Stabilized Stream Crossing

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Stabilized Stream Crossing

  1. 1. The stabilized stream crossing has been sloped 5:1 and dug 10 inches below the level of the stream.
  2. 2. Sand is then hauled in.
  3. 3. The sand is shown here after it has been spread, 3 inches deep.
  4. 4. Geotextile fabric (8 mil) is next placed on the sand. We used rebar with washers welded on top to secure the fabric in place. The rebar is driven into the ground on all corners and on the upstream edge.
  5. 5. The geotextile fabric is shown here in place.
  6. 6. Next we put down four sheets of geocell. The geocell is 6 inches deep and comes in 8' x 20' honeycomb sheets. Notice that the corners are held in place by temporary rebar driven into the ground.
  7. 7. Rock is then hauled in and dumped onto the geocell. It fills the honeycomb structure and remains in place. Before the tractor drives over the recenty filled section of geocell, the rebar is removed to prevent puncturing the tires.
  8. 8. The gravel (10 inches) is now in place. Total cost for a 16-foot wide stream crossing point was $363. Cost-share assistance and technical information about how to construct stabilized stream crossings may be available through the local NRCS office.

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