Share                      ~20% Industry Net Sales (actual returns)             ‐9.2%                            MHE California New Adoption Market Share Performance  K‐8 ELA                                                               ~57% K‐5 ELA  ~70% 6‐8 ELA  ~37% Key Indicators ConnectEd Unique Users                              7.1M      (+38%) ALEKS Unique Users                                       2.0M      (+27%) *Primary difference between billings and net sales (industry market share measure)  is the accrual of returns  1 As per Monthly AAP data  ‐ Cohort of publishers for monthly AAP data differs from that of annual AAP data ‐ Monthly data reflects net sales on an actual returns basis submitted by 6‐7 publishers ‐ Annual data reflects net sales on an actual returns basis submitted by 5 publishers K‐12
  7. 7. International  Digital transition continued with a focus on localized digital  offerings, multi‐year, recurring revenue UAE contract and the  launch of new digital product pilots   Digital nearing 20% of total Billings vs. 11% in 2015  Recently launched two new products:  Connect2 and ELLevate English – these products are global and will be introduced in  the U.S.  Professional  Business continued to evolve from a traditional provider of  print products to digital subscription solutions   Growth of the Access subscription platform coupled with a  strong renewal rate continued to drive digital growth  Digital exceeded 50% of total Billings vs. 47% in 2015 7 McGraw‐Hill International & Professional 2016 Results Strong digital performance with growth opportunities ahead  Company Performance ‐ International International Billings (constant fx)            $303M        (‐1.6%) International Digital Billings                        $49M   (+42.4%) International Digital Billings % 17%   (+600bps) Key Indicators ‐ International Connect/LearnSmart Paid Activations        275K      (+7%) ALEKS Unique Users                                        112K      (+66%) Company Performance ‐ Professional Professional Billings                                     $122M  (0.8%) Professional Digital Billings  $64M  (+9.9%) Professional Digital Billings % 52%  (+500bps) Key Indicators ‐ Professional Access Platform Billings  $50M   (+17.3%) Access Platform Renewal Rate                  93%    Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2016 NEW PRODUCTS IN THE INTERNATIONAL MARKET  Connect2: Pre‐built all‐digital course framework attractive to   the localization and customization needs found within  international markets  ELLevate English: Global, digital‐first six level English Language  Learners’ course for grades 7‐12 leveraging MHE’s open  learning platform International & Professional
  8. 8. 8 McGraw‐Hill 2017 Preliminary Outlook Improving conditions in Higher Ed; well positioned for key adoptions in K‐12 Key Front‐List Titles – 2018 Copyrights (sold in 2017) Higher Ed:  Improving conditions anticipated for MHE in 2017  Expect Higher Ed Billings to stabilize in 2017 (vs. 2016) due to abatement of  channel destocking and a larger MHE front‐list  Actual returns favorable YTD March 15 th : down mid‐teens % Y/Y  Strong e‐commerce sales in early 2017 demonstrate continued progress in  digital transition; ($74M in e‐commerce sales, up 23% YTD March 15th)  Testing go‐to‐market strategies to maximize the print opportunity  Pre‐publication costs to increase ~$3‐5M to support launch of new front‐list  K‐12:  Difficult comp vs. 2016 but well positioned for key adoptions  New adoption market to expand in the 2017‐2019 period; 2019 is the largest  year for new adoptions in the period  CA anticipated to purchase ~50% of multi‐year reading adoption in 2017  FL social studies adoption is next largest adoption in 2017, but significantly  smaller than 2017 CA ELA adoption  Pre‐publication costs to increase ~$15‐20M ahead of key new adoptions  anticipated in 2019 Key drivers of success in 2017:  Front‐list sell‐through  Destocking abatement led by a continued  decline in returns 2017 K‐12 Market Opportunities  Key drivers of success in 2017:  Maintaining CA momentum against outsized         2016 performance  Level of purchasing in Florida  MHE improvement in open territory Higher Education K‐12
  9. 9. 0.7 1.0 1.6 2.00.8 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.5 2.0 2.7 3.3 2013 2014 2015 2016 K‐12 Higher Ed 2.2 2.6 3.0 3.3 2013 2014 2015 2016 MAINTAINING A LEADERSHIP POSITION IN DIGITAL  ADAPTIVE LEARNING  Paid activations, unique users and engagement on MHE digital  adaptive learning products grew double‐digit rates in 2016  Adaptive products continued to penetrate classrooms and  improve outcomes  ‐ 99M assignments submitted through Connect, up 12% Y/Y  ‐ ~6.9B interactions (questions answered) on LearnSmart since 2009 ‐ ~5.0B interactions (questions answered) on ALEKS since  2010 McGraw‐Hill Education FY 2016 Digital Ed Tech Highlights ~12 Billion cumulative adaptive interactions +11% CONNECT/LEARNSMART PAID ACTIVATIONS (US HIGHER ED) ALEKS UNIQUE USERS (GLOBAL HIGHER ED, K‐12)  +24% 9 (Millions) CONNECTED UNIQUE USERS (K‐12) 2013‐2016 CAGR:  +15% 2.2 3.5 5.2 7.1 2013 2014 2015 2016 +38%2013‐2016 CAGR:  +47% 2013‐2016 CAGR:  +32% International Connect/LearnSmart Paid Activations of 275K not included in Connect/LearnSmart totals above International ALEKS Unique Users of 112K included within total ALEKS Unique Users above
