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Bonnie and Clyde Reviews<br />
Time<br />Producer Beatty and Director Arthur Penn have elected to tell their tale of bullets and blood in a strange and p...
Newsweek<br />A squalid shoot-em-up for the moron trade<br />
New York Times<br />It is a cheap piece of bald-faced slapstick comedy that treats the hideous depredations of that sleazy...
Chicago Sun Times (Roger Ebert)<br />This is pretty clearly the best American film of the year. It is also a landmark. Yea...
New Yorker (Pauline Kael)<br />Bonnie and Clyde” is the most excitingly American American movie since “The Manchurian Cand...
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Bonnie and clyde reviews

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Bonnie and clyde reviews

  1. 1. Bonnie and Clyde Reviews<br />
  2. 2. Time<br />Producer Beatty and Director Arthur Penn have elected to tell their tale of bullets and blood in a strange and purposeless mingling of fact and claptrap that teeters uneasily on the brink of burlesque. Like Bonnie and Clyde themselves, the film rides off in all directions and ends up full of holes. . . . The real fault with Bonnie and Clyde is its sheer, tasteless aimlessness.<br />
  3. 3. Newsweek<br />A squalid shoot-em-up for the moron trade<br />
  4. 4. New York Times<br />It is a cheap piece of bald-faced slapstick comedy that treats the hideous depredations of that sleazy, moronic pair as though they were as full of fun and frolic as the jazz-age cutups in Thoroughly Modern Millie. . . . [the film is] reddened with blotches of violence of the most grisly sort. . . . This blending of farce with brutal killings is as pointless as it is lacking in taste, since it makes no valid commentary upon the already travestied truth. And it leaves an astonished critic wondering just what purpose Mr. Penn and Mr. Beatty think they serve with this strangely antique, sentimental claptrap . . . <br />
  5. 5. Chicago Sun Times (Roger Ebert)<br />This is pretty clearly the best American film of the year. It is also a landmark. Years from now it is quite possible that "Bonnie and Clyde" will be seen as the definitive film of the 1960s, showing with sadness, humor and unforgiving detail what one society had come to. The fact that the story is set 35 years ago doesn't mean a thing. It had to be set sometime. But it was made now and it's about us. <br />
  6. 6. New Yorker (Pauline Kael)<br />Bonnie and Clyde” is the most excitingly American American movie since “The Manchurian Candidate.” The audience is alive to it. Our experience as we watch it has some connection with the way we reacted to movies in childhood: with how we came to love them and to feel they were ours—not an art that we learned over the years to appreciate but simply and immediately ours. When an American movie is contemporary in feeling, like this one, it makes a different kind of contact with an American audience from the kind that is made by European films, however contemporary. Yet any movie that is contemporary in feeling is likely to go further than other movies—go too far for some tastes—and “Bonnie and Clyde” divides audiences, as “The Manchurian Candidate” did, and it is being jumped on almost as hard. Though we may dismiss the attacks with “What good movie doesn’t give some offense?,” the fact that it is generally only good movies that provoke attacks by many people suggests that the innocuousness of most of our movies is accepted with such complacence that when an American movie reaches people, when it makes them react, some of them think there must be something the matter with it—perhaps a law should be passed against it.<br />

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