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All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement1© 2008 The Uptime Institut...
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Uptime Institute Fall 2008 EPO alternatives

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Uptime Institute Fall 2008 EPO alternatives

  1. 1. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement1© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.EPO Alternatives Project2008 AccomplishmentsSite Uptime® Network2008 Fall Conference
  2. 2. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement2© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project HistoryIn early 2007, a special project was initiatedby the Network to address the significant riskto uptime attributed to disconnecting meanscontrols, generally known as emergencypower off (EPO) switches.At each Network group’s spring 2007conference, an EPO Alternatives workingsession was held.
  3. 3. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement3© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Spring 2007 Working Sessions(Continued)Participants volunteered ideas for each oftwo approaches designed to minimize EPOdowntime:Best practices for working within existingcode requirementsRecommended changes to the codesThe cumulative list of ideas was recordedand reviewed last fall by the team ofindividual Network members whovolunteered to pursue the project’s ongoingobjectives.
  4. 4. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement4© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team MembersThese Network members participated on theproject team:Mike Bell of Office DepotDan Bonner of HPMatt Brown of HPJohn Clemens of HPMatt Gustafson of SSAJack Knavel of HSBCMike Lavazza of CiscoJerell Myers of Wachovia
  5. 5. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement5© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Members (Continued)Paul Peoples of TargetGregg Rudinski of Morgan StanleyLarry Rushing of HPJoe Stephenson of WachoviaWayne Whitcomb of BoeingDavid Boston of the InstituteRichard Schlosser of the Institute
  6. 6. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement6© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project ObjectivesDuring the fall 2007 conference, project teammembers identified four sub-teams thatwould work concurrently on the followingdeliverables:Task Team 1: Develop list of safetyenhancements that will result fromaccepting our proposed code changes.Task Team 2: Refine and complete list ofrecommended code changes.Task Team 3: Create best practices paperfor minimizing risks with installed EPOsystems.
  7. 7. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement7© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Objectives (Continued)Task Team 4: Create a primer for thosewho wish to construct a data center tocomply with the general requirements ofNFPA 70 (no EPO requirement).These teams worked on their objectivesindependently as the collective project teammet monthly thereafter.In the meantime, AFCOM representativesconfirmed they wished to join our projectteam. AFCOM had recently been developingtheir own plan to propose code changes.
  8. 8. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement8© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.AFCOM Project Team MembersThe following AFCOM individuals participated:Steve McCluer of APCTom Roberts of Trinity HealthRick Sawyer of EYPWilliam DiBella, AFCOM’s PresidentSteve was the only project team member withprevious code proposal writing experience.AFCOM team members met in person with theNetwork twice in January. Included was aworking session for the combined projectteam in Dallas.
  9. 9. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement9© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.AFCOMAFCOM was originally the acronym for theAssociation for Computer OperationsManagement. Now it’s simply AFCOM.AFCOM members are professionals relatedto data center management and operations,including data center managers, operationsmanagers, MIS directors, CIOs, CTOs andother IS/IT professionals.AFCOM members represent government,information services, insurance, healthcare,manufacturing and distribution, financialservices, universities, high-tech, consulting,telecommunications, utilities, and more.
  10. 10. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement10© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.AFCOM (Continued)AFCOM provides data center professionalswith networking opportunities andeducational forums and resources through itsannual Data Center World® conferences,published magazines, regional chapters, andindustry alliances.The AFCOM membership base representsmore than 4,000 of the world’s largest datacenters.
  11. 11. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement11© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Optimizing the Code ChangeProcessTask Team 2 sought a personal connectionon Code Making Panel 12 to advise us.After the 2007 fall Network conference, GregDolence of Progressive provided the projectteam with a contact from the NEC’s CodeMaking Panel 12: Lori Tennant fromSchneider Electric.This was the connection we needed.Lori was supportive and recommended wetalk with Joe Sheehan, the NFPA’s staffliaison for the NEC, to learn how to optimallywork within CMP-12’s process.
  12. 12. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement12© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Optimizing the Code ChangeProcess (Continued)We met in January 2008 with Joe Sheehan,who advised us to request a Task Groupfrom CMP-12 to provide feedback on ourideas. This would allow us to hear objectionsand find compromises before actuallysubmitting our proposal.Joe also advised that we inform localelectrical inspectors (often the AuthorityHaving Jurisdiction) of our intended codechange proposal by attending their regionalmeetings in the fall of 2008. (This approachhad helped another group’s proposal achieveacceptance.)