  10. 10. $67 $105 $140 $172 2013 2014 2015 2016 DIRECT‐TO‐STUDENT SALES CONTINUED TO GROW  SIGNIFICANTLY IN 2016  Higher Ed digital Billings expanded 1,100 bps Y/Y as a  percentage of total Higher Ed Billings in 2016  Direct‐to‐student e‐commerce channel was the largest  distribution channel for Higher Ed in 2016  Direct‐to‐student e‐commerce sales are predominantly stand‐ alone digital solutions  ‐ Paid activations of Connect/LearnSmart are increasingly  sourced through the e‐commerce channel ‐ Business and economics disciplines comprised more than  one‐third of all net sales from this channel ‐ ALEKS sales are gaining traction particularly in science,  engineering and math disciplines Higher Ed Billings Mix McGraw‐Hill Education Higher Ed Digital Billings Evolving the EdTech business model with increasing direct‐to‐student e‐commerce sales  DIGITAL VS. PRINT BILLINGS MIX % E‐COMMERCE NET SALES 10 +23% ($ in Millions) 2013‐2016 CAGR:  +37% 34% 38% 45% 56% 66% 62% 55% 44% 2013 2014 2015 2016 Digital Print (Traditional + Custom)
  11. 11. $16  $17 $292  $260  25% 31% 37% 34% $11  $19  $35  $49  12% 21% 11% 17% $22  $25  $58  $64  53% 61% 47% 52% $87  $90  $375  $411  45% 52% 45% 56% $138  $152  $765  $785  35% 42% 37% 41% 11 McGraw‐Hill Education Digital Billings Mix Digital now 56% of Higher Ed Billings; product mix impacted K‐12 in 2016 ($ in Millions) MCGRAW‐HILL EDUCATION +3% +10% K‐12 (11%) Q415 Q416 2015 2016 HIGHER ED Q415 Q416 2015 2016 +4% Q415 Q416 2015 2016 Q415 PROFESSIONAL +10% +15% Q416 2015 2016 INTERNATIONAL +42% +74% Q415 Q416 2015 2016 % of Total Billings % of Total Billings % of Total Billings % of Total Billings % of Total Billings  Digital is now an almost $800M  business for MHE  MHE digital Billings impacted by  K‐12 change in product mix  Strong Higher Ed digital growth  adversely impacted by channel  destocking (physical access  cards) and weak front‐list +2% +9%
  12. 12. Financial Review
  13. 13. $(7) $(5) $486  $421  nm nm 24% 22% $395  $361  $2,058  $1,913  Total BillingsMHE TOTAL BILLINGS 13 ($ in Millions) Adjusted EBITDAMHE ADJUSTED EBITDA  Digital % (9%) 29% (13%) Margin % (7%) Q415 Q416 2015 2016 Q415 Q416 2015 2016 35% 42% 37% 41% McGraw‐Hill Education Financial Review Year of transition in Higher Ed; better than expected K‐12 new adoption performance BILLINGS GROWTH IMPACTED BY A GREATER THAN  EXPECTED PRINT DECLINE IN HIGHER ED   2016 MHE Billings decreased 7% Y/Y on constant FX   Billings impacted by greater than expected distributor  destocking in Higher Ed and planned smaller K‐12 new  adoption market vs. 2015 ‐ A smaller Higher Ed front‐list was anticipated but the  extent and duration of destocking was not anticipated ‐ MHE realized better than expected K‐12 market share  capture in California reading /literacy   Digital Billings nearly $800M in 2016 as usage and  penetration continued to expand ‐ Paid activations, users and engagement on digital adaptive  learning platforms continued to grow double‐digit rates ADJUSTED EBITDA IMPACTED BY LOWER BILLINGS AND  TIMING OF INVESTMENT SPEND  2016 Adjusted EBITDA predominantly impacted by lower  Billings in Higher Ed and the timing of digital investment in  advance of upcoming opportunities  Billings flow‐through to EBITDA dollars favorably impacted  by higher gross margin and benefit of previous cost savings Constant FX  (8%) $363        (7%)       $1,921 Constant FX 37% $(5)       (14%) $420    McGraw‐Hill Education
  14. 14. $52  $39  $295  $234  26% 23% 36% 32% $195  $173  $825  $736  Higher Ed Financial Review Q4 performance in‐line with expectations conveyed after Q3; digital sales shift to Q1‐17 14 ($ in Millions) Total Billings Adjusted EBITDA HIGHER ED TOTAL BILLINGS HIGHER ED ADJUSTED EBITDA Q415 Q416 2015 2016 Digital % (11%)  (11%) Margin % 45% 52% 45% 56% Q415 Q416 2015 2016 DESTOCKING ABATING AS RETURNS DECLINE  Distributor destocking continued into the fourth quarter but  was partially offset by lower actual returns    Actual returns in 2016 declined 14% Y/Y vs. a 9% decline for  the industry ‐ MHE reserve accrual adjusted down 70bps to 22.7% in  2016; accrual calculation impacted by both actual returns  and change in gross sales   Digital Billings grew 4% Y/Y in the fourth quarter, in line with  expectations for this time of the year  ‐ Digital purchases for the back‐ to‐school semester  continued to shift to Q1 of the following year ‐ Standalone digital sales via our direct‐to‐student                  e‐commerce channel more closely align with the start of a  semester (historically, physical access cards would have  been sold to the channel in Q4) ADJUSTED EBITDA IMPACTED BY LOWER BILLINGS  2016 Adjusted EBITDA unfavorably impacted by lower print  Billings slightly offset by digital Billings growth and reduced  incentive expense  Billings flow‐through to EBITDA dollars favorably impacted  by the higher gross margin associated with digital product  sales and benefit from previous cost savings (24%)  (21%)  Higher Education
  15. 15. $(87) $(74) $127  $137  nm nm 16% 18% $66 $54 $798  $758  K‐12 Financial Review Strong performance in new adoptions; well positioned for upcoming opportunities 15 ($ in Millions) Total Billings Adjusted EBITDA K‐12 TOTAL BILLINGS K‐12 ADJUSTED EBITDA Digital % (5%) (18%) Margin % 25% 31% 37% 34% Q415 Q416 2015 2016 Q415 Q416 2015 2016 STRONG PERFORMANCE IN CALIFORNIA ELA   Stronger than anticipated new adoption market share gains  in California reading / literacy partially offset the smaller  market and softer performance in open territory    New adoption capture exceeded normalized levels in 2016  while open territory lagged due to losses in a small number  of key urban districts  Digital Billings were lower in 2016 strictly due to product  mix; reading / literacy is less digital than math and social  studies   Q4 is a seasonally small quarter for K‐12 ‐ Decline in Billings driven by an unfavorable Y/Y comp and  softer open territory performance ADJUSTED EBITDA FAVORABLY IMPACTED BY TIMING OF  PRE‐PUBLICATION INVESTMENT  2016 EBITDA impacted by the margin flow‐through on  anticipated lower Billings offset by lower pre‐publication  investment driven by the timing and size of new adoption  opportunities  Pre‐publication investment typically incurred 12‐18 months  in advance of targeted new adoption 15% 8% K‐12
