Prosthodontics (2002)

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Prosthodontics (2002)

  1. 1. University of WashingtonSCHOOL OF DENTISTRYProsthodonticsEducation Program Self-study Report Commission on Dental Accreditation Site Visit: November 19-21, 2002
  2. 2. SELF-STUDY GUIDE FOR ADVANCED SPECIALTY EDUCATION PROGRAMSSponsoring Organization: University of Washington Dental School(Dental School/Hospital, Other, e.g., Consortium)Street Address: 1959 NE PacificCity, State & Zip Code: Seattle, Washington 98195Chief Executive Officer (UniversityPresident/Chancellor)or Hospital Administrator: Dr. Richard L. McCormick, PresidentTelephone Number: (206) 543-5010Fax Number: (206) 616-1784E-Mail Address: rlm@u.washington.eduDental School Dean orChief of Dental Service: Dr. Martha J. SomermanTelephone Number: (206) 543-5982Fax Number: (206) 616-2612E-Mail Address: somerman@u.washington.eduProgram Director: Keith M. Phillips, D.M.D., M.S.D.Telephone Number: (206) 543-5923Fax Number: (206) 543-7783E-Mail Address: kphil@u.washington.eduI have seen and reviewed the completed Self-Study Guide (and required appendix information)that will be used in an upcoming site visit to this institution.Signature of person listed above: Date: 2
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTSGeneral Information Sheet.................................................................................................... Page 5Previous Site Visit Recommendations.................................................................................. Page 6Compliance with Commission Policies ................................................................................ Page 7Standard 1 – Institutional Commitment/Program Effectiveness/Affiliations..................... Page 8Standard 2 – Program Director and Teaching Staff.......................................................... Page 13Standard 3 – Facilities and Resources .............................................................................. Page 16Standard 4 – Curriculum and Program Duration .............................................................. Page 22Standard 5 – Advanced Education Students ..................................................................... Page 34Standard 6 – Research....................................................................................................... Page 37Summary of Self-Study Report........................................................................................... Page 38______________________________________________________________________________ APPENDICESStandard 1 – Institutional Commitment/Program Effectiveness/Affiliations: Appendix A – Educational mission and program’s goals and objectives.................................. Appendix B – Outcomes assessment plan, measurements and results ...................................... Appendix C – Administrative structure in an organizational chart ........................................... Appendix D – Success rate of graduates on the board examination.......................................... Appendix E – Affiliated institutions that participate in training students ................................. Appendix F – Other programs that rotate students through this organization........................... 3
  4. 4. Standard 2 – Program Director And Teaching Staff: Appendix G, Exhibit 2 – Program Director ............................................................................... Appendix H, Exhibit 3.1, 3.2 – Teaching Staff ......................................................................... Appendix I – Curriculum vitae of the program director and FTE teaching faculty .................. Appendix J – Monthly attending staff schedules....................................................................... Appendix K – Blank faculty evaluation form............................................................................Standard 3 – Facilities And Resources: Appendix L, Exhibit 4 – Facilities and Resources..................................................................... Appendix M, Exhibit 5 – Support Staff .....................................................................................Standard 4 – Curriculum And Program Duration: Appendix N, Exhibit 6 – Students’ Total Program Time .......................................................... Appendix O, Exhibit 7 – Sample Students’/Residents’ Schedules............................................ Appendix P, Exhibit 8 – Biomedical Sciences .......................................................................... Appendix Q – Schedule of department seminars, conferences, and/or lectures........................ Appendix R – Schedule of off-service assignments .................................................................. Appendix S – Information regarding Instruction and Clinical training.....................................Standard 5 – Advanced Education Students: Appendix T – Brochure, school catalog or formal description of program............................... Appendix U – Student evaluation form ..................................................................................... Appendix V – Written due process policies and procedures ..................................................... Appendix W – Material describing student rights and responsibilities..................................... 4
  5. 5. GENERAL INFORMATIONa. What is the length of the program? Months: 36 monthsb. How many full-time students are currently enrolled in the program per year? 9c. How many part-time students are currently enrolled in the program per year? N/Ad. The program offers a: Certificate: Degree: Both: Xe. What other programs does the organization sponsor? Indicate whether each program is accredited. Indicate which programs are accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation All recognized specialties: Pediatric Dentistry, Orthodontics, Prosthodontics,Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Endodontics. In addition Oral Medicineis offered as an M.S.D. program. AGED Program is ADA accredited.f. Check the type of program: 36-month X combined 45-month maxillofacial 12-month 5
  6. 6. PREVIOUS SITE VISIT RECOMMENDATIONSUsing the program’s previous site visit report, please demonstrate that therecommendations included in the report have been remedied.The suggested format for demonstrating compliance is to state the recommendation and thenprovide a narrative response and/or reference documentation within the remainder of this self-study document.* Please note if the last site visit was conducted prior to the implementation of the revisedAccreditation Standards for Advanced Specialty Education Programs (January 1, 2000), somerecommendations may no longer apply. Should further guidance be required, please contactCommission on Dental Accreditation staff. There were no recommendations during the last site visit. 6
  7. 7. COMPLIANCE WITH COMMISSION POLICIESPlease provide documentation demonstrating the program’s compliance with theCommission’s “Third Party Comments” and “Complaints” policies.A. Third Party CommentsThe program is responsible for soliciting third party comments from students and patients thatpertain to the Standards or policies and procedures used in the Commission’s accreditationprocess. An announcement for soliciting third party comments is to be published at least 90 daysprior to the site visit. The notice should indicate that third party comments are due in theCommission’s office no later than 60 days prior to the site visit. Please review the entire policyon “Third Party Comments” in the Commission’s EPP: Evaluation Policies and Proceduresmanual. 1. Please provide documentation and/or indicate what evidence will be available during the site visit to demonstrate compliance with the Commission’s policy on “Third Party Comments.”An announcement for soliciting third-party comments was posted in the graduateprosthodontics clinic on July 1, 2002. A copy of the flier is available on site.B. ComplaintsThe program is responsible for developing and implementing a procedure demonstrating thatstudents are notified, at least annually, of the opportunity and the procedures to file complaintswith the Commission. Additionally, the program must maintain a record of student complaintsrelated to the Commission’s accreditation standards and/or policy received since theCommission’s last comprehensive review of the program. Please review the entire policy on“Complaints” in the Commission’s EPP: Evaluation Policies and Procedures manual. 1. Please provide documentation and/or indicate what evidence will be available during the site visit to demonstrate compliance with the Commission’s policy on “Complaints.” (Copy of letter signed by all of the graduate students on file.) 7