  13. 13. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement13© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Optimizing the Code ChangeProcess (Continued)Joe further assisted us with our desire for aTask Group by officially introducing us to TimCroushore, the CMP-12 chairperson.In late January, Tim Croushore reviewed adescription of our code change proposal andassigned Bob Johnson, a member of CMP-12, to head a Task Group to work with us.The Task Group initially included thefollowing CMP-12 members:An electrical utility representativeA UL representativeAn electrical inspector
  14. 14. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement14© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Optimizing the Code ChangeProcess (Continued)An electrical safety engineerAn electrical equipment manufacturer rep.A manufacturing company’s electrical eng.In addition:Two members of NFPA 75 (protection ofinformation technology equipment)Four members of NFPA 76 (fire protectionof telecommunications facilities)One NFPA staff memberSteve McCluer - representing AFCOMRichard Schlosser and David Boston -representing the Network
  15. 15. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement15© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team ProgressOver the winter and spring months, the fourTask Teams made continued progress.Task Team 1 was the first to complete theirwork. Mike Bell, Matt Gustafson, PaulPeoples, and Rick Sawyer provided a list ofsafety enhancements (for firefighters, datacenter occupants, and data processingcustomers) that would likely be achieved ifthe code change proposal is accepted. Thislist was passed on to Task Team 2 to includewith their code change proposal.
  16. 16. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement16© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)This list included:Emergency services respondunnecessarily (taken away from realemergencies) if disconnecting means areaccidentally deployedPeople on site are trained not to use it –may be a life safety issue in a realemergencyMany data centers directly threaten lifesafety if accidentally powered down (thosethat support VOIP, 911, medical, securitycompanies, etc.)
  17. 17. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement17© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Wayne Whitcomb was a one man “TaskTeam 3.” He developed the Best Practicesfor Minimizing Downtime Risks with InstalledEPO Systems paper that you have now as ahandout. Wayne utilized the informationcollected from spring 2007 Network workingsessions in combination with his ownexperience and ideas from the other ProjectTeam members.This document should be an immediatebenefit for the majority of members whooperate facilities with installed EPO systems.
  18. 18. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement18© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)This paper addresses various methods anddesigns that have been used to satisfy awide range of “Authorities Having Jurisdiction(AHJs)” in their interpretation of therequirements of NEC Article 645.10.In particular, it focuses on established “bestpractices,” with particular attention given tothe ones that provide the greatest protectionfrom accidental, inadvertent, or maliciousEPO activation (and are the most likely to beacceptable to most AHJ’s).
  19. 19. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement19© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)An optimal EPO design must include thefollowing elements:Tamper resistant switching device(s) locatedonly at each principal exit from the room.Switching devices that are installed at thesame location at each door and away fromother devices like light switches, fire alarmsand door opening devices.A highly audible alarmed cover mountedover the switch. (This is documented to bethe greatest deterrent to accidental andmalicious operation and can help to quicklyidentify which switch was activated.)
  20. 20. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement20© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)All conduits and j-boxes used for the EPOsystem wiring should be clearly marked todistinguish them from other systems.Clear and concise labels and proceduresposted at each switch location, in allapplicable languages.A normally open activation circuit requiringthe application of power to shut down theroom.A means of bypassing the system in order tomake modifications or to performmaintenance.
  21. 21. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement21© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Manual operation only, with nointerconnection to the smoke detectionsystem or other means of automaticactivation.A single source of power for tripping thecircuit breakers feeding the IT equipment inthe room.A simple and reliable design with gooddocumentation as well as an obviousconfiguration.Segregation into the smallest “zones” orquantity of affected IT equipment that isallowed by the code.
  22. 22. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement22© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)The ability to quickly identify which devicehas been activated so that the appropriateresponse can be given and the device canbe reset quickly.Cameras focused on each exit door,including the EPO switch.Training, including EPO specifics, for all whowork in the data center. This should beprovided the first day on site and at leastannually thereafter.Install switches that have a uniqueappearance instead of a button –type device.
  23. 23. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement23© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Disconnecting Means Device Cover
  24. 24. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement24© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Disconnecting Means Device
  25. 25. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement25© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Disconnecting MeansDevice With Cover
  26. 26. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement26© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)These methods have been approved by asmall number of AHJs and may be worthconsidering:A separate EPO system for each of twodual power paths, when dual power isprovided. Switches and covers may havedifferent colors for each power path.Install a single EPO in the main electricalroom or the Command Center instead ofat exit doors.