  16. 16. $16  $18  $32  $34  40% 44% 26% 28% $41  $41  $123  $122  $13  $12  $33  $19  14% 13% 11% 6% $91  $92  $308  $295  International & Professional Financial Review Digital investment and growth continued across the portfolio 16 ($ in Millions) Total BillingsTotal Billings INTERNATIONAL TOTAL BILLINGS INTERNATIONAL ADJUSTED EBITDA Margin % Q415 Q416 2015 2016 Digital % Q415 Q416 2015 2016 12% 21% 11% 17% PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTED EBITDA PROFESSIONAL TOTAL BILLINGS  2016 Billings declined 2% Y/Y on constant FX as growth in  localized digital offerings was more than offset by lower print  sales   Margin adversely impacted by increase in pre‐publication  investment related to UAE agreement Digital % 53% 61% 47% 52% Q415 Q416 2015 2016 Margin % Q415 Q416 2015 2016 +1% (4%) Constant FX              3%   $94                                     (2%)   $303                 (1%) 0% Constant FX           (9%)   $12                                             (45%)     $18 +5% +11%(9%) (43%) International  2016 Billings decreased 1% Y/Y as growth in digital Access platform subscriptions was more than offset by a decline in  print and eBook sales   Margin favorably impacted by lower costs associated with  product mix and ongoing shift to digital solutions Professional
  17. 17. Capital Structure and Liquidity Significant liquidity to support business seasonality and de‐lever Senior Secured Term Loan due 2022                                     $1,567 Revolving Credit Facility due 2021 ($350M)                                  0  Total First Lien Indebtedness                                                 $1,567 Less:  McGraw‐Hill Global Education  Cash and Cash Equivalents                                        (412) Net First Lien Indebtedness                                                    $1,155 Last Twelve Months Covenant EBITDA                                     $421 Net First Lien Leverage Ratio                                                       2.7x Senior Unsecured Notes Due 2024                                            400 Net Total Indebtedness $1,555 Leverage Cash and Cash Equivalents  McGraw‐Hill Global Education Holdings                              $412 McGraw‐Hill Education Inc.                                                         7 Total McGraw‐Hill Education, Inc.                                       $419 Available under Credit Facilities at Dec 31, 2016                    350 Total Liquidity                                                                               $769 MCGRAW‐HILL EDUCATION INC. (MHE INC.) LIQUIDITY Notes ˗ Net Total Indebtedness calculation excludes $500M of MHGE Parent LLC debt and  cash held at McGraw‐Hill Education Inc.   ˗ Net First Lien Leverage covenant takes effect only if 30% of revolving line of credit  is drawn at quarter‐end.  Usage was less than 30% at December 31, so covenant  did not apply.  Covenant level is 5.25x in Q2 and 4.8x in Q1, Q3 and Q4. 17 MCGRAW‐HILL GLOBAL EDUCATION HOLDINGS COVENANT          LEVERAGE     Ended 2016 with a strong liquidity position  Management is committed to de‐levering, even after a  slower year ̶ Board authorized up to $107M for repurchase of  8.5% 2019 MHGE Parent PIK/Toggle Notes  callable Aug‐17  ̶ $47M purchased in open market at or below par;  priority – earliest maturity and highest coupon ̶ Anticipate additional repurchases if business  meets expectations and depending on market  conditions  No excess cash flow payment due in 2017 as a result of  the 2016 debt prepayment  Hedged $500M of floating rate debt in Q1‐17 ($ in Millions) AT DECEMBERR 31, 2016
  18. 18. 18 Summary MHE gained market share in Higher Ed and K‐12; widened competitive lead in digital  2016 was a challenging year for the Higher Ed industry as it transitions from print to digital – transition  to digital remains in early innings; meaningful opportunity to grow digital and still monetize print ̶ Anticipate new front‐list titles in 2017 (2018©) will drive print and digital sales along with  abatement of channel destocking ̶ Planning alternatives to maximize print opportunity by disintermediating used and rental  Strong new adoption share in K‐8 California reading/literacy partially offset the smaller market in 2016  ̶ Optimistic for upcoming key new adoption opportunities in the 2017‐2019 period  Executing well on the digital strategy within key international markets and with new product  introductions  Ended the year with a strong cash position and remain focused on de‐levering and digital investment
  19. 19. Appendix
  20. 20. Financial Terms and Acronyms 20 Financial Terms Description Adjusted EBITDA Non‐GAAP financial measure that includes adjustments required or permitted in calculating covenant compliance under our debt agreements. Adjusted  EBITDA is a non‐GAAP financial measure defined as net income from continuing operations plus net interest, income taxes, depreciation and amortization  (including amortization of pre‐publication investment cash costs) and adjusted to exclude unusual items and other adjustments required or permitted in  calculating covenant compliance under our debt agreements less cash spent for pre‐publication investment in addition to the change in deferred revenue. Billings (formerly referred  to as Adjusted Revenue) Non‐GAAP financial measure that we define as U.S. GAAP revenue plus the net change in deferred revenue excluding the impact of purchase accounting.  