Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Leadership implications of the web

1,764 views

Published on

January 2011 mbodlg.org program

  • Be the first to comment

Leadership implications of the web

  1. 1. The Leadership Implications of theEvolving WebGrady McGonagill, Ed.D.AMcGonagill Consulting Massachusetts Bay Organization Development Learning GroupJanuary 19, 2011
  2. 2. Leadership Implications of the Evolving Web Study  Context: - Bertelsmann Stiftung Leadership Series  Motivation: - Document innovative examples of Web 2.0 tool applications  Methology: - Review of books/articles, Web - Expert interviews  Focus: - Individual sectors (business, government, social) - InternationalMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 2
  3. 3. “Aha - Moments”  The Web is bringing about a revolution with few precedents  Its impact is in the form of new mindsets and culture more than new tools  Implications for leadership: a new paradigm  Implications for organizing: a new sector—a 21st Century Virtual Commons  Most intriguing new concept: “emergence”Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 3
  4. 4. Need for New Leadership Paradigm: 7 Indicators Leadership as an activity rather than a role Recognition of leadership as a collective process From organization-centric to network-centric leadership From organizations as “machines“ to organizations as “organisms“ From planning and controlling to learning and adaptation Need for new levels of leadership capacity From Generation X to Generation YMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 4
  5. 5. Need for New Leadership Paradigm: 7 Indicators Leadership as an activity rather than a role Recognition of leadership as a collective process From organization-centric to network-centric leadership From organizations as “machines“ to organizations as “organisms“ From planning and controlling to learning and adaptation Need for new levels of leadership capacity From Generation X to Generation YMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 5
  6. 6. Need for New Leadership Paradigm: 7 Indicators Leadership as an activity rather than a role Recognition of leadership as a collective process From organization-centric to network-centric leadership From organizations as “machines“ to organizations as “organisms“ From planning and controlling to learning and adaptation Need for new levels of leadership capacity From Generation X to Generation YMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 6
  7. 7. Need for New Leadership Paradigm: 7