  27. 27. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement27© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)In summary, these guidelines should helpexisting data center owners with EPOsystems optimize EPO related uptime. Someof the steps listed may be implemented onlywhen upgrades to the facility are planned.
  28. 28. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement28© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Joe Stephenson, Matt Brown, Dan Bonner,John Clemens, Larry Rushing, and JerellMyers worked together to develop TaskTeam 4’s primer for Constructing a DataCenter Facility To Comply With the GeneralRequirements of NFPA 70.This is the second handout that you have.
  29. 29. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement29© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Data centers can be constructed to meetenterprise IT requirements withoutconforming to NFPA 70 Chapter 6, Article645, which requires DISCONNECTINGMEANS (commonly referred to as EPO orEmergency Power Off) controls.Only chapters 1 through 4 of the NEC aremandatory. Chapters 5, 6 and 7 apply tospecial occupancies, special equipment orother special conditions in which additionalrequirements are necessary or in whichexceptions can be made to the requirementsof the previous four chapters.
  30. 30. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement30© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Most data centers today are designed toconform to Chapter 645, which permitsadditional flexibility, cost savings, andconvenience when installing communicationsand power cabling, with the provision that adisconnecting means control be provided atprincipal exits.If the electrical system designer follows therequirements of chapters 1 through 4 only,the disconnecting means is not a requiredpart of the electrical distribution system, if thelocal Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ)concurs.
  31. 31. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement31© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)More than one Network member has electedto design and construct their data centerfacility to comply with the generalrequirements of NFPA 70 (chapters 1-4).The design team and owner should receive awritten commitment from the local AHJbefore proceeding with this type of datacenter design.
  32. 32. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement32© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Optional design choices to conform toChapters 1 through 4 (subject to localjurisdictions):Use non-raised floor design withoverhead power and IT cablingdistribution (low voltage overheadcabling) in the computer rooms.Or, install only wiring types permissiblebelow a raised floor used for air handling(Chapter 3), such as:Type MI cable (Article 332)
  33. 33. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement33© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Type MC cable without a covering(Article 330)Type AC cable without a nonmetallicsheath (Article 320)Other non-metallic cabling shall bepermitted to be installed in EMTconduit tubing. (Article 300)Other raceways without a nonmetallicsheath
  34. 34. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement34© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)If a raised floor is used, power andcommunication cabling under the floormust be enclosed, secured andprotected from physical damage.Article 300.22(c) (Articles320,330,332)Power receptacles, conduit, andflexible cables are secured inplace.
  35. 35. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement35© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Secure plenum rated power andcommunication cabling in solid bottommetal cable tray with solid metalcovers. Cables shall be secured incable trays in accordance with Article392.8.Enclosure and equipment ground mustbe in accordance with Article 250;cable trays in accordance with Article392.7
  36. 36. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement36© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Develop a corporate philosophy thatidentifies the cost of data center downtimeevents for the company and that prescribesthe need to invest the extra labor andmaterials necessary to meet one of the twooptional cabling applications defined in theprevious section.The additional cost will be minimal incomparison to the potential downtime costsavoided.
  37. 37. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement37© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Build data centers to conform to Chapters 1through 4 wherever AHJ’s support datacenter designs without “disconnectingmeans.”Life/safety design strategies that includeincipient and pre-action fire protectionsystems are preferred.Continuous shift Maintenance/Security,robust BAS monitoring, and comprehensivepersonnel training are preferred practices.
  38. 38. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement38© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Challenges to Success:Insurance requirements.Regional/city specific building codes.Cost/budget constraints.Education and agreement of AHJ.Code interpretations, reasonable andprudent alignment.
  39. 39. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement39© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)In summary, Article 645 is an option thatallows more lenient wiring rules in the ITequipment space as compared to the otherChapters of the NEC.A decision to design and build a data centersolely within the requirements of Chapters 1through 4 of the NEC (National ElectricalCode) should be made only after the costsand physical cabling limitations describedabove are carefully weighed vs. the potentialcosts of downtime related to an EPO event.