  8. 8. STANDARD 1 – INSTITUTIONAL COMMITMENT/PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS(Please circle, bold or highlight YES, NO or N/A and identify documentation in support of youranswer. Appendices A-F are also required for this section. Note: required appendixinformation may serve as “documentary evidence” where appropriate.)1. Has the program developed clearly stated goals and objectives appropriate to YES advanced specialty education, addressing education, patient care, research and service? (1)Documentary Evidence: Program goals and objectives are part of the introductoryinformation sent to all applicants. These goals and objectives and reemphasized to theapplicants that are interviewed for positions in the program. Applicants can furtherexplore the program’s characteristics during their interview with individual faculty andresidents. Program content is contained in the University Bulletin (General Catalog). 1. To graduate clinicians who demonstrate proficiency with the diagnosis, treatment planning and treatment of Prosthodontic patients, with particular emphasis on the critical use of the existing literature and current knowledge. 2. To graduate clinicians, who demonstrate proficiency with the management of patients requiring Prosthodontic and implant treatment, as well as the long-term supportive therapy of these patients. 3. To provide the student with information in the basic sciences as a foundation for understanding the literature and adapting future advances into the clinical practice of Prosthodontics. 4. To thoroughly prepare residents to successfully take and pass the American Board of Prosthodontics. 5. To prepare students to work closely with general dentists and other specialties to the end that patients receive optimal care. 6. To graduate clinicians who generate, disseminate, preserve knowledge, and serve the community and profession.2. Is planning for, evaluation of and improvement of educational quality for the program broad-based, systematic, continuous and designed to promote achievement of program goals related to education, patient care, research YES and service? (1)The program outcomes assessment process has been ongoing. The program director andfull and half-time faculty at our quarterly faculty meetings review the outcome reports.These outcomes are discussed with the residents at our weekly meetings.Documentary Evidence: Minutes from these meetings are available for review. Theseoutcomes and the overall graduate program are discussed with the residents at our weeklymeetings. 8
  9. 9. 3. Does the program document its effectiveness using a formal and ongoing outcomes assessment process to include measures of advanced education YES student achievement? (1)Documentary Evidence: 1. Didactic course grades and evaluation measures are used to assess attainment of program objectives. 2. Quarterly chart reviews are done with each graduate student, along with review of their treatment plans and clinical documentation. 3. Grades and other competency measures are used to assess the attainment of clinical objectives. 4. Oral presentations are done each week in which graduate students provide with current Prosthodontic therapy, treatment planning, and short and long-term evaluation of previous therapy. Numerous faculty attend these presentations from both the periodontal and restorative departments. Each presenter is quizzed orally and graded on each aspect of the presentation as well as the overall presentation. 5. At the end of the course each graduate student is given a mock written Board Exam which is compared to that which was given at their interview. 6. All graduate students seeking a Master’s Degree must present their findings in a public forum and are encouraged to prepare a paper suitable for publication and submit an abstract for presentation at a national meeting. 7. All graduates are encouraged to take all parts of the American Board of Prosthodontics.4. Are the financial resources sufficient to support the program’s stated goals and objectives? (1) YESDocumentary Evidence: Our graduate clinic receives an ample budget based uponprojected needs that are historically determined. The budget is covered by clinic revenueand if revenue exceeds the projected budget, then the percentage of the additional revenueis returned. These additional funds can be made for major purchases and renovation ofportions of our clinic, as needed. We receive additional funding through our FellowshipProgram. These funds are used to cover items in the Graduate Program that are notcovered by existing funds.5. If applicable, are major changes as defined by the Commission reported N/A promptly to the Commission on Dental Accreditation? (1)Documentary Evidence: The last major change was the appointment of Dr. Keith Phillipsas Director in 1996. This was reported to the Commission. Documentation on file. 9
  10. 10. 6. Is the advanced specialty education program sponsored by an institution, which is properly chartered, and licensed to operate and offer instruction leading to YES degrees, diplomas or certificates with recognized education validity? (1)Documentary Evidence: The University of Washington and the School of Dentistry sponsorthe Prosthodontic program. The Commission on Dental Accreditation accredits the Schoolof Dentistry. The State of Washington charters the University of Washington and itscomponents schools and colleges.7. If a hospital is the sponsor, is the hospital accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations or its N/A equivalent? (1)Documentary Evidence: The Prosthodontic program is not sponsored by the hospital, butthe hospital is accredited by JCHAO.8. If an educational institution is the sponsor, is the educational institution accredited by an agency recognized by the United States Department YES of Education? (1)Documentary Evidence: Since 1918, the University of Washington has been a chartermember of the regional accrediting agency initially named the Northwest Association ofSecondary and High Schools and subsequently renamed the Northwest Association ofSchools and Colleges. The University of Washington’s last full-scale accreditationevaluation was in 1993. In 1998, following its five-year interim review, the University ofWashington received reaffirmation of its accreditation status. The University ofWashington is scheduled for its next full-scale, decennial accreditation review in April2003.9. If applicable, do the bylaws, rules and regulations of hospitals that sponsor or provide a substantial portion of advanced specialty education programs assure that dentists are eligible for medical staff membership and privileges N/A including the right to vote, hold office, serve on medical staff committees and admit, manage and discharge patients? (1)10. Is the position of the program in the administrative structure consistent with that YES of other parallel programs within the institution and does the administrator have the authority, responsibility and privileges necessary to manage the program? (1)Documentary Evidence: Flow Chart of the Graduate Programs and minutes from theDirector’s meetings are available for review. The Prosthodontic program is on equalfooting with the other post-doctoral programs within the institution. Meetings of theprogram directors are held monthly and are held as a useful forum for discussing program 10
  11. 11. operations. The Prosthodontic program has an equal vote on establishing policy anddetermining program direction within the institution.11. Does the primary sponsor of the educational program accept full responsibility YES for the quality of education provided in all affiliated institutions? (1)Documentary Evidence: The program director has the authority, responsibility andprivileges required to effectively administer the graduate program. Such authority,responsibility and privileges are consistent with the requirements of the Commission onAccreditation and with those of other program administrators within the School. Theprogram director is also the clinic director. The director approves all supplies for theprogram. The director reviews all time sheets and evaluations of staff. The directorreceives a monthly copy of the clinic budget and any other budgets as needed. The directorhas excellent support from the departmental chair and the departmental administrator. 11
  12. 12. AFFILIATIONS (If the program is not affiliated with other institutions, please skip this section and proceed to question 14.)Documentary Evidence:12. Is documentary evidence of agreements, approved by the sponsoring and N/A relevant affiliated institutions, available?Documentary Evidence:13. Are the following items covered in such inter-institutional agreements? (1) N/A a) Designation of a single program director; YES NO b) The teaching staff; YES NO c) The educational objectives of the program; YES NO d) The period of assignment of students; and YES NO e) Each institutions financial commitment. YES NODocumentary Evidence: N/A 12
