DRA Em101

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Red Cross Disaster Academy Emergency Management 101

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  • Culture and Sr. Executive support
    Communication- an executive listens, talks, and processes information differently than a front line employee. L
    Language of task vs. language of people.
    Remember- it is a process, not a project.- bothers me the most about what I do
  • Play the field! Don’t focus
  • DRA Em101

    1. 1. Emergency Management 101 Matt Ankley Emergency Preparedness Program Manager, Disneyland Resort American Red Cross of Orange County Disaster Preparedness Academy 1
    2. 2. 2 Overview • Today’s Emergency Manager • Why Plan? • The cooking approach to Emergency Management – Prep Work – Ingredients / Recipe – Putting it all together • FREE Resources
    3. 3. 3 Our Group • Non profits • Small businesses • Large businesses • Government • Many of us start the same way..
    4. 4. 4 • It is likely you: – Were handed the responsibility ….. – Don’t have an abundance of time, money, people, etc…. – Want to do a good job with this responsibility... – Are struggling with finding resources
    5. 5. 5
    6. 6. 6 Reasons Why to Plan • “XX% of businesses that fail to plan/prepare cease to be viable after disasters” • Strong organizational support can be an employee retention factor • Strong organizational support can be a factor in awarding contracts for business • Failure to plan can negatively impact your image
    7. 7. 7 Reasons Why to Plan • People assume things will return to normal soon It’s the right thing to do
    8. 8. 8 Emergency Management Planning Excuses • “the (insert responding agency) will take care of me” • “I’ll figure it out on the fly” • “We don’t have enough (insert resource here)” • “It’s too complicated” • “people at work don’t care…” • “I don’t have help”
    9. 9. 9 The Good News…. • Be prepared for people to resist you (this is a positive thing, really!) • Help- its out there! • Plagiarize! • Your local Emergency Manager wants your help • Marathon Runner vs. Sprinter • Your employees and clients want you to succeed
    10. 10. The Cooking Analogy…. 10
    11. 11. 11
    12. 12. THE PREP WORK 12
    13. 13. 13 Where to begin? • Learn ICS, SEMS, and NIMS – Incident Command System – Standardized Emergency Management System – National Incident Management System • Understand what are your Goals? – Life Safety – Protect the business / property / financial interests
    14. 14. NIMS Incident Management Incident Command System Multi-Agency Coordination System (MACS) Unified Command (UC) Public Information System The management system used to direct all operations at the incident scene. The IC is located at an Incident Command Post (ICP) at the incident scene. An activity or a formal system used to coordinate resources and support between agencies or Jurisdictions. MACs are useful for regional situations. (MAC Groups are normally composed of Agency Executives) UC provides guidelines to enable agencies with different legal, geographic, and functional responsibilities to coordinate, plan, and interact effectively. Public Information Systems will establish protocols for communicating timely and accurate information to the public during a crisis or emergency situation. 14
    15. 15. 15 Field Response • Teams of responders and their command structure responsible for the “hands on, boots on the ground” actions
    16. 16. 16 Emergency Operation Centers • Teams and their command structures that are responsible for: – Providing assets to the field – Creating overall situational awareness – Attempt to develop strategies to get ahead of the incident – Provide high level policy decisions – Track financial aspects – May implement / guide Business Continuity
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    19. 19. THE INGREDIENTS / RECIPE 19
    20. 20. 20 The Emergency Management Life Cycle • Mitigation- to reduce, lessen, or decrease • Preparedness- the state of having been made ready for action • Response- provision of assistance or intervention during or immediately after a disaster • Recovery- get back to the original state Mitigation Preparedness Recovery Response
    21. 21. 21 Mitigation Response Preparedness Recovery •Planning / Plan Writing •Training •Drills and Exercises •Evaluation
    22. 22. 22 Where to begin? • Hazard Assessments – Look beyond your physical layout – Rank frequency vs. severity – Consider • Man Made Hazards- hazardous materials, transportation corridors, airports, possible terrorism targets, utility supply routes, etc. • Natural Hazards- storms, flooding, extreme heat, earthquakes, etc. – Use this matrix to develop your priorities Mitigation
    23. 23. 23
    24. 24. 24 You are Here
