Diagramming.

5,265 views

Published on

Published in: Education, News & Politics
  • Be the first to comment

Diagramming.

  1. 1. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNDiagrammatic exercise•Analysis diagram to investigate the dominant idea of a project•To investigate the formal characteristic of each work TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  2. 2. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNMake an analysis of your architecture. The objective is to introduce visual thinking through diagramming, and to introduce the basic principles of form, space and order in architectural design. The analysis is based on, but not limited to, the following:• Organization of form• Organization of space• Circulation and paths-space relationship• Spatial hierarchies• Massing• Symmetry & Balance• Rhythm & repetition TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  3. 3. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN - Study your project - Draw the plan, elevation andMETHODOLOGY section - Start diagramming your scheme - Composed your diagram - Presentation TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  4. 4. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNLA ROTONDAVICENZA, ITALY TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  5. 5. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNSTRUCTURE •Synonymous with support •Column, plane or combination •Conceptualizing frequency, pattern, simplicity, regularity, randomness and complexity •Can be use to define space, create units, articulate circulation, suggest movement to develop composition and modulation. TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  6. 6. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNSTRUCTURE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  7. 7. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNNATURAL LIGHT• The manner in which, and the location where, daylight enters a buildings• Quantity, quality and color affect the perceptions of mass and volume• Result from filtering, screening and reflecting• Concept of size, location and frequency of openings TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  8. 8. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNNATURAL LIGHT TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  9. 9. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNMASSING•Three dimensional configuration of a building•Perceptual image of the building as a totality•Concept of context, collections and patterns of units, primaryand secondary elements•To define and articulate exterior spaces, accommodate siteand to identify entrance TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  10. 10. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNMASSING TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  11. 11. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNPLAN TO SECTION•Plan as a device to organize activities and can generate form•Horizontal and vertical configuration on their own but togetherthere form the volumetric understanding•To relate at a number of scale: a room, a part of the wholebuilding TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  12. 12. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN PLAN TO SECTION TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  13. 13. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN PLAN TO SECTION TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  14. 14. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN PLAN TO SECTION TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  15. 15. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNUNIT TO WHOLE•Examines architecture as units which can be related to createbuildings•May comprise only one unit, where unit is equal to the whole oraggregations on units•Unit can be adjoining, separate, overlapping, or less than thewhole TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  16. 16. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNUNIT TO WHOLE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  17. 17. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN UNIT TO WHOLE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  18. 18. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE•Process of adding, aggregating and subtracting built form•Additive renders the parts of the building as dominant•Subtracting renders the whole of the building as dominant•Richness can occur when both ideas are employed simultaneously•It is also possible to subtract pieces from an identifiable whole andthen add the subtracted parts back to create the building TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  19. 19. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  20. 20. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  21. 21. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  22. 22. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNHIERARCHY•Physical manifestation of the rank in ordering•Hierarchy implies rank ordered change from one condition toanother: major-minor, open-closed, simple-complex, private-public, sacred-profane, served-servant and individual-group TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  23. 23. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN HIERARCHY TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  24. 24. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN HIERARCHY TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  25. 25. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNGEOMETRY•Formative idea in architecture that embodies both plane and solidgeometry to determine built form•Grids are identified from basic geometries through multiplication,combination, subdivision and manipulation•Geometry as a design tool•Single most common determinant or characteristic in buildings TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  26. 26. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN GEOMETRY TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  27. 27. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN GEOMETRY TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  28. 28. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNSYMMETRY AND BALANCE•Fundamental issue of composition•The state of equilibrium•Symmetry is a specialized form of balance•Symmetry exist when the same unit occurs on both side of thebalance line•Can happen from reflection, rotation and move along a line TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  29. 29. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNSYMETRY AND BALANCE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  30. 30. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNSYMETRY BALANCE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  31. 31. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNREPETITIVE TO UNIQUE •Exploration of spatial and formal components which renders as multiple or singular entities •Unique is understood to be a difference within a class or a kind TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  32. 32. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNREPETITIVE TO UNIQUE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  33. 33. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN REPETITIVE TO UNIQUE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  34. 34. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNCIRCULATION TO USE •Circulation and use space represent the significant dynamic and static component in all buildings •Use space is the primary focus •Circulation is the means by which the design is engaged •Circulation determines how a person experience the building TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  35. 35. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNCIRCULATION TO USE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  36. 36. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN CIRCULATION TO USE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  37. 37. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNCIRCULATION TO USE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  38. 38. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNPART OF WHOLE REDUCTION TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  39. 39. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNGRID TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  40. 40. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN PARTI •As the dominant idea of a building which embodies the salient characteristics •Encapsulates the essential minimum of the design which the architecture can be generated TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  41. 41. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN TADAO ANDO Church On The Water Tomamu, Hokaido, Japan 1985-1988 TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  42. 42. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNSTRUCTURE NATURAL LIGHT MASSINGPLAN TO SECTION PLAN TO SECTION SYMETRY AND BALANCE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  43. 43. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  44. 44. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN HEIRARCHY TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  45. 45. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNGEOMETRY TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  46. 46. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNSubmission RequirementPostcardYou are then required to investigate and formulate your findings into a set of 15diagrams translated to a series of 15 post-card (A5 size).The diagrams should be precise and informative to express the analysis of the ideashidden in the project assigned.You are to use no more than three colours and the post-card should be well craftedand beautifully drawn to be mounted on a hard surface.ModelYou are also required to produce a ‘white’ model of your assigned project.The model should be a synthesis of your analysis. The base of the model should notexceed the size of an A3 MDF board. The model should be crafted with your utmostworkmanship and stripped of all its unnecessary elements. TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  47. 47. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNFORMAT A3 DRAWINGS •A3 BUTTER /TRACING PAPER •TECHNICAL PEN •NO BORDER •TITLE AT RIGHT HAND LOWER CORNER TITLE •TO BE COMPOSE AS A SET TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  48. 48. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  49. 49. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNStudio activity for Thursday 4th August 2011 1. Drawing 2. Presentation (tutorial group) U must have……… 3.Your completed poster(2xA3) 4.Drawing equipments 5.A3 size tracing paper 6.Enlarge plans of your chosen project TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  50. 50. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGNEXERCISE 4: SPATIAL EXPERIENCE• This exercise introduces the notion of spatial qualities in architecture. According to Ching (2007), spatial qualities are determined by the level of enclosure, openings and views. Different spaces may have different qualities: spaces that are inside or outside, spaces of movement or rest (static/dynamic), hidden or revealed spaces.• Select one main space to develop and articulate the spatial qualities. You are required to consider ‘viewing out’ and light/shadow play. You are also required to consider materiality, and their implications to architectural space & form. The issue of materiality will be integrated with your Building Materials module.Outcome: Sketches of internal expression of space TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  51. 51. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  52. 52. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  53. 53. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS
  54. 54. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING & DESIGN TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY LAKESIDE CAMPUS

×