Billings, a measure used by management to assess sales performance, is defined as the total amount of revenue that would have been recognized in a period  if all revenue were recognized immediately at the time of sale. Change in Deferred  Revenue The Company receives cash up‐front for most product sales but recognizes revenue (primarily related to digital sales) over time recording a liability for deferred revenue at the time of sale. This adjustment represents the net effect of converting deferred revenues to a cash basis assuming the collection of all  receivable balances. Digital Billings (formerly referred to as Digital  Adjusted Revenue) Represents standalone digital sales and, where digital product is sold in a bundled arrangement, only the value attributed to the digital component(s) is  included. The attribution of value in bundled arrangement is based on relative selling prices (inclusive of discounts). EBITDA Earnings before interest (net), income tax, depreciation and amortization. Front‐list and Back‐list Front‐list represents brand new titles and new revisions of existing titles previously published. For example, the 2016 front‐list represents 2017 and 2016 copyrights sold in 2016.  Back‐list represents copyrights from 2015 and prior sold in 2016.  Net Sales Gross sales less actual returns; net sales are not adjusted for the impact of accruals / net change in deferred revenue. Pre‐publication Investment Pre‐publication costs reflect the costs incurred in the development of instructional solutions, principally design and content creation. These costs are  capitalized when the title is expected to generate future economic benefits and are amortized upon publication of the title over its estimated useful life of up  to six years. Sell‐Through                               Represents the percentage of net sales a new revised title generates vs. prior editions of the same title.  KPI Terms Description Paid Activation A user who accesses a purchased digital product for the first time.  Access can be through a physical access card purchased from a bookstore or directly over  MHE’s e‐commerce channel. Unique User on a platform An individual who authenticates a product at least once during a given period of time.
  21. 21. Digital Product Offering Descriptions 21 Product Description Higher Education K‐12 International Professional Access Digital subscription platform that provides easily searchable and  customizable digital content integrated with dynamic and  functional workflow tools   ALEKS Adaptive learning technology for the K‐12 and higher education  markets     Connect Open learning environment for students and instructors in the  higher education market     Connect2 Collaborative teaching and learning environment for the  International Higher Education market  ConnectEd Content delivery platform for the K‐12 market  ELLevate English Six level English Language Learning (ELL) course   Engrade Developer of an open digital platform for K‐12 education that  unifies the data, curriculum and tools to drive student achievement  and inform district educational strategy  LearnSmart Adaptive learning program which personalizes learning and designs  targeted study paths for students     Redbird A leading digital personalized learning company that offers courses  in K‐12 math, language arts and writing, and virtual professional  development programs for educators  SmartBook Adaptive reading product designed to help students understand  and retain course material by guiding each student through a  highly personal study experience    
  22. 22. Supplemental Financial  Disclosure
  23. 23. Billings and Adjusted EBITDA 23 Billings is a non‐GAAP sales performance measure that provides useful information in evaluating our period‐to‐period performance because it reflects the total amount  of revenue that would have been recognized in a period if we recognized all print and digital revenue at the time of sale. We use Billings as a sales performance measure  given that we typically collect full payment for our digital and print solutions at the time of sale or shortly thereafter, but recognize revenue from digital solutions and  multi‐year deliverables ratably over the term of our customer contracts. As sales of our digital learning solutions have increased, so has the amount of revenue that is  deferred in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Billings is a key metric we use to manage our business as it reflects the sales activity in a given period, provides comparability  from period‐to‐period during this time of digital transition and is the basis for all sales incentive compensation. In the K‐12 market where customers typically pay for five  to eight year contracts upfront and the ongoing costs to service any contractual obligation are limited, the impact of the change in deferred revenue is most significant.  Billings is U.S. GAAP revenue plus the net change in deferred revenue. EBITDA, a measure used by management to assess operating performance, is defined as net income from continuing operations plus net interest, income taxes,  depreciation and amortization (including amortization of pre‐publication investment cash costs). Adjusted EBITDA is a non‐GAAP debt covenant compliance measure  that is defined in accordance with our debt agreements. Adjusted EBITDA is a material term in our debt agreements and provides an understanding of our debt  covenant compliance, ability to service our indebtedness and make capital allocation decisions in accordance with our debt agreements. Each of the above described measures is not a recognized term under U.S. GAAP and does not purport to be an alternative to revenue, income from continuing  operations, or any other measure derived in accordance with U.S. GAAP as a measure of operating performance, debt covenant compliance or to cash flows from  operations as a measure of liquidity. Additionally, each such measure is not intended to be a measure of free cash flows available for management’s discretionary use,  as it does not consider certain cash requirements such as interest payments, tax payments and debt service requirements. Such measures have limitations as analytical  tools, and you should not consider any of such measures in isolation or as substitutes for our results as reported under U.S. GAAP. Management compensates for the  limitations of using non‐GAAP financial measures by using them to supplement U.S. GAAP results to provide a more complete understanding of the factors and trends  affecting the business than U.S. GAAP results alone. Because not all companies use identical calculations, our measures may not be comparable to other similarly titled  measures of other companies.  