  40. 40. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement40© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Task Team 2 included Gregg Rudinski, JohnKnavel, Mike Lavazza, and Steve McCluer.This team significantly refined and added tothe list of code change proposal ideas thatthe Network originally developed in spring2007 working sessions.The team’s objective was to provide adocument that captures the concept for thechanges requested, as well as the details onhow the changes could be implemented.Steve McCluer then incorporated thisinformation in the first draft of the actualchange proposal.
  41. 41. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement41© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)All Task Teams have completed their originaldeliverables, but their members remain asparticipants on the overall Project Team.They will continue to provide input andfeedback to AFCOM/Network CMP-12Task Group members as the code changeproposal development progresses.As a next step, the EPO Alternatives ProjectTeam selected Steve McCluer, RichardSchlosser, and David Boston to representthem as members of the CMP-12 TaskGroup.
  42. 42. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement42© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)CMP-12’s Task Group met for the first timeon May 15th. At this point, only CMP-12members and AFCOM/Network memberswere included.CMP-12 asked us to share the history of theDisconnecting Means requirement, whichRichard Schlosser had previouslyresearched.We then presented a matrix and draftproposal forms which Steve McCluerauthored, based on input from Task Team 2.
  43. 43. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement43© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)CMP-12 members offered a number of ideasand suggested edits, most designed tosimplify the proposal and make it easier tounderstand and enforce for AHJs.They also asked for several definitions to beadded and for the substitution of preferredterminology in a few areas.The Task Group suggested that thechairperson invite NFPA members toparticipate now, instead of making themaware after CMP-12 reviewed the finalproposal, as they normally would.
  44. 44. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement44© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)NFPA 75 and NFPA 76 representativesagreed to participate as part of the TaskGroup.A second Task Group meeting was held July30th by conference call. The group nownumbered fifteen.The chairperson asked the group whatpurpose they felt the disconnecting meansrequirement served.The group was split between those whothought it no longer served a purpose andthose who did.
  45. 45. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement45© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)The Task Group will therefore not try toeliminate the requirement at this time.Much of the meeting’s discussion focusedon aligning definitions and wordingbetween Article 645, NFPA 75, and NFPA76. This was very tedious.Feedback on the AFCOM/Networkchange proposal was only received duringthe last hour of a five hour call. Most wasdetail oriented, rather than conceptual.
  46. 46. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement46© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Project Team Progress (Continued)Seven subsequent Task Group meetingswere held by conference call from Augustthrough October. Each lasted four hours.The process involved gaining consensus oneach line of Article 645 of the Code. CMP-12’s chairperson had dictated that the groupreview the entire article.Unfortunately, this is indicative of theexhaustive committee work required to effectchanges for codes (and other critical industryinitiatives like energy efficiency policy).
  47. 47. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement47© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Final ProposalThe Task Group’s final change proposal for645.10 reads as follows:An approved means shall be provided todisconnect power to all electronicequipment in the information technologyequipment room or in designated zoneswithin the room. There shall also be asimilar approved means to disconnect thepower to all dedicated HVAC systemsserving the room or designated zones andshall cause all required fire/smokedampers to close. Disconnecting meansshall be implemented by either (A) or (B)below.
  48. 48. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement48© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Final Proposal (Continued)(A) Remote Controls for DisconnectingMeans1. Remote Controls for DisconnectingMeans shall be at approved locationsreadily accessible in case of fire toauthorized personnel and emergencyresponders.2. The Remote Controls for DisconnectingMeans for the control of electronicequipment power and HVAC systemsshall be grouped and identified. A singlemeans to control both shall be permitted.
  49. 49. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement49© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Final Proposal (Continued)3. Where multiple zones are created, eachzone shall have an approved means toconfine fire or products of combustion towithin the zone.4. Additional means to prevent unintentionaloperations of remote disconnect controlsshall be permitted.FPN: For further information see NFPA 75-2008,Standard for the Protection of InformationTechnology Equipment.
  50. 50. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement50© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Final Proposal (Continued)(B) No Remote Controls for DisconnectingMeansRemote Controls for Disconnecting Meansshall not be required for critical operationsdata systems when all of the following aremet:1. An approved procedure has beenestablished and maintained for removingpower and air movement within the roomor zone.2. Qualified personnel are continuouslyavailable to meet emergency respondersand to advise them of disconnectingmethods.
