Camera distances and angles

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  • Extreme long shot (XLS) – establishing shot, wide view of a location.
  • Extreme long shot (XLS) – person not recognizable (except from context)
  • Long shot (LS) – full body and some of the surroundins.
  • Medium long shot (MLS) – from the knees up, often used for two characters in conversation.
  • Medium shot (MS) – waist up, proximity without intimacy.
  • Medium close-up (MCU)
  • Close up (CU)
  • Close-up (CU)
  • Close-up (CU)
  • Extreme close-up (XCU)
  • The camera remains at eye level, even thought the characters are seated.
  • Eye-level. Normal. Implies neutrality toward the subject.
  • Camera distances and angles

    1. 1. Camera DistancesCamera Distances and Anglesand Angles
    2. 2. Camera Distance
    3. 3. The human body is the measure of subject- camera distance. What matters: The expressive results of (apparent) camera distance on screen.
    4. 4. Extreme Long Shot (environment dominates)
    5. 5. Extreme Long Shot
    6. 6. Long Shot (figure can be seen in context)
    7. 7. Long shot
    8. 8. Medium Long Shot (knees to head)
    9. 9. Medium long shot / Three shot
    10. 10. Medium Shot (waist to head)
    11. 11. Medium shot / Two shot
    12. 12. Medium shot / Single
    13. 13. Medium Close-up (shoulders and head)
    14. 14. Medium close-up
    15. 15. Close-up
    16. 16. Close-up
    17. 17. Extreme Close-up (isolates a small detail)
    18. 18. 18 Camera Angle and Height
    19. 19. The Great Train Robbery, 1903 Eye-level shot = normal
    20. 20. Sherlock Jr., 1924
    21. 21. Sherlock Jr., 1924 The camera angle remains at eye-level when the characters are sitting.
    22. 22. The Shawshank Redemption, 1994 Angled shots = abnormal way of seeing?
    23. 23. Viewers identify with the point of view of the camera.
    24. 24. Force of Evil, 1948
    25. 25. Eye Level
    26. 26. A camera placed at a low angle forces us to look up at the subject.
    27. 27. Low-Angle
    28. 28. Low-Angle
    29. 29. A high angle forces us to look down at the subject.
    30. 30. High-Angle
    31. 31. A Dutch tilt or canted angle presents the world off- balance.
    32. 32. Aerial View / Bird’s-Eye View
    33. 33. Aerial View / Bird’s-Eye View
    34. 34. Low camera height / normal angle
    35. 35. 37 FRAMING AND POINT OF VIEW

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