  13. 13. STANDARD 2 - PROGRAM DIRECTOR AND TEACHING STAFF14. Is the program administered by a director who is board certified in the YES respective specialty of the program, or if appointed after January 1, 1997, has previously served as a program director? (2)Documentary Evidence: Copy of Board Certification February 2002 for Dr. Phillips is onfile. Appendix G (2-1)15. Does the program director have primary responsibility for the organization and execution of the educational and administrative components to the program? (2-1) YESDocumentary Evidence: The graduate students’ complete schedule is finalized by thedirector including approval of class registration. All decisions regarding curriculum,staffing and faculty selection fall under this responsibility. The director has a programcoordinator dedicated full time to the graduate program. The director has final approvalof the candidates for each class with input from faculty and graduate students.16. Does the program director devote sufficient time to: a) Participate in the student selection process, unless the program YES is sponsored by federal services utilizing a centralized student process;Applicants are selected on the basis of their pre-doctoral training accomplishments,national board scores, clinical experience since time of graduation, TOEFL score (ifinternational student), GRE scores and most importantly through an interview process bythe faculty, staff and graduate students during the interview process. The program hasaveraged approximately 30 candidates for the last 20 years from which to select for 2 to 4positions. All applications are forwarded to the Graduate School at the University ofWashington for evaluation to insure that they meet the University’s minimum standards. b) Develop and implement the curriculum plan to provide a diverse YES educational experience in biomedical and clinical sciences;The director takes time to develop and implement the curriculum. There have been somemodifications in the number of existing courses as well as adding several courses over thelast few years. In addition, the starting date of the program was changed to summerquarter in order to have the first-year graduate students take the summer institute bio-statistics courses. The students are present for the Periodontal Implant Literature coursefor three quarters and an Implant Clinical course with approval of the director. Thestudents are heavily involved with continuing dental education courses in the area, studyclubs, guest lecturers, as well as many Prosthodontic Societal meetings, in an effort toenhance the students’ exposure to their chosen specialty. The combined seminar withorthodontics, periodontics, and periodontics came about from initial discussion in thegraduate directors’ meetings. Clinical photography has also been moved to the summer 13
  14. 14. quarter and revised to provide instruction in digital photography. This was done to havethe students prepared to document their cases at the start of the autumn quarter as a resultof outcome assessment of goal #1. The growth of implants in our program, the number ofnew journal covering implants and the desire for information from both the periodonticsand prosthodontic residents has resulted in the expansion of the literature and didacticcourses related to dental implants. We have added an implant literature course that runsthree quarters per year for one hour and an implant course for two quarters that also hasan overview from each of the major dental companies incorporated during the summersession. In addition, we have taken advantage of continuing education course in the area,study clubs as well as the Prosthodontic Society meetings to enhance our residents’exposure to the specialty and to speakers with expert knowledge in various areas withinour specialty. c) Maintain a current copy of the curriculum’s goals, objectives, and YES content outlines.Copies of the curriculum’s goals, objectives and content outlines are maintained and madeavailable to all applicants through their Graduate Prosthodontic Manual. d) Maintain a record of the number and variety of clinical experiences YES accomplished by each student;Students, upon inception into the program, are made aware of the clinical procedures theyare required to successfully complete prior to graduation. Each student is given a ChartReview every quarter performed by the director, determining their progress to date. Aformal letter is issued to each student informing them of their current status with remedialrecommendations and suggestions if necessary. e) Ensure that the majority of faculty assigned to the program are YES educationally qualified prosthodontists;The majority of the faculty assigned to the program are alumni of this GraduateProsthodontic program and therefore very well equipped to carry-on the traditions,philosophies and ideologies shared by all those who preceded them. They are all proficientin their ability to teach, have master’s degrees in Prosthodontics, and currently treatpatients in their private practices maintaining the latest techniques. f) Provide written faculty evaluations at least annually to determine YES the effectiveness of the faculty in the educational program;Students and faculty are evaluated by each other, by the Director and by the departmentChair. Graduate students are encouraged to critique every course and their instructors inthese courses on a quarterly basis. These evaluations are an integral part of the outcomesassessment package. The director formally evaluates the graduate students quarterly inaddition to the grades they receive from the program director and course directors. 14
  15. 15. g) Conduct periodic staff meetings for the proper administration of YES the educational program; andGraduate faculty meetings are conducted by the Director on a quarterly basis. Subjectsentertained in these meetings include student progress, curricular changes, andadministrative matters.Graduate student and auxiliary staff meetings are held bi-monthly officiated by theDirector. The students and staff are encouraged to discuss any concerns they may have. h) Maintain adequate records of clinical supervision? (2-1.1) YESDocumentary Evidence: All clinical cases are documented in the record and cosigned by aninstructor. At the beginning of each quarter, faculty are assigned specific clinic times forstudent supervision.17. Does the program director encourage students to seek certification by the American Board of Prosthodontics? (2-2) YESDocumentary Evidence: Three of our recent graduates have taken Part I of the AmericanBoard of Prosthodontics.18. Is the number and time commitment of the teaching staff sufficient to: a) Provide didactic and clinical instruction to meet curriculum YES goals and objectives; and b) Provide supervision of all treatment provided by students through YES specific and regularly scheduled clinic assignments? (2-3)Documentary Evidence: Appendix H and Exhibit 3.1 and 3.2. The teaching staff isadequate to fulfill the program’s teaching commitment. 15
  16. 16. STANDARD 3 – FACILITIES AND RESOURCES19. Are institutional facilities and resources adequate to provide the educational experiences and opportunities required to fulfill the needs of the educational YES program as specified in the Accreditation Standards for Advanced Specialty Education Programs? (3)Documentary Evidence: The institutional commitment from the School of Dentistry, whichserves as the primary site for the advanced education programs, is substantial. Thefacilities and equipment are modern and well maintained. The quality and quantity offaculty are strengths of the program. Clinical and administrative staffing and overallfinancial support is adequate. Several phases of clinical and laboratory remodeling havebeen completed greatly enhancing the productivity.20. Are equipment and supplies for use in managing medical emergencies YES readily accessible and functional? (3)Documentary Evidence: All necessary equipment and drugs to handle medical emergenciesare easily accessible. Oxygen and first-aid are available in the clinic. In addition we are invery close proximity to the emergency room. Everyone has been well trained in basic lifesupport and the emergency team in the hospital responds very quickly to a phone call.21. Does the program document its compliance with the institution’s policy and applicable regulations of local, state and federal agencies, including but not limited to radiation hygiene and protection, ionizing radiation, hazardous YES materials, and bloodborne and infectious diseases? (3)Documentary Evidence: All radiographic facilities are designed to meet State ofWashington and the University’s radiation safety regulations. The Washington StateDivision of Radiation Protection inspects all radiation equipment at bi-annually and theDepartment of Environmental Health and Safety of the University of Washington inspectsannually. Inspection reports are filed with the Department of Environmental Health,Division of Radiation Safety. Copies of Radiation Inspections are on file. The institutionhas an ongoing program in infection control, patient and personnel protection protocol.Copies of course attendance to hazardous materials, bloodborne pathogen, and infectiousdisease courses are on file. 16