  51. 51. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement51© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Final Proposal (Continued)3. A smoke sensing fire detection system isin place.FPN: For further information on early warning firedetection systems, see NFPA 72-2007,National Fire Alarm Code.4. An approved fire suppression systemsuitable for the application is in place.5. Cables under a raised floor other thanbranch circuit wiring and power cords arein compliance with 300.22(C),725.154(A), 770.154(A), or 800.154(A).(As required in Chapters 1-4.)
  52. 52. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement52© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.IAEI EducationSeparately, AFCOM and Network projectteam members have handed out a summaryof our proposal effort to electrical inspectorsat five regional IAEI conferences this fall.At each of these conferences, we workedfrom a desk or booth in the exhibit hall.We encouraged discussion and input fromthe inspectors (many of whom are AHJs)regarding our proposal effort.We believe this effort will help when theproposal review process occurs.
  53. 53. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement53© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Additional Assistance - ITICThe Information Technology Industry Council(ITIC) is made up of computer hardware andsoftware manufacturers.They are frequently involved in changeefforts with national organizations and codebodies.ITIC has indicated they will support oureffort. We recently sent them a copy of ourfinal proposal and asked that they helpwhere they can.They have at least two individuals withexperience participating on the code panels.
  54. 54. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement54© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Next StepsBecause we reached consensus on theproposal wording before the proposaldeadline, the CMP-12 Task Group hasadopted our proposal and recently submittedit themselves.This is considered a significant benefit, asit should carry a strong endorsement withthe rest of the proposal review group.As members of the Task Group, we will haveone AFCOM/Network representative presentat the Code Making Panel meetings (reviewof proposals) in January, 2009.
  55. 55. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement55© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Next Steps (Continued)From that point forward, we will monitor theproceedings and update Network membersas we learn of decisions or feedback on ourproposal.If we see opportunities to help by askingNetwork, AFCOM, and ITIC members toshare comments in support of theproposal, we will notify members of eachgroup.The projected schedule for the Code changeprocess follows:
  56. 56. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement56© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Projected Schedule – Code ChangesThis cycle for changes is the 2011 NEC.The closing date for public proposals forchanges to the 2011 NEC is November 7,2008.Code Making Panel meetings will concludeJanuary 24, 2009.NFPA’s Report on Proposals - July 14, 2009.NFPA’s closing date for receipt of comments– October 23, 2009.
  57. 57. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement57© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Projected Schedule (Continued)Code Making Panel meetings close (reviewof comments) – December 14, 2009.NFPA publishes Report on Comments –March 28, 2010.Intent to Make a Motion closing date –May 7, 2010.Association Meeting – June 5-9, 2010.Implementation of Changes Accepted –issued January 2011.Adopted into Law by Local Jurisdictions –months to years later.
  58. 58. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement58© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.Annual ReminderEach year, our AIR trending report shows thatseveral member sites still:Do not disable local PDU EPOs.Do not ensure the fire system has noconnection to the EPO.Do not provide audibly alarmed covers,labels and consistent training (to all who willenter the computer room) for EPO switches.Have you verified these conditions do not existat your facility?
  59. 59. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement59© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.In ClosingIf successful, it will be 2011 or later before ourproposed Code changes are effective. Thebenefits will be substantial for the industry.The immediate benefits for our members arethe two documents you received today.You may implement Best Practices forMinimizing Downtime Risks with InstalledEPO Systems as soon as you identify a plan.You may choose to build future data centersthat do not require Disconnecting Means, asdescribed in Constructing a Data CenterFacility To Comply With the GeneralRequirements of NFPA 70.
  60. 60. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement60© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.In Closing (Continued)Please join me in thanking all our ProjectTeam members, who have contributed manyhours in addition to their “real” jobs:Mike Bell of Office DepotDan Bonner of HPMatt Brown of HPJohn Clemens of HPMatt Gustafson of SSAJack Knavel of HSBCMike Lavazza of CiscoSteve McCluer of APC
  61. 61. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement61© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.In Closing (Continued)Jerell Myers of WachoviaPaul Peoples of TargetTom Roberts of Trinity HealthGregg Rudinski of Morgan StanleyRick Sawyer of EYPRichard Schlosser of the InstituteJoe Stephenson of WachoviaWayne Whitcomb of BoeingIt has been a particular pleasure to team withmembers of AFCOM for the first time.
  62. 62. All Information in This Report is Confidential and Covered by an Information Exchange Agreement62© 2008 The Uptime Institute, Inc.In Closing (Continued)Questions?

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