Management believes Adjusted EBITDA is helpful in highlighting trends because Adjusted EBITDA excludes the results of decisions that are outside the control of  operating management and can differ significantly from company to company depending on long‐term strategic decisions regarding capital structure, the tax rules in  the jurisdictions in which companies operate, and capital investments. In addition, Billings and Adjusted EBITDA provides more comparability between the historical  operating results and operating results that reflect purchase accounting and the new capital structure post the Founding Acquisition as well as the digital transformation  that we are undertaking which requires different accounting treatment for digital and print solutions in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Management believes that the presentation of Adjusted EBITDA is appropriate to provide additional information to investors about certain material non‐cash items and  about unusual items that we do not expect to continue at the same level in the future as well as other items to assess our debt covenant compliance, ability to service  our indebtedness and make capital allocation decisions in accordance with our debt agreements. Note:  In compliance with SEC interpretative guidance, we now refer to ‘Adjusted Revenue’ as ‘Billings’ throughout the presentation
  24. 24. MHE Higher Ed Front‐List / Back‐List Net Sales 24 ($ in Millions) Front‐list / Back‐list is on a net sales basis; refer to key financial terms in appendix  Twelve Months Ended December 31 Three Months Ended 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Dec‐2015 Dec‐2016 Digital Net Sales Front‐list $100 $126 $132 $156 $149 $36 $34 Back‐list 137                             153                             194                             220                          263                          43                               51                               Total Digital Net Sales $237 $278 $326 $376 $411 $79 $85 Y/Y % Front‐list (6.0%) 25.1% 5.2% 18.2% (4.7%) (1.1%) (4.6%) Back‐list 53.7% 11.8% 27.1% 13.4% 19.2% 2.6% 19.2% Total Digital Net Sales 21.1% 17.4% 17.2% 15.3% 9.3% 0.9% 8.3% Print Net Sales Front‐list $317 $323 $291 $233 $149 $46 $30 Back‐list 205                            215                           233                           178                         152                         32                             34                             Total Print Net Sales $523 $538 $524 $411 $302 $78 $65 Y/Y % Front‐list (23.9%) 1.9% (9.9%) (20.0%) (35.9%) (32.2%) (34.6%) Back‐list 0.6% 4.7% 8.5% (23.6%) (14.6%) (38.2%) 7.6% Total Print Net Sales (15.9%) 3.0% (2.6%) (21.6%) (26.7%) (34.8%) (17.4%) Total Net Sales Front‐list $418 $449 $423 $389 $298 $82 $65 Back‐list 342                            368                           427                           398                         415                         75                             85                             Total Net Sales $760 $817 $851 $787 $713 $157 $150 Y/Y % Front‐list (20.3%) 7.5% (5.7%) (8.1%) (23.4%) (21.4%) (21.5%) Back‐list 16.7% 7.5% 16.2% (6.8%) 4.1% (19.9%) 14.2% Total Net Sales (7.0%) 7.5% 4.2% (7.4%) (9.5%) (20.7%) (4.5%)
  25. 25. Higher Ed Industry and MHE Higher Ed Sales Trend 25 ($ in Millions) 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Higher Ed Industry per Management Practice, Inc. 1 Higher Ed Market  Gross Sales $5,726 $5,420 $5,453 $5,465 $5,302 $4,695 Returns 1,323                  1,311                  1,262                  1,214                  1,377                  1,250                  Net Sales $4,403 $4,110 $4,191 $4,251 $3,925 $3,446 Y/Y % Gross Sales n/a (5.3%) 0.6% 0.2% (3.0%) (11.4%) Returns n/a (0.9%) (3.7%) (3.8%) 13.5% (9.2%) Net Sales n/a (6.7%) 2.0% 1.4% (7.7%) (12.2%) McGraw‐Hill Education Return Detail Actual Returns $263 $276 $257 $252 $277 $237 Reserve for Returns Adjustment (3)                       (13)                    9                         16                      (31)                    (23)                    Reported Returns $260 $263 $266 $268 $246 $215 Return Accrual % 24.4% 25.8% 25.1% 24.4% 23.4% 22.7% McGraw‐Hill Higher Education Billings Mix (%) 2 For‐profit % of Total Higher Ed Billings 18% 19% 16% 11% 10% 10% Non‐profit % of Total Higher Ed Billings 82% 81% 84% 89% 90% 90% Billings will not reconcile to M PI submission due to classification of revenue between K-12 and Higher Ed (1) M PI data reflects gross and net sales on an actual returns basis and includes other adjustments, eg. advanced placement which is reported in K-12 (2) Billings mix on a net sales basis; refer to key financial terms in the appendix Twelve Months Ended December 31
