Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Dr Peter Jansen
FRNZCGP (Dist) FRACMA
Senior Medical Advisor
Māori Health Disparities
Introduction

Māori have the greatest levels of health inequality
in New Zealand, with measures of mortality and
morbidit...
Māori Health

Māori spend a relatively greater proportion of
their shorter lives disabled.

Higher burden of illness tha...
GP Treatment
A Study from New Zealand published in 2002 shows that while Māori can be
diagnosed at the same rate as non-Mā...
Lower Access for Māori to ACC
GP GP Rura Physio A & M Emergency Transport Hospital Chiropractor
0
50
100
150
200
250
187
3...
What does this really mean?
We can all assume things based on appearance, gender, ethnicity, age
etc.

GPs need to step b...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Māori health disparities

Māori have the greatest levels of health inequality in New Zealand, with measures of mortality and morbidity showing significant gaps compared to non-Māori even after controlling for deprivation.

  • Login to see the comments

  • Be the first to like this

Māori health disparities

  1. 1. Dr Peter Jansen FRNZCGP (Dist) FRACMA Senior Medical Advisor Māori Health Disparities
  2. 2. Introduction  Māori have the greatest levels of health inequality in New Zealand, with measures of mortality and morbidity showing significant gaps compared to non-Māori even after controlling for deprivation.  Research in New Zealand shows large disparities in access to care and outcome in stroke, primary care services, mental health, cardiac interventions, respiratory conditions, and cancer amongst others.
  3. 3. Māori Health  Māori spend a relatively greater proportion of their shorter lives disabled.  Higher burden of illness than non-Māori  Heart disease, Diabetes, Respiratory disease, Cancer, Other.  Burden associated with modifiable risk factors e.g. Smoking, Obesity.  Markers of deprivation e.g. low income, access to housing, employment & education.  Limited access to effective health services – culturally and clinically competent services and health practitioners.
  4. 4. GP Treatment A Study from New Zealand published in 2002 shows that while Māori can be diagnosed at the same rate as non-Māori in terms of depression, they are less likely to get effective treatment.  NZMJ 26 April, 2002, 115; No. 1152  253 consecutive patients in a university general practice (64 Maori) Comparison of 5 GPs diagnosis with that of independent interviewer, using BDI administered immediately after GP consult in separate room.  GPs identified ½ of patients with depression  No differences between Māori and non-Māori Māori are no more likely to be depressed than non-Māori, but were significantly much less likely to be prescribed antidepressants. 1 of 24 Māori vs. 24 of 53 non-Māori
  5. 5. Lower Access for Māori to ACC GP GP Rura Physio A & M Emergency Transport Hospital Chiropractor 0 50 100 150 200 250 187 39 22 17 11 6 5 224 39 41 27 11 7 10 Māori non-Māori
  6. 6. What does this really mean? We can all assume things based on appearance, gender, ethnicity, age etc.  GPs need to step back and think What does this person really need in terms of their healthcare? and then negotiate a good treatment plan with the person. We also see from other sources of data such as ACC, that Māori get less effective treatment. And that's shown in the average cost per claim. Apparently its cheaper to treat Māori, But that's just a throw away line. What that really means is that Māori get less volume of treatment for the same type of claim. Once again there's something going on in the mind of the treating Health Practitioner, that says this person needs more, this person needs less. Based on their ethnic background. There used to be only a few dozen Māori doctors, now we have over 400. And you're part of that same solution. All of you will go out and be really effective Health workers, Nurses, Pharmacists, a whole range of Health Professionals.

×