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SDGs Baseline Survey Findings Presentation

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SDGs Baseline Survey Findings Presentation

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SDGs Baseline Survey Findings Presentation

  1. 1. SDGs Baseline Survey Findings Presentation to The South West States At The Mainstreaming Sustainable Development Goals into State Development Plan Workshop. 1
  2. 2. . The summaries of the survey findings for the South West as presented By Mr. Felix Obanubi. Lead Specialist, Development Animation Programme (DAP) 2
  3. 3. . • Executive Summary • Introduction: Purpose & Goals of the Survey • Background • Introduction of Partners • Processes • Survey Findings • Observations and Recommendations • Conclusions. 3
  4. 4. Agenda Survey Purpose& Goals In keeping with Goal 17 of the SDGs, this survey is a collaboration between DAWN Commission and DAP with support from DFID Purpose • The purpose of the survey is to begin to create an inventory of stakeholders (baseline data) and their activities and the range of influence in the civic space; • Get a clear understanding of the perception of roles and responsibilities of the different respondent groups in the thematic areas and take on suggestions, recommendations of the next steps for partnership; • Facilitate capacity building between sectors and for different respondent groups, • Determine the capacity of civil engagement requires across the six states of the South West Region of Nigeria towards integrating the SDGs into national/sub- national and Local government development plans. Goal • The goal of the baseline survey is to bridge deficit in data based, inform and guide programme planning and design arose out of a series of activities and workshops carried out in the later part of the year by the partners and varied stakeholders. 4
  5. 5. Agenda High points of the Survey Findings • The general level of awareness is low, so public enlightenment on SDGs is critical. • The results/respondents were not accurate as people included researchers provided some explanations, even few government officers has use search engine before few despondence begins answering the questions; without this, the level of awareness would have been even lower than reflected in the survey results. • Readiness to implement SDGs is still low- many still do not see the need for collaboration or partnership non- multi- stakeholder dimension. • There is a need to align/ mainstreaming all governments/all sectors’ programme into the SDG indicators. • People are not able to link their day to day activities to fit into the SDGs. • Media should be focused on more. 5
  6. 6. . Preparations • Series of meetings were held among DAP, DAWN and DfID, in regards to the design of the survey and a Round table meeting with the enumerators to open- up the research design for critical analysis and discussion. • At the end of a meeting held on 17th January 2017 at the offices of Development Agenda for Western Region (DAWN Commission), 10th Floor, Cocoa House, Ibadan, enumerators were commissioned. Survey Administration • This covered a period of 10 days. The questionnaire was administered both electronically and manually and later entered unto the electronic form by the field team. Each day, a state by state update was given on the progress of the survey. Respondents: • A total of 1407 responses were received from the six states. 6
  7. 7. . • Respondents: • A total of 1407 responses were received from the six states. 7
  8. 8. . State differences in level of awareness and in the experience in the implementation of the survey make it clear that each state is unique in their experiences and needs General Level of Awareness of SDG 8
  9. 9. . • . 9
  10. 10. . • . 10
  11. 11. . • . 11
  12. 12. . • . 12
  13. 13. . • . 346 386 163 268 276 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 CAPACITY BUILDING FUNDING M&E PARTNERSHIP TECHNICAL SUPPORT Expectations for development partners 13
  14. 14. . EKITI STATE 14
  15. 15. Ekiti State • The use of the electronic data was more difficult , so hard copy was used because majority of respondents are not ICT complaints. • Government officers found it hard to release information until they got an approval from higher level officers • The awareness of SDG was low, even though some knew about the MDG • The NGOs knew more about SDGs • Private sector were more willing to give information after the initial concerns of what would it benefit them • Private sector said; information dissemination of the survey was very poor- programs should be brought to the grassroot • Government: civil servants should be apolitical, having to write names made it difficult for them for fear of repercussions 15
  16. 16. . • LAGOS STATE 16
  17. 17. Lagos State • It took a lot to drive the process in Lagos, the director, office of transformation had to go personally from MDA to MDA to get the questions answered • Time was also short to meet the needs of government protocol • A lot of government responses were not reported because by the time the responses came in, the survey had closed • Private sector awareness was low, NGOs knew more, Govt. awareness was also okay. • People got scared seeing the whole survey. • The time is short for these programs especially for the government sector • Lagos State awareness level is low 17
  18. 18. . • OGUN STATE 18
  19. 19. . Ogun State • NGOs had more awareness • There was suspicion on the part of artisans, professional bodies like the NBA which also didn’t know much about the SDGs. • Private sector didn’t see a need for involvement in SDGs. • Uneducated groups wanted the survey translated and had a concern for being carried along later in the process 19
  20. 20. . • ONDO STATE 20