  26. 26. K‐12 Industry New Adoption Market Overview 26 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017E 2018E 2019E Largest Adoption States Reading Reading* Science Math Social Studies Social Studies* Reading (K‐5) Reading (6‐12) Math (K‐5) Math (6‐12) Math (K‐8) Math (9‐12) Science Social Studies Science* All Other Adoption States Alabama Math Reading Social Studies Science Arkansas  Math Math* Reading Idaho Science Reading Math Social Studies Reading Indiana Reading Reading* Math (K‐8) Social Studies North Carolina Math Science Social  Studies Reading New Mexico Science Math Reading Social  Studies Science Math Social Studies (6‐12) Math Social Studies Social Studies Math (1) Excludes new state adoptions in non‐core disciplines such as career and technical education, music, art, world languages, health, etc. *Disciplines reflect 2nd or 3rd year of major purchasing Purchases from AR and IN classified as open territory effective 2015 West Virginia Mississippi Oklahoma Oregon South Carolina Tennessee Virginia Reading (9‐12) Reading (K‐6) Social Studies Math Science Reading Science Math Louisiana New State Adoptions by Purchase Year1 California (K‐8) Florida Texas Georgia Science Reading (K‐8) MathScienceSocial Studies Math Social Studies Math* Reading Reading* Social Studies Reading Social Studies Social Studies (K‐5)Reading Science Science Social StudiesScienceMathReading*ReadingSocial Studies Reading Math (9‐12) Reading Social Studies Social Studies Science Reading Math Science MathReading Math Reading*
  27. 27. K‐12 Industry Adoption and Open Territory Market Net Sales 27 ($ in Millions) 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016E 2017E 2018E 2019E Historical Industry Net Sales Per AAP1                                     Projected Industry Net Sales (Mean) 2 Total Adoption Net Sales $1,311 $1,391 $1,860 $1,621 $1,296 $1,354 $1,443 $1,710 $1,175 ‐ $1,418 $1,207 ‐ $1,608 $1,400 ‐ $1,471 $1,530 ‐ $1,910 Total Open Territory Net Sales  $1,423 $1,563 $1,425 $1,431 $1,474 $1,503 $1,557 $1,580 $1,450 ‐ $1,500 $1,475 ‐ $1,546 $1,500 ‐ $1,608  $1,500 ‐ $1,672 Total Adoption & Open Territory Net Sales $2,734 $2,954 $3,285 $3,052 $2,625 ‐ $2,918 $2,682 ‐ $3,154 $2,900 ‐ $3,079  $3,030 ‐ $3,582 (1) AAP total adoption and open territory net sales include front‐list and back‐list and is based on actual returns submitted by five publishers.  AAP net sales reflect US sales only and includes sales of core and non‐core disciplines, AP products, software and platforms etc.  Total adoption net saIes includes net sales from both new state adoptions and residual purchases  (2) Reflects an arithmetic average of MHE estimates with estimates from three wall street firms (3) High and low of MHE estimates with estimates from three wall street firms Projected Adoption & Open Territory Net Sales (Low/High) 3 *Projected industry net sales reflect an average of MHE estimates with estimates from three Wall Street firms Projected Total Adoption Net Sales (Low/High) 3 Projected Total Open Territory Net Sales (Low/High) 3 Adoption and Open Territory Net Sales 
  28. 28. K‐12 Industry and MHE K‐12 Sales Trend 28 ($ in Millions) Twelve Months Ended December 31 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016* K‐12 Industry per Association of American Publishers (AAP) AAP U.S. Net Sales  1 Total Adoption $1,311 $1,391 $1,860 $1,621 Open Territory                        1,423                         1,563                         1,425                         1,431  Total Net Sales $2,734 $2,954 $3,285 $3,052 Y/Y % Total Adoption n/a 6.2% 33.6% (12.8%) Open Territory n/a 9.8% (8.8%) 0.4% Total Net Sales n/a 8.1% 11.2% (7.1%) McGraw‐Hill Education K‐12 McGraw‐Hill Education Billings  2 Total Adoption $320 $318 $366 $450 $411 Open Territory / Other                            378                             359                             369                             348                             348  Total K‐12 Billings $698 $677 $734 $798 $758 Y/Y % Total Adoption n/a (0.5%) 15.0% 23.0% (8.6%) Open Territory / Other n/a (5.0%) 2.6% (5.7%) (0.1%) Total K‐12 Billings n/a (3.0%) 8.5% 8.6% (4.9%) MHE Adoption Participation % 96% 79% 67% 76% 87% (1) AAP annual data reflects unrestated net sales on an actual returns basis submitted by five publishers in each respective year; data reflects US sales only and includes sales of AP products, software and platforms, etc. AAP includes front-list and back-list net sales; annual data prior to 2015 has not been restated for the shift of AR and IN from adoption to open territory (2) M HE Billings reflect an accrued returns basis and will not reconcile to AAP submission due to classification of revenue; Total adoption includes new adoption and residual M HE Billings have not been restated for the shift of AR and IN in prior periods *AAP market data to be updated upon release of the AAP annual report 
  29. 29. Digital vs. Print Billings Detail 29 Figures are represented on a cash basis inclusive of actual returns but excluding purchase accounting adjustments.  Accrued returns are reflected in print revenue.  ($ in Millions) Q4 Billings Detail by Component December YTD Billings Detail by Component 2014 2015 2016 2015 2014 2015 2016 2015 2014 2015 2016 2015 Higher Ed  $84 $87 $90 3.9% $142 $108 $83 (23.2%) $226 $195 $173 (11.1%) K‐12 24 16 17 2.5% 49 50 38 (24.7%) 73 66 54 (18.0%) International 9 11 19 74.3% 86 80 73 (9.1%) 94 91 92 0.9% Professional 21 22 25 15.1% 19 19 16 (17.3%) 40 41 41 (0.2%) Other 5 2 1 (52.6%) (2) (0) 0 100.0% 2 2 1 (48.3%) Total MHE $142 $138 $152 10.1% $294 $257 $210 (18.6%) $436 $395 $361 (8.6%) % of Total Higher Ed  37% 45% 52% 63% 55% 48% 100% 100% 100% K‐12 32% 25% 31% 68% 75% 69% 100% 100% 100% International 9% 12% 21% 91% 88% 79% 100% 100% 100% Professional 53% 53% 61% 47% 47% 39% 100% 100% 100% Total MHE 33% 35% 42% 67% 65% 58% 100% 100% 100% %  vs %   vs%  vs Q4 Digital Billings Q4 Print Billings Q4 Total Billings 2014 2015 2016 2015 2014 2015 2016 2015 2014 2015 2016 2015 Higher Ed  $322 $375 $411 9.4% $516 $450 $325 (27.7%) $838 $825 $736 (10.8%) K‐12 215 292 260 (10.9%) 520 505 498 (1.4%) 734 798 758 (4.9%) International 31 35 49 42.4% 304 273 246 (10.1%) 336 308 295 (4.2%) Professional 58 58 64 9.9% 69 65 58 (10.4%) 127 123 122 (0.8%) Other 5 5 1 (74.9%) (1) (0) 1       N/M 4 5 2 (62.4%) Total MHE $631 $765 $785 2.7% $1,408 $1,293 $1,128 (12.8%) $2,039 $2,058 $1,913 (7.0%) % of Total Higher Ed  38% 45% 56% 62% 55% 44% 100% 100% 100% K‐12 29% 37% 34% 71% 63% 66% 100% 100% 100% International 9% 11% 17% 91% 89% 83% 100% 100% 100% Professional 46% 47% 52% 54% 53% 48% 100% 100% 100% Total MHE 31% 37% 41% 69% 63% 59% 100% 100% 100% %  vs %  vs %   vs Dec YTD Digital Billings Dec YTD Print Billings Dec YTD Total Billings