  17. 17. 22. Are the above policies provided to all students, faculty and appropriate YES support staff and continuously monitored for compliance? (3)Documentary Evidence: The University of Washington, School of Dentistry has had a strictinfection control policy for a number of years. In 1992, the current policy was publishedand recently revised. Monitoring of institutional asepsis and infection control policies andprocedures is the responsibility of the Health and Safety Committee, Dr. Frank Roberts,Sandy Phillips and Gwen Rikansrud.Monitoring of institutional hazard control in the patient care environment is theresponsibility of Sandy Phillips, Director of Clinical Operations and Gwen Rikansrud,Clinical Supervisor. In addition, the School of Dentistry is monitored by the University’sEnvironmental Health and Safety Department which ensures hazard control throughperiodic monitoring and by responding to requests for immediate assessment of potentialhazards in the patient care areas.23. Are policies on bloodborne and infectious diseases made YES available to applicants for admission and patients? (3)Documentary Evidence: All faculty, graduate students, and staff must have proper trainingbefore they can begin in the clinic. Both staff and faculty are responsible to ensurecompliance in the clinic. It is the policy of the University of Washington, School ofDentistry that all students, faculty, and staff care for patients within their level ofcompetence without regard to infectious disease status when it is appropriate to do so. Thestudent is provided with specific written and verbal instruction in the provision of oral careservices to patients with bloodborne infectious diseases. Specific strategies for treatment ofindividuals with an infectious disease are discussed with the supervisory faculty memberprior to treatment. The Office of Clinical Affairs provides instruction for all graduatestudents regarding bloodborne infectious diseases. Universal precautions procedures arestrictly enforced in the clinic.24. Are students, faculty and appropriate support staff encouraged to be immunized against and/or tested for infectious diseases, such as mumps, measles, rubella and hepatitis B, prior to contact with patients and/or infectious objects or materials, in an effort to minimize the risk to patients YES and dental personnel? (3)Documentary Evidence: Dental School and Health Science Center Policy cover thesepolicies and are monitored by the Dean’s Office and formal records are maintained by theUniversity Health Clinic. 17
  18. 18. 25. Are all students, faculty and support staff involved in the direct provision of patient care continuously recognized/certified in basic life YES support procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation? (3)Documentary Evidence: All students, faculty and staff are required to keep their CPRcertificate updated. Continuously recognized/certified in basic life support procedures aremonitored at the departmental level and on file in the department. Several classes areoffered each year and are a mandatory requirement for graduate students.26. Are private office facilities used as a means of providing clinical experiences NO in advanced specialty education? (3)Documentary Evidence: Graduate students are encouraged to visit private practices toobserve patient and practice management skills of different specialists. Several alumni ofthe program offer their private practice facilities to the students to enable them to overseethe workings of a private-practice setting and the patient treatment that ensues. A recentmentoring program is being established through the University of Washington GraduateProsthodontic Alumni Association. The intent is to help support graduate studentsthroughout their training and to better learn the aspects of running a private practice.27. Do physical facilities permit students to operate under circumstances prevailing in the practice of prosthodontics? (3-1) YESDocumentary Evidence: The institutional commitment from the School of Dentistry, whichserves as the primary site for the advanced education program is substantial. The facilitiesand equipment are modern and well-maintained. The quality and quantity of faculty arethe strengths of the program. Clinical and administrative staffing and overall financialsupport is adequate.28. Are the clinical facilities specifically identified for the advanced education program in prosthodontics? (3-1.1) YESDocumentary Evidence: Yes, the Graduate Prosthodontic clinic is totally set-apart from theadjacent undergraduate clinic. It houses its own patient reception area, laboratory facility,operatories, radiographic site and work areas. It is fully self-contained.29. Are there a sufficient number of completely equipped operatories to accommodate the number of students enrolled? (3-1.2) YESDocumentary Evidence: Yes, there are 7 operatories to adequately facilitate the studentsenrolled. 18
  19. 19. 30. Are the laboratory facilities specifically identified for the advanced education program in prosthodontics? (3-1.3) YESDocumentary Evidence: A separate laboratory facility is adjacent to the clinical facility. Itis specifically identified for use by the graduate students in the advanced educationprogram in Prosthodontics.31. Is the laboratory equipped to support the fabrication of most prostheses required in the program? (3-1.4) YESDocumentary Evidence: The laboratory is equipped to perform all phases of prosthesesfabrication with the exception of removable partial denture frameworks.32. Is there sufficient laboratory space to accommodate the number of students enrolled in the program, including provisions for storage of personal and laboratory armamentaria. (3-1.5) YESDocumentary Evidence: The Graduate Prosthodontic laboratory facility has adequateseating for each graduate student. The main laboratory area has 12 benches. There is aseparate porcelain room with three fully equipped benches and a separate research areawith two fully equipped benches. Each bench is equipped with multiple drawers forarmamentaria and each student is issued a locked cabinet to maintain personal items.33. Is radiographic equipment for extra-and intraoral radiographs accessible to the student? (3-2) YESDocumentary Evidence: Radiographic imaging facilities are available from a number ofsources. CAT facilities are available through the University Hospital and the School ofMedicine. Tomographic and general radiographic services such as panographic films andcomprehensive dental radiographic surveys are available through the radiographic serviceof the Department of Oral Medicine. In addition, there is an x-ray machine in the clinic forthe purpose of making localized radiographs. All radiographic facilities are designed tomeet University and State of Washington radiation safety regulations. All radiationequipment is inspected annually by the Department of Environmental Health and Safety ofthe University of Washington and at least every second year by the Washington StateDivision of Radiation Protection. Inspection reports are filed with the Department ofEnvironmental Health, Division of Radiation Safety. CT scans along with Simplantsoftware are available from First Hill, Bellevue, and Everett Radiology Service. Theseservices are approximately 5 to 15 miles from the dental school. 19
  20. 20. 34. Is lecture, seminar, study space and administrative office space available for the conduct of the educational program? (3-3) YESDocumentary Evidence: The 7th Floor of the D-wing houses Restorative Dentistry, whichhas recently been reconstructed and remodeled. For lectures and seminars, the graduatestudents are scheduled in either of the two large conference rooms. They have access to thedepartmental library and the Health Sciences Library. The Department of Prosthodonticsalso has a laboratory facility, fully equipped study library and conference room for thestudent’s use.35. Do library resources include access to a diversified selection of current dental, biomedical, and other pertinent reference material? (3-4) YESDocumentary Evidence: The Health Sciences Library and Information Center has acomplete and diversified section related to dentistry in both texts and bound journals. Thelibrary is within a very short walking distance and easily accessible. The Department ofProsthodontics has a very functional and currently maintained library of dentalpublications readily available to all Prosthodontic students.36. Do library resources also include access to appropriate current and back issues of major scientific journals as well as equipment for retrieval and duplication of information? (3-4.1) YESDocumentary Evidence: Yes, both facilities referred to in #35 above have both current andback issues of all of the major dental journals and textbooks and duplicating equipment tocopy articles.37. Do the facilities include access to computer, photographic, and audiovisual resources for educational, administrative, and research support. (3-5) YESDocumentary Evidence: A complete spectrum of reproduction services is available throughthe department, the School of Dentistry and the Magnuson Health Sciences Center. Thedepartment has excellent resources. This list of major equipment is available to graduatestudents. 1. Flatbed scanner 2. Slide maker for Power Point slides 3. Slide scanner to convert slides to digital image 4. Two computers 5. Large server for storage of digital images 6. C-D Rom – reader/writer 7. Video camera/digital by reservation 8. Xerox Copier 20