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    34. 34. Natural Hazard Matrix Hazard Severity Frequency Weighting Priority Earthquake 5 4 9 2 Severe Storms (wind/rain) 3 3 6 4 Tornado 3 1 4 5 Man-Made Hazard Matrix Hazard Severity Frequency Weighting Priority Railway Issue (HAZMAT) 2 2 4 6 Building Fire 5 4 9 1 Active Shooter 5 2 7 3 Anytown Industries Hazard Matrix Mitigation 34
    35. 35. 35 Where to begin? • Once you understand your hazards, try to mitigate their impacts on your operation – Seismic equipment, better drainage, improved fire sprinkler systems, building security systems, etc. – Utility / IT redundancies – Back up equipment • Rarely can you mitigate away the hazards Mitigation
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    37. 37. 37 • Strong preparedness efforts benefit your organization by: – Ultimately saving lives and reduce property damage – Streamline your response phase and make it less chaotic – Improve your chances of a successful recovery and return to business Preparedness
    38. 38. 38 • Preparedness efforts take the most time as they are divided into the following areas: – Planning and plan writing – Training / equipping – Drills and exercises – Evaluation Preparedness
    39. 39. 39 Plan Writing • Plans are a written reference on how you will respond, under certain circumstances – Overarching Emergency Management Plan – Supporting “incident specific” annexes – Goal specific • Solicit help from your departments to create buy in and ownership • Avoid specific names / contact numbers Use positions and titles instead Preparedness
    40. 40. 40 Preparedness
    41. 41. 41 Preparedness
    42. 42. 42 Training • Classroom / Computer Based Training • Instill the knowledge first, and ensure competency in the knowledge base • Seek out gaps, and fill those gaps • Make sure your training addresses the scope of limitations of your response Preparedness
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    45. 45. 45 Drills and Exercises • “the plan looked good on paper!?!?!” – Discussions – Table tops (directed or pressured) – Drills – Exercises • Create an environment of trust – Learning is key – No fault situations – “test the plans and the procedures, not the people” Preparedness
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    47. 47. Drill and Exercise Examples • Building fire evacuation / earthquake drills • Location medical response drills • Equipment deployment drills • Interagency coordination drills • Business Continuity • Sweat the small stuff! 47 Preparedness
    48. 48. 48 Drills and Exercises • Don’t conduct a drill or exercise “just because” – Must be objective driven (SMART Objectives) – Take the all hazards approach – Exercise all aspects of your response and recovery – Consider all aspects of the incident, try to uncover what has not been addressed or is unclear Preparedness
    49. 49. 49 Evaluation • Evaluate everything! – Formal vs. informal evaluation • Honesty in evaluation • Lessons learned and improvements should be incorporated into the written plan revision • When able, seek external evaluation for an objective, impartial vantage point Preparedness
    50. 50. 50 Response • Something bad has happened- time to enact your plan – Don’t expect a textbook response • Attempt to get ahead of the incident • You set the pace of the response • Remember- objectives based response Response Response “EGBOK”
    51. 51. 51 Recovery Phase or Business Continuity • Also requires time and effort up front • Think “normal business operations triage” • Your organization may be ready to function, but the community may still be having difficulty Recovery
    52. 52. PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER 52
    53. 53. 53 Keys to Success • Senior Executive support through to the front line employee • Build a culture • Financial- what do you want to do/be after the disaster? • Learn to communicate on different levels UNDER CONSTRUCTION……. !
    54. 54. “Aside from safety, the number one thing to manage in an incident is communication.” 54
    55. 55. 55 Where to Go Wrong • Surprise drills / no notice drills • Weak / no management support • Accept sole responsibility for your organization’s EMP • Rely on the written plan • The “Island Effect” • Have your EMP become a static process
    56. 56. 56 Resources • American Red Cross -oc-redcross.org • Ready OC -readyoc.org • Ready.gov -ready.gov/business • FEMA Emergency Management Institute –training.fema.gov • California Emergency Management Agency (Cal EMA) -oes.ca.gov • Business and Industry Council on Emergency Planning and Preparedness – BICEPP.org
    57. 57. 57 Thank You! • http://linkedin.com/in/MattAnkley – Presentation download – Contact information

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