  30. 30. Free Cash Flow 30 ($ in Millions) Cash Flow Comparison 2015 2016 Y/Y $ Adjusted EBITDA 486 421 (65) ∆ in Accounts Receivable 12 (4) (16) ‐ lower Q4 billings offset by timing of K‐12 collections ∆ in Inventories (14) (27) (13) ‐ inventory build in advance of K‐12 CA ELA opportunity ∆ in Prepaid & Other Current Assets 1 (48) (16) 32 ‐ royalty reclassification in 15 accounts for ‐$24mm ∆ in Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses (22) (62) (40) ‐ royalty reclassification in 15 accounts for +$24mm, lower incentives in 16 ∆ in Other Current Liabilities (3) (25) (23) ‐ $17mm accrued interest decline in 16 driven by payment timing Adjusted EBITDA less ∆ in Working Capital Accounts 411 287 (124)               Pre‐publication Investment  (*) 99 90 (9) ‐ timing related spend with Int'l higher & K‐12 lower; see below Restructuring and Cost Savings Implementation Charges  (*) (25) (17) 8 ‐ lower severance payments Sponsor Fees  (*) (4) (4) 0 Cash Interest (170) (170) 1 ‐ Refinancing offset by shift to monthly interest payments Net (loss) from Discontinued Operations (net of non cash adjustment) (34) (2) 32 ‐ CTB divestiture in 2015 Inventory Obsolescence 25 20 (6) ∆ in Operating Assets and Liabilities 1 (6) (12) (7) Other 11 6 (5) Cash (used for) provided by operating activities 308 198 (110) 2015 2016 Y/Y $ Higher Education 30 30 (0) Adjusted EBITDA less ∆ in Working Capital Accounts per above 411                 287                 (124)               School 53 35 (18) ‐ Capital Expenditures & Payment of Capital Lease Obligations (41)                  (42)                  (1)                    International 7 18 11 Operating Free Cash Flow 2 369                 245                 (125)               Professional 9 8 (2) Total 99 90 (9) Cash Balance at Beginning of Period 414 553 139 Cash (used for) provided by operating activities 308 198 (110) Dividends (101) (320) (219) Net Borrowings 90 180 90 Payment of Deferred Financing Costs ‐                      (38) (38) Pre‐publication Investment (*) (99) (90) 9 Capital Expenditures (41) (38) 3 Investments, Acquisitions & Divestitures, net (11) (12) (1) Payment of Capital Lease Obligations ‐                      (4) (4) Other (7) (11) (4) Cash Balance at End of Period 553 419 (134) Source:  Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows or Adjusted EBITDA reconciliation if denoted by (*) 1  includes adjustment for change in short term and long term deferred royalties included in calculation of Adjusted EBITDA 2  includes the impact of certain non operational working capital items  (i.e., restructuring reserves, purchase accounting, accrued interest, etc.) Twelve Months Ended December 31 Pre‐publication Investment Key Drivers
  31. 31. Adjusted EBITDA Reconciliation Amounts above may not sum due to rounding. 31 ($ in Millions) 2015 2016 2015 2016 Net Income ($95) ($114) ($63) ($46) Interest (income) expense, net 193                          200                          47                             45                             Provision for (benefit from) taxes on income 5                               9                               3                               5                               Depreciation, amortization and prepublication investment amortization 214                          202                          54                             44                             EBITDA $316 $296 $41 $48 Change in deferred revenue (a) 228                          156                          (31)                           (41)                           Change in deferred royalties (b) (11)                           (17)                           (1)                             (0)                             Restructuring and cost savings implementation charges (c) 25                             17                             6                               7                               Sponsor fees (d) 4                               4                               1                               1                               Loss on extinguishment of debt (e) ‐                                27                             ‐                                ‐                                Other (f) 22                             29                             8                               15                             Pre‐publication investment cash costs (g) (99)                           (90)                           (32)                           (35)                           Adjusted EBITDA $486 $421 ($7) ($5) Three Months Ended December 31Twelve Months Ended December 31