  21. 21. 38. Are adequate allied dental personnel assigned to the program to ensure clinical and laboratory technical support? (3-6) YESDocumentary Evidence: We have one clinical supervisor, two full-time dental assistants,one part-time dental assistants, one part-time dental hygienist, two full-time RemovableProsthodontic technicians and two part-time dental ceramists.39. Is secretarial and clerical assistance sufficient to meet the educational and administrative needs of the program? (3-7) YESDocumentary Evidence: We have one full-time program coordinator and one part-timeprogram coordinator.40. Is laboratory technical support sufficient to ensure efficient operation of the clinical program and meet the needs of the program? (3-8) YES Documentary Evidence: As part of their training, the students are required to fabricate some of their own laboratory cases themselves. They are supported by faculty-trained in dental technology as well as the two removable Prosthodontic technicians and two part-time dental ceramic technicians. We utilize the services of several proficient laboratories in the immediate area for those cases that the students are not required to perform themselves. The lines of communication are excellent between the students and the laboratories and the work is performed to our specifications in a timely manner. 21
  22. 22. STANDARD 4 - CURRICULUM AND PROGRAM DURATION41. Is the advanced specialty education program designed to provide special knowledge and skills beyond the D.D.S. or D.M.D. training and oriented to the accepted standards of specialty practice as set forth in the Accreditation YES Standards for Advanced Specialty Education Programs? (4)Documentary Evidence: The educational experience provided by the graduate program iscompletely separate from the undergraduate dental program. The level of training in thegraduate program is in keeping with specialty standards.42. Is the level of specialty area instruction in the graduate and postgraduate YES programs comparable? (4)Documentary Evidence: The level of clinical training is equal. The only difference is theresearch requirement to obtain the master’s degree.43. Is documentation of all program activities assured by the program director YES and available for review? (4)Documentary Evidence: All didactic schedules are available with learning objectives andoutcome assessments.44. If the institution/program enrolls part-time students, does the institution N/Ahave guidelines regarding enrollment of part-time students? (4)Documentary Evidence: N/A The program does not have part-time students.45 If the institution/program enrolls part-time students, do they start and complete the program within a single institution, except when the program is discontinued? (4) N/ADocumentary Evidence: N/A46. If the institution/program enrolls students on a part-time basis, does the director of an accredited program assure that: a) the educational experiences, including the clinical experiences and N/A responsibilities, are the same as required by full-time students; and b) there are an equivalent number of months spent in the program? (4) N/ADocumentary Evidence: N/A There are no part-time students. 22
  23. 23. PROGRAM DURATION47. If applicable, does the postdoctoral program in prosthodontics encompass a minimum of 33 months? (4-1) YESDocumentary Evidence: The Graduate Prosthodontic program is 36 months in durationcommencing Summer quarter. Students are registered for a minimum of three yearsincluding approximately 8-10 weeks of annual downtime being included. Table 4-1.48. If applicable, does the postdoctoral program in prosthodontics that includes integrated maxillofacial training encompass a minimum N/A of 45 months? (4-2)Documentary Evidence: N/A49. If applicable, is the 12-month postdoctoral program in maxillofacial prosthetics preceded by successful completion of an accredited N/A prosthodontics program? (4-3)Documentary Evidence: N/A 23
  24. 24. CURRICULUM50. Is the curriculum designed to enable the student to attain skills representative of a clinician proficient in the theoretical and practical aspects of prosthodontics? (4-4) YESDocumentary Evidence: The theoretical and practical aspects of prosthodontics arecovered under a number of graduate level courses. They include: R.D. 570 – Restorative Review of the Literature R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar R.D. 585 – Dental Materials R.D. 588 - Masticatory Functional Analysis and Occlusal Adjustment R.D. 589 – Review of the Literature in Occlusion R.D. 590 – Fundamentals in Fixed Prosthodontics R.D. 600 – Independent Study/Research R.D. 660 – Oral Rehabilitation51. Are written goals and objectives developed for all instruction included in this curriculum? (4-4.1) YESDocumentary Evidence: All courses have written goals and learning objectives on file.52. Are content outlines developed for all didactic portions of the program? (4-4.2) YESDocumentary Evidence: All didactic portions have content outlines developed and are onfile.53. Do students prepare and present diagnostic data, treatment plans and the results of patient treatment? (4-4.3) YESDocumentary Evidence: Students present their patient therapies in R.D. 580 - TreatmentPlanning Seminar, and are well trained to properly diagnose their patients’ dental needs,determine the treatment plan and discuss long-term therapy and prognosis for both fixedand removable prosthodontic patients.54. Is the time devoted to didactic instruction and research at least 30% of the total educational experience? (4-4.4) YESDocumentary Evidence: 30% of the total educational experience is devoted to didacticinstruction and 5% is devoted to research. 24
  25. 25. 55. Is a minimum of 60% of the total program time devoted to providing patient services, including direct patient care and laboratory procedures? (4-4.5) YESDocumentary Evidence: 40% of the total program is devoted to clinical instruction and20% to laboratory activities. DIDACTIC PROGRAM: BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES56. Is instruction provided at the understanding level in each of the following? a) Head and neck anatomy; YES b) Oral pathology; YES c) Applied pharmacology; and YES d) Craniofacial physiology? (4-5) YESDocumentary Evidence: Head & Neck Anatomy: Ortho 580 – Surgical Anatomy Oral Pathology: ORAL B 574 – Clinical Stomatology Applied Pharmacology: PROS 572 – Special Topics in Prosthodontics –Lectures in Pain and Inflammation Control Craniofacial Physiology: PROS 572 – Special Topics in Prosthodontics - Lectures in TMD and non -TMD Facial Pain R.D. 570 – Restorative Review of the Literature R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar R.D. 588 – Masticatory Functional Analysis and Occlusal Adjustment R.D. 589 – Review of the Literature in Occlusion 25
  26. 26. DIDACTIC PROGRAM: PROSTHODONTICS AND RELATED DISCIPLINES57. Is instruction provided at the in-depth level in each of the following: a. Fixed prosthodontics; YES b. Implant prosthodontics; YES c. Occlusion; and YES d. Removable prosthodontics (4-7) YESDocumentary Evidence: Fixed Prosthodontics; R.D. 570 – Review of the Literature R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar R.D. 585 – Prosthodontic Dental Materials R.D. 590 – Fundamentals in Fixed Prosthodontics R.D. 660 – Oral Rehabilitation Implant Prosthodontics; PERIO 577 Implant Review of the Literature R.D. 570 – Review of the Literature PROS 571 – Prosthodontic Literature Review R.D. 590 – Fundamentals of Fixed Prosthodontics R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 582 – Periodontal Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 585 – Periodontal Therapy Seminar PERIO 586 – Longitudinal Evaluation of Periodontal Therapy Occlusion; R.D. 580 – Treatment Planning Seminar R.D. 588 – Masticatory Functional Analysis and Occlusal Adjustment, R.D. 589 – Review of the Literature in Occlusion R.D. 590 – Fundamentals in Fixed Prosthodontics Removable Prosthodontics; R.D. 585 – Prosthodontic Dental Materials R. D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar PROS 560 – Complete and Immediate Dentures PROS 562 – Removable Partial Dentures PROS 571 – Prosthodontic Literature Review PROS 660 – Clinical Prosthodontics 26
