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What is it?
Some caveats
What we know
What we think
What we don’t know
• Studied by lot of different disciplines
• Used to mean different things
• A lot of different and related literatures
......
• Audience-specific
• Multidimensional
– Being known
– Being known for something
– Generalized favourability
• Benefit of the doubt/credibility
• More attractive for joint ventures
• Perceived as a less risky investment
• Greater m...
• Good reputations can also hurt:
– Targeting by activists
– Higher expectations
• Downsizing hurts reputation, even when ...
• Most work has been on “good” reputations
• Most work on Fortune’s Most Admired Companies
list
• A lot of work is theoret...
• Anticipatory impression management can help
• Two different types of reputations...
– Reputations may grow and decline i...
• Cross-level effects
• Bad reputations
• Unintended consequences
• Audience effects
• Cognitive and psychological effects...
• Industry, firm, executives
• Coherence across levels
Executives
Firm
Industry
• Lasting effects?
• Building versus repairing?
• Damaging or constraining nature of good
• Beneficial or enabling nature of bad
• Coherence vs. disagreement within
and across audiences
• Clusters?
• Power and politics
• Associations between cues and evaluations
• Cognitive evaluations vs. emotional reactions?
• When are reputations tightly coupled with reality?
• When are reputations very different from reality?
• What can be don...
An Academic Perspective on Reputation…, by Yuri Mishina, Assistant Professor of Organisational Behaviour/Strategy, Imperia...
An Academic Perspective on Reputation…, by Yuri Mishina, Assistant Professor of Organisational Behaviour/Strategy, Imperia...
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An Academic Perspective on Reputation…, by Yuri Mishina, Assistant Professor of Organisational Behaviour/Strategy, Imperial College London

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An Academic Perspective on Reputation…, by Yuri Mishina, Assistant Professor of Organisational Behaviour/Strategy, Imperial College London

  1. 1. What is it? Some caveats What we know What we think What we don’t know
  2. 2. • Studied by lot of different disciplines • Used to mean different things • A lot of different and related literatures ...so what is reputation?
  3. 3. • Audience-specific • Multidimensional – Being known – Being known for something – Generalized favourability
  4. 4. • Benefit of the doubt/credibility • More attractive for joint ventures • Perceived as a less risky investment • Greater market dominance • Higher accounting performance • Can protect you when bad things happen A good reputation can be useful...
  5. 5. • Good reputations can also hurt: – Targeting by activists – Higher expectations • Downsizing hurts reputation, even when analysts suggest it • People see and focus on different things • Rankings recreate rankings
  6. 6. • Most work has been on “good” reputations • Most work on Fortune’s Most Admired Companies list • A lot of work is theoretical
  7. 7. • Anticipatory impression management can help • Two different types of reputations... – Reputations may grow and decline in different ways – Different tactics might help for different types of reputations
  8. 8. • Cross-level effects • Bad reputations • Unintended consequences • Audience effects • Cognitive and psychological effects • Reputation versus reality
  9. 9. • Industry, firm, executives • Coherence across levels Executives Firm Industry
  10. 10. • Lasting effects? • Building versus repairing?
  11. 11. • Damaging or constraining nature of good • Beneficial or enabling nature of bad
  12. 12. • Coherence vs. disagreement within and across audiences • Clusters? • Power and politics
  13. 13. • Associations between cues and evaluations • Cognitive evaluations vs. emotional reactions?
  14. 14. • When are reputations tightly coupled with reality? • When are reputations very different from reality? • What can be done to decrease or increase this gap? • Does reputation matter in all situations? • How much do reputations matter? • How much should you spend to improve a reputation?

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