  32. 32. Adjusted EBITDA Footnotes 32 (a) We receive cash up‐front for most sales but recognize revenue (primarily related to digital sales) over time recording a liability for deferred revenue at  the time of sale. This adjustment represents the net effect of converting deferred revenues to a cash basis assuming the collection of all receivable  balances. (b) Royalty obligations are generally payable in the period incurred with limited recourse.  This adjustment represents the net effect of converting deferred  royalties to a cash basis assuming the payment of all amounts owed.   (c) Represents severance and other expenses associated with headcount reductions and other cost savings initiated as part of our formal restructuring  initiatives to create a flatter and more agile organization. (d) Beginning in 2014, $3.5 million of annual management fees was recorded and payable to Apollo. (e) This amount represents the write‐off of unamortized deferred financing fees, original debt discount and other fees and expenses associated with the  Company’s refinancing of its existing indebtedness on May 4, 2016.  (f) For the year ended December 31, 2016 the amount represents (i) non‐cash incentive compensation expense and (ii) other adjustments required or  permitted in calculating covenant compliance under our debt agreements. For the year ended December 31, 2015, the amount represents (i) non‐cash  incentive compensation expense; (ii) elimination of the gain of $4.8 million on the sale of an investment in an equity security and (iii) other adjustments  required or permitted in calculating covenant compliance under our debt agreements.  (g) Represents the cash cost for pre‐publication investment during the period excluding discontinued operations.
  33. 33. Revenue Bridge & Segment Detail 33 ($ in Millions) Amounts above may not sum due to rounding. 2015 2016 2015 2016 Reported Revenue $1,830 $1,757 $424 $400 Change in Deferred Revenues 228                          156                          (29)                           (39)                           Billings $2,058 $1,913 $395 $361 Billings by segment Higher Education $825 $736 $195 $173 K ‐ 12 798                          758                          66                             54                             International 308                          295                          91                             92                             Professional 123                          122                          41                             41                             Other 5                               2                               2                               1                               Total Billings $2,058 $1,913 $395 $361 Adjusted EBITDA Higher Education $295 $234 $52 $39 K ‐ 12 127                          137                          (87)                           (74)                           International 33                             19                             13                             12                             Professional 32                             34                             16                             18                             Other (1)                             (2)                             (1)                             0                               Total Adjusted EBITDA $486 $421 ($7) ($5) Three Months Ended December 31Twelve Months Ended December 31
  34. 34. Adjusted Operating Expense Bridge 34 ($ in Millions) Amounts above may not sum due to rounding . 2015 2016 2015 2016 Operating Expense Bridge Total Reported Operating Expenses $1,252 $1,207 $323 $308 Less: Depreciation & Amortization of intangibles (125)                       (128)                        (34)                         (31)                         Less: Amortization of prepublication costs (89)                           (74)                           (20)                           (13)                           Less: Restructuring and cost savings  (25)                           (17)                           (6)                             (7)                             Less: Other adjustments (22)                           (29)                           (8)                             (15)                           Adjusted Operating Expenses $991 $959 $255 $241 Three Months Ended December 31Twelve Months Ended December 31
  35. 35. 35 Financial Statement Revision In the December 31, 2016 financial statements, the company revised previously issued financial information for two  accounting changes relating to K‐12 royalties and Free With Order (FWO).  A summary of the change and impact follows:  MHE defers royalties associated with digital subscription products and amortizes over the subscription period; prior to 2016, K‐12  royalties had been deemed immaterial and expensed upfront; ̶ Royalty reassessment following the significant increase in K‐12 royalties associated with the 2016 CA ELA adoption and, as a  result, K‐12 royalties were material in 2016 and should now be deferred.  MHE allocates revenue between print, digital and FWO print products. Prior to 2016, FWO digital products were not material to the allocation. However, during 2016, MHE sold bundled arrangements with multiple deliverables including FWO digital products associated with the 2016 CA ELA adoption.   Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 FY Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 FY Non‐GAAP Impact Billings ($0.2) $0.0 $0.0 $2.7 $2.5 $0.0 $0.0 $0.0 $0.9 $0.9 Adjusted EBITDA (5.5) 0.0 1.0 3.7 (0.8) (3.0) (1.0) (1.0) 2.7 (2.4) Y/Y $ Billings $0.2 $0.0 $0.0 ($1.8) ($1.6) Adjusted EBITDA 2.5 (1.0) (2.0) (1.1) (1.6) GAAP Impact GAAP Revenue ($2.1) ($1.2) ($0.6) ($0.7) ($4.6) ($2.0) ($17.4) ($10.8) $33.8 $3.7 Pre Tax Operating Income (6.1) 0.7 4.3 4.8 3.7 (6.1) (12.6) 0.9 33.2 15.5 Y/Y $ GAAP Revenue $0.1 ($16.2) ($10.2) $34.6 $8.3 Pre Tax Operating Income 0.1 (13.4) (3.4) 28.5 11.8 2015 2016

Q4 2016 investor presentation final-posted to site_3.21.17

Views

Total views

1,150

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

855

Actions

Downloads

5

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×