  27. 27. 58. Is instruction provided at the understanding level in each of the following: a. Biomaterials; YES b. Geriatrics; YES c. Maxillofacial prosthetics; YES d. Preprosthetic surgery including implant placement; YES e. Temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain; YES f. Medical emergencies; and YES g. Diagnostic radiology? (4-8) YESDocumentary Evidence: Biomaterials: R.D. 585 – Dental Materials R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar R.D. 590 – Fundamentals of Fixed Prosthodontics Geriatrics: PROS 570 – Prosthodontic Review of the Literature PROS 572 – Special Topics Related to Prosthodontics Maxillofacial Prosthetics: PROS 563 – Maxillofacial Prosthetics I PROS 564 – Maxillofacial Prosthetics II PROS 570 – Prosthodontics Review of the Literature R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar Preprosthetic Surgery Including Implant Placement: PERIO 577 – Implant Review of the Literature R.D. 570 – Restorative Review of the Literature R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar R.D. 590 – Fundamentals in Fixed Prosthodontics PROS 570 – Prosthodontic Review of the Literature PERIO 582 – Periodontal Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 585 – Periodontal Therapy Seminar PERIO 586 – Longitudinal Evaluation of Periodontal Therapy PERIO 663 – Pre-Prosthodontics Clinical Periodontics 27
  28. 28. Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain R.D. 588 – Masticatory Functional Analysis and Occlusal Adjustment R.D. 589 – Review of the Literature in Occlusion PERIO 574 – Clinical Stomatology PROS 572 – Special Topics in Prosthodontics Medical Emergencies: CPR Certification Medical Emergency Course through Hospital Dentistry Diagnostic Radiology: ORAL B 574 – Clinical Stomatology R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 582 – Periodontal Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 585 – Periodontal Therapy Seminar ORTHO 582 – Adult Orthodontics (Note: Consultations are performed with faculty in Dental Radiology.)59. Is instruction provided at the familiarity level in each of the following: a. Biostatistics; YES b. Endodontics; YES c. Periodontics; YES d. Practice management; YES e. Research methodology; and YES f. Orthodontics (4-9) YESDocumentary Evidence: Biostatistics: DPHS 550 – Personal Computing Applications DPHS 568 – Dental Biostatistics DPHS 569 – Epidemiology Endodontics: PROS 572 – Special Topics in Prosthodontics R.D. 590 – Fundamentals in Fixed Prosthodontics 28
  29. 29. Periodontics: PERIO 574 – Oral Microbiology and the Normal Periodontium, PERIO 576 – Pathogenesis of Periodontics PERIO 582 – Periodontal Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 585 – Periodontal Therapy Seminar PERIO 586 – Longitudinal Evaluation of Periodontal Therapy Practice Management; PROS 572 – Special Topics in Prosthodontics R.D. 570 – Restorative Review of the Literature Research Methodology; R.D. 600 – Independent Study/Research DPHS 550 – Personal Computing Applications DPHS 568 – Dental Biostatistics DPHS 569 – Epidemiology Orthodontics: ORTHO 582 – Adult Orthodontics R.D. 590 – Fundamentals in Fixed Prosthodontics (Weekly seminars with Dr. Ward Smalley) CLINICAL PROGRAM60. Does the program provide sufficient clinical experiences for the student to be proficient in the comprehensive treatment of a wide range of complex prosthodontic patients with various categories of need? (4-11) YESDocumentary Evidence: DENT 565 – Dental Photography and Imaging PROS 560 – Complete Dentures PROS 564 – Maxillofacial Prosthetics II PROS 660 – Clinical Prosthodontics R.D. 588 – Masticatory Functional Analysis and Occlusal Adjustment R.D. 660 – Oral Rehabilitation PERIO 663 – Pre-Prosthodontic Clinical Periodontics Clinical work and treatment plans are presented in weekly seminars before an interdisciplinary faculty. These are: R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 582 – Periodontal Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 585 – Periodontal Therapy Seminar PERIO 586 – Longitudinal Evaluation of Periodontal Therapy 29
  30. 30. ORTHO 582 – Adult Orthodontics61. Does the program provide sufficient clinical experiences for the student to be proficient in: a. Collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting diagnostic data; YES b. Determining a diagnosis and prognosis; YES c. Developing a comprehensive treatment plan; YES d. Evaluating critically the results of treatment; and YES e. Effectively utilizing the professional services of allied dental personnel, including but not limited to dental laboratory technicians, dental assistants, and dental hygienists? (4-12) YESDocumentary Evidence: DENT 565 – Dental Photography and Imaging PROS 560 – Complete Dentures PROS 564 – Maxillofacial Prosthetics II PROS 660 – Clinical Prosthodontics R.D. 588 – Masticatory Functional Analysis and Occlusal Adjustment R.D. 660 – Oral Rehabilitation PERIO 663 – Pre-Prosthodontic Clinical Periodontics Clinical work and treatment plans are presented in weekly seminars before an interdisciplinary faculty. These are: R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 582 – Periodontal Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 585 – Periodontal Therapy Seminar PERIO 586 – Longitudinal Evaluation of Periodontal Therapy ORTHO 582 – Adult Orthodontics62. Does the program provide sufficient clinical experiences for the student to be proficient in each of the following and does the program also provide sufficient experiences for the student to become competent in laboratory phases for the following: a. Use of adjustable articulators to develop an integrated occlusion for opposing arches; YES b. Complete and partial coverage restorations; YES c. Restoration of endodontically treated teeth; YES 30
  31. 31. d. Fixed prosthodontics, which include; YES e. Removable partial dentures; YES f. Complete dentures; YES g. Implant supported and/or retained prostheses; YES h. Continual care and maintenance of restorations? (4-13) YESDocumentary Evidence: DENT 565 - Dental Photography and Imaging PROS 560 – Complete Dentures PROS 564 – Maxillofacial Prosthetics II PROS 660 – Clinical Prosthodontics R.D. 588 – Masticatory Functional Analysis and Occlusal Adjustment R.D. 660 – Oral Rehabilitation PERIO 663 – Pre-Prosthodontic Clinical Periodontics Clinical work and treatment plans are presented in weekly seminars before an interdisciplinary faculty. These are: R.D. 580 – Restorative Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 582 – Periodontal Treatment Planning Seminar PERIO 585 – Periodontal Therapy Seminar PERIO 586 – Longitudinal Evaluation of Periodontal Therapy ORTHO 582 – Adult Orthodontics63. Are students competent in the prosthodontic treatment of geriatric YES patients? (4-14)Documentary Evidence: PROS 560 – Complete Dentures PROS 660 – Clinical Prosthodontics R.D. 588 – Masticatory Functional Analysis and Occlusal Adjustment R.D. 660 – Oral Rehabilitation PROS 572 – Special Topics in Prosthodontics64. Are students competent in the prosthodontic treatment of patients with temporomandibular disorders and/or oral facial pain? (4-15) YES 31
  32. 32. Documentary Evidence: PROS 660 – Clinical Prosthodontics R.D. 588 – Masticatory Functional Analysis and Occlusal Adjustment R.D. 660 – Oral Rehabilitation PROS 572 – Special Topics in Prosthodontics Patients with TMD and Non-TMD facial pain are evaluated and treated conjointly with faculty and residents in the Oral Medicine department.65. Are students exposed to patients requiring various maxillofacial prosthetic services? (4-16) YESDocumentary Evidence: PROS 564 – Maxillofacial Prosthetics II PROS 660 – Clinical Prosthodontics There are maxillofacial patients treated in the Graduate clinic under supervision of maxillofacial prosthodontists. Other exposure is through the maxillofacial private practice within the dental school.66. Are students exposed to preprosthetic surgical procedures? (4-17) YESDocumentary Evidence: PERIO 663 – Pre-Prosthodontic Clinical Periodontics Students are taught surgical technique and perform preprosthetic surgery such as clinical crown lengthening, frenectomy, alveoplasty and dental implant placement. 32
  33. 33. MAXILLOFACIAL PROSTHETICS Note: Application of these Standards to programs of various scope/length is as follows: a. Prosthodontics programs that encompass a minimum of forty-five months that include integrated maxillofacial prosthetic training: all sections of these Standards apply; b. Prosthodontics programs that encompass a minimum of thirty-three months: all sections of these Standards apply except questions 67-75, inclusive; c. Twelve-month maxillofacial prosthetic programs: all sections of these Standards apply except questions 56-66 inclusive. PROGRAM DURATION67. Is the advanced education program in maxillofacial prosthetics provided with a forty-five month integrated prosthodontic program which includes fixed prosthodontics, removable prosthodontics, implant prosthodontics and maxillofacial prosthetic experiences; or a one-year program devoted specifically to maxillofacial prosthetics which follow completion of a prosthodontic program? (4-18) NODocumentary Evidence: N/AQuestions 68-75 are non-applicable. 33
  34. 34. STANDARD 5 - ADVANCED EDUCATION STUDENTS ELIGIBILITY AND SELECTION76. Are dentists with the following qualifications eligible to enter the advanced specialty education program accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation: a. Graduates from institutions in the U.S. accredited by the Commission YES on Dental Accreditation; b. Graduates from institutions in Canada accredited by the Commission YES on Dental Accreditation of Canada; and c. Graduates of foreign dental schools who possess equivalent YES educational background and standing as determined by the institution and program? (5)Documentary Evidence: A copy of the application requirements are on file. We havestudents in all three categories enrolled at this time.77. Is advanced placement or credit by examination granted in accordance with institution and Commission policies (Advanced Standing Policy N/A revised by CDA 01/30/01).Documentary Evidence: N/A 34
  35. 35. EVALUATION78. Does a system of ongoing evaluation and advancement assure that, through the director and faculty, each program: a. Periodically, but at least semiannually, evaluates the knowledge, skills and professional growth of its students, using appropriate written YES criteria and procedures; b. Provides to students an assessment of their performance, at least YES semiannually; d. Advances students to positions of higher responsibility only on the YES basis of an evaluation of their readiness for advancement; and e. Maintains a personal record of evaluation for each student which is YES accessible to the student and available for review during site visits? (5)Documentary Evidence: Formal student evaluations are submitted at least semi-annually.In addition, residents and program director receive a copy of their grades at the end ofeach quarter. General performance evaluations are performed by a chart review eachquarter. The outcome of each chart review is submitted in written form to each student.The director meets bi-monthly with the students to discuss general performance of thegroup and receives equal feed back from the students on the appraisal of the program.Minutes of these meetings are available on site. DUE PROCESS79. Are there specific written due process policies and procedures for adjudication of academic and disciplinary complaints, which parallel those established YES by the sponsoring institution? (5)Documentary Evidence: As part of orientation, a copy of the due process policy is providedby the graduate school. The graduate school has a policy handbook and a website wherethis information is available. The dental school handbook and the graduate programmanual are also provided to each graduate. These contain information about tuition,stipend or other compensation; vacation and sick leave; professional liability coverage; dueprocess policy and current accreditation status of the program.Web site: http://www.grad.washington.edu/ 35
  36. 36. RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES80. At the time of enrollment, are the advanced specialty education students apprised, in writing of the educational experience to be provided, including the nature of assignments to other departments or institutions and teaching YES commitments? (5)Documentary Evidence: Upon inception, the students are pre-registered by the ProgramCoordinator and provided with a Didactic and Clinical schedule for the duration of theprogram including course descriptions and objectives. They are given an orientation whichacquaints them with the various facilities they will be utilizing and they are apprised ofschool policies and procedures. Each student is given a Graduate Student Policy Manualand graduate school handbook. Copies are on file.81. Are all advanced specialty education students provided with written information which affirms their obligations and responsibilities to the YES institution, the program and program faculty? (5)Documentary Evidence: This information is provided during orientation and is included inthe Graduate Program Manual on-site. 36
  37. 37. STANDARD 6 – RESEARCH82. Do advanced specialty education students engage in scholarly activity? (6) YESDocumentary Evidence: Our graduate program provides all residents the opportunity toengage in research as part of the requirements to be awarded a Master of Science inDentistry degree. A list of graduates who have received an M.S.D. is on file. 37
  38. 38. SUMMARY OF SELF-STUDY REPORTNote: This summary culminates the self-study report in a qualitative appraisal andanalysis of the program’s strengths and weakness. INSTITUTION-RELATED1. Assess the adequacy of institutional support for the program. The program has and continues to receive great institutional support. We have maintained our FTE strength and now have an additional 1/2FTE. The laboratory remodel that occurred in 1998 came mainly from other than department funds. Support from clinical and patient care services has been excellent. Referral and coordination between departments and pre-doctoral program has been very good and when problems have arisen, the staff has been very proactive in taking corrective action.2. Assess whether the program is achieving goals through training beyond pre-doctoral level. The graduate program is achieving its goals through training beyond the pre- doctoral. Other than the basic science courses none of the faculty that function in the graduate program teaches in the pre-doctoral program. The graduate program is literature and seminar based. Close working relationships with the other graduate programs and pre-doctoral students insure a high level of training in the prosthodontic graduate program.3. Assess whether the program is achieving goals through stated competencies. We ensure that the goals of the program are achieved by documenting that the graduate students become competent with the objectives of the program. The objectives of the program are provided to the graduate students at the initiation of their program and annually thereafter. As stated in the document, the program has many different measures of resident progress and whether or not the program goals are being achieved. These measures are considered to be adequate.4. Assess whether the program is achieving goals through stated proficiencies. The program abides by the stated proficiencies in the accreditation standards for the advanced specialty education programs in Prosthodontics. These proficiencies are adequately measured by the outcomes that are used to assess the students. In addition, they take a mock written examination to assess prosthodontic proficiency. All major patient therapies are assessed for proficiency and graded by faculty in a mock board fashion.5. Assess whether the program is achieving goals through outcomes. Sufficient outcome measures exist to assure that the program is achieving the goals. Since 1999, we began encouraging students take part I of the American Boards. To date three of three have passed. We are confident the others will also challenge the board in the near future. Through surveys all graduates are working in their 38
  39. 39. specialty and most are active within organized dentistry. Having the graduate students’ feedback on a weekly basis and the feedback from the mock written exam have been the most helpful outcomes for the director and faculty to assess and make changes in the program.6. Assess calibration among program directors and faculty in the student evaluation process to ensure consistency of the evaluation process. The faculty does no formal calibration. The faculty continually discuss student progress. All faculty members are involved with each graduate student allowing them to each independently assess the students. Formal calibration would only be necessary if different faculty were assessing different students. All of the faculty both in graduate prosthodontics and periodontics attend oral presentations given by the graduate students three days a week and the faculty routinely discuss the resident’s performance after the presentation. Grading and verbal opinion have been consistently uniform over the course of the past six years.7. Assess the faculty evaluation process to ensure consistency of the evaluation process. The graduate students are asked to confidentially evaluate each faculty member yearly. The Program Director and Chairman transmit these to the individual faculty.8. Assess the institution’s policies on advanced education students. The School of Dentistry’s policies on advanced education students support quality education in the graduate level programs. The Graduate Program Directors meet regularly and monitor the individual needs of the various programs within the School, establishing policy in this area. The Program Directors are devoted to the development of a strong basic science background, advanced diagnostic and clinical competence, and particularly to developing specialists that have an integrated knowledge and appreciation of the role of the other specialties relative to their own specialty practice. The institution provides significant support administratively, physically and financially. In 2000, the Dental School received full accreditation from the Graduate School to continue offering the Masters Degree in Dentistry to our residents. The evaluation process was very thorough and we received full accreditations from the Graduate School. The Graduate Directors Committee was given a seat on the Dental School’s Executive Committee, which gave this committee a more official position within the structure of the Dental School.9. Assess the institution’s policies on eligibility and selection. All applicants for admission are considered without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, or age. Resident selection is made from a pool of applicants that meets the published requirements for application to the program. Those selected show the desire and promise of ability to pursue advanced studies in the specialty. The institution has allowed the selection process to be at the discretion of the Graduate Director. The Director has always sought the advice and consent of the faculty in the selection process. The director believes this process has insured the best candidates are given priority for a position in the program. The Graduate 39
  40. 40. School sets eligibility standards and reviews the credentials of each candidate. Our graduate students have always met the Graduate Schools standards.10. Assess the institution’s policies on due process. Institutional academic policies include due process procedures for academic and disciplinary matters and apply equally to all advanced education programs. The policy is included in the Graduate Student Handbook. The procedures clearly outline specific actions to be taken within the program and the institution that insure timely and fair adjudication of academic and disciplinary matters.11. Assess the institution’s policies on student rights and responsibilities. Institutional academic policies include a delineation of student rights and responsibilities. These are detailed in the Graduate Student Handbook, in which the students are also referred to other University and School resources.12. Assess the adequacy and accessibility, hours of operation and scope of holdings of the sponsoring institution’s library resources. Graduate Students have ready access to the Health Sciences Library, which is accessible to the School of Dentistry by hallways and elevators. The HSL offers a full range of services and resources in support of the educational, research, and clinical programs. The library remains open seven days per week. The library maintains an extensive collection of reference materials, journals, books, audiovisuals, and electronic resources. Dental resources are well represented. The library is more than adequate for all our advanced education needs. The Departments of Prosthodontics, Restorative Dentistry and Periodontics also maintain libraries that focus on texts and journals specific to prosthodontics and periodontics.13. Assess the institutional oversight of the quality of training at affiliated institutions. N/A 40
  41. 41. PATIENT CARE1. Assess the institution’s/program’s preparedness to manage medical emergencies. We are part of the Magnuson Health Science Center and we are instructed to dial 9- 911 in an emergency situation and expect an immediate response from the hospital. Our program has well-trained faculty, staff and students to manage emergencies. Our clinic has well-maintained emergency including oxygen and an emergency kit.2. Assess the adequacy of radiographic services and protection for patients, advanced education students and staff. The institution, Prosthodontic clinic and community (CT scan) have excellent radiographic services. All of the equipment is tested at least annually. We have sensors near radiographic equipment and staff involved in radiographic services wear radiation measurement badges and are shielded by a protective distance and barriers. Patients are protected with a lead apron and collar.3. Assess the program’s capacity for four-handed dentistry. The chair side assistance requirements are excellent. The existing full and part-time staff insures competent and immediate assistance for all major procedures.4. Assess the institution’s policies and procedures on hazardous materials, and bloodborne and infectious diseases for patients, advanced education students and staff. These policies are adequate and the committees that teach and monitor these concerns are proactive within the institution. The clinical staff, faculty and graduate students are all well trained and receive a yearly updated review.5. Assess how students may be able to apply ethical, legal and regulatory concepts in the provision, prevention and/or support of oral health care. Our program is international and multicultural; the issues of ethical, legal, and regulatory local standards are discussed in the everyday clinical experience, more directly in the three weekly clinical seminars and literature review. The diversity in our program is one of its many strengths. New residents assist other residents during the first summer quarter. This allows for the students to see our policies and ethics practiced in action before they began patient care. 41
  42. 42. PROGRAM-RELATED1. Assess the student’s time distribution among each program activity (e.g., didactic, clinical, teaching, research) and how well it is working. The distribution of activity for the students is adequate as assessed by the various outcomes that measure didactic, clinical and research activity and achievement.2. Assess the volume and variety of the program’s patient pool. The program currently has an enormous pool of patients wanting treatment. The therapies required by these patients are varied, interesting and sometimes unique. The receptionist maintains a patient waiting list and assigns patients. The fee structure in the clinic is about half of the specialty community and is an incentive for many patients to seek complex full-mouth reconstruction, implants or dentures.3. Assess the program’s student/faculty ratio. We hired an assistant director who spends 95% of his time on the clinic floor overseeing patient treatment, teaching and advising the students and overseeing the laboratory cases. We maintain at least two graduate faculty members on the floor at all times. Faculty who are not assigned on the clinic floor at any given time are readily accessible in their offices on the 7th floor of the D-wing, should the need arise.4. Assess the program’s student pool. The student pool has remained constant for over twenty-five years. Many graduate programs are offering substantial stipends so occasionally we will lose a top candidate to another school. We offer the David Wands Scholarship to American citizens who wish to contribute two years of full-time teaching.5. Assess rotations, electives and extramural experiences of the program. The Washington State Society of Prosthodontists, Pacific Coast Society of Prosthodontics and American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontics warmly welcome our students. Some of the Prosthodontic specialists in the area routinely invite the graduate students for presentations they are giving. Our graduate students are allowed to attend Dental School CDE courses at no cost on space available basis. The prosthodontists in the community have always been very generous in allowing the students to visit their offices.6. Assess the program’s record keeping and retention practices. Record keeping and retention practices are excellent. The Program has a longstanding practice of collecting follow-up records. Our hygienist maintains all records on patients that complete comprehensive care in the graduate program. Many of these patients are seen on recall visits by a graduate student or faculty and most of the files are used in our Friday morning Seminar “Longitudinal Evaluation of Periodontal Therapy.”7. Assess the research activities of the program. 42
  43. 43. The department has funds available that cover the cost of most resident researchrelated costs. We have a well-funded research faculty that provides a wide varietyof opportunities for a resident’s research experience. Residents have had theirresearch published in peer reviewed prosthodontic journals and have presented inoral and poster sessions at major prosthodontic meetings. 43

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