  21. 21. Ondo State • Government level of awareness is very law, though they were receptive to the hard copies of the survey. Min. of commerce- only 1 person filled. Low level officials were more receptive • SDG office refused to fill the questionnaires totally because they had not been briefed. Min of budget were receptive • Organized Civil society were also receptive, though they preferred hard copies also • Private sector is emerging and were open though they were not enough. They don’t recognized the relevance yet. • Across all the senatorial districts, the level of awareness is very low. • The transition going on in the state made it difficult to reach the top level civil servants who could give approval for the questionnaire, also made it a very sensitive period for dissemination of information. 21
  22. 22. . • OSUN STATE 22
  23. 23. Osun State • The response to the online tool was very poor so hard copies was made • Government was not interested in filling any forms because they are on half salary • The suspicion about being tracked is real and that affected the filling of the survey forms filled even at the government offices • Private Sector are more receptive, but they wanted to know how it would benefit them • Awareness is generally low 23
  24. 24. . 24
  25. 25. Oyo State • Awareness level is low across board • There was reluctance to release information • At the same period there was news of dismissals around the state • Letter from DAWN was not accepted – they insisted they needed another letter from the head of service, in spite of that, the response was still poor • Private sector were suspicious of the government intension, and though they were more receptive, they wanted to know how it would benefit them • The period for the survey was a critical period for civil servants, they were fraught with fear of dismissal. LGAs wanted a letter directly from the governor. • Faith Based Organisations level of awareness is low • The level of involvement of the MDA (the State planning office) helps with the response level we obtained. 25
  26. 26. . GENERAL OBSERVATIONS • High ignorance of SDGs by most literate populace including media personnel. • Wide spread Low level of awareness about the SDGs among every single sector of society • Across the region, they was widespread misconception and insecurity among careers workers of the State MDAs which made many of them resist participating in the survey for fear of being victimised by political forces. • High level of bureaucracy among Government MDAs that makes collaboration and accessibility of information difficult • Bureaucracy in all the States’ MDAs also contributed significantly to delays and refusal by some Government workers who insisted in getting authorization from their superiors before they can participate in the survey. • There also exists a wide capacity gap among CSOs, private sector and government to adequately track their activities in line with the SDGs. 26
  27. 27. . GENERAL OBSERVATIONS CONT…… • Private sector is unaware of the linkages between their activities and the SDGs, even hospitals and schools (Goals’ 3 & 4) that have direct bearing on the SDGs are not aware of this linkage. • Generally, there is widespread agreement that there is need for a regional body that will coordinate activities around SDG awareness, data gathering and M&E across the SW. There are suggestions for how this body should be formed and what it should do and how. • Beyond funding, respondents also expect development partners to be involved in Capacity Building, provision of Technical Support and promoting Partnerships among stakeholders. • Respondents expect governments to create an enabling environment for business development, growth and general wellbeing of the citizens by the development and implementation of relevant policies and laws. • State differences in level of awareness and in the experience in the implementation of the survey make it clear that each state is unique in their experiences and needs 27
  28. 28. . Recommendations • There is urgent need for wide Spread Awareness Campaigns using social media, electronic and print media in both English and Yoruba to reach out to all levels in all the states across the region. • It is recommended that rather than create a new structure for coordinating SDG efforts across the region, DAP takes on the role working in collaboration with DAWN Commission and with state level informal structures that help in coordinated planning for awareness raising, sensitization and gathering, analyzing, reporting and disseminating of data and progress reports on SDG – state and regional level. This will make way for proper accountability. • That the body should help to work with government MDAs to streamline policies especially with respect to SDGs in order to create uniformity across MDAs with regards to interaction and collaborations with other stakeholders (civil society, private). • There is a need to facilitate state specific and contextualized SDG related planning towards achieving state level priorities aside from the generic prioritized goals at regional level 28
  29. 29. . • There is need for communications strategy on SDGs to create awareness among the varied publics. • Capacity building for CSOs, private and government staff on programming, Monitoring, Evaluation and reporting progrss in line with the Sustainable Development Goals should be a priority. • There is a need to create a State level structure for co-ordination of the various efforts of Government, CSO and the Private sector for easy priority setting, communication, reporting and feedback. • It is recommended that all the state governments in the region be encouraged to domesticate and implement the Freedom of information law in alignment with the spirit of SDG slogan ‘no one left behind’ and ‘all hands be on deck’. This will make access to information possible and thus empower citizenry for positive and proactive engagement for governance. • There is a need for awareness creation and capacity building on SDGs for personnel of Key line Ministries, Department and Agencies of Government • The task of Monitoring and Evaluation of SDG efforts across the region will need to be taken seriously and needs to be a task of the coordinating body Recommendations Cont…. 29
  30. 30. Recommended Implementation 30
  31. 31. . 31 www.dap-Nigeria.org mail@dap-nigeria.org fbobanubi@gmail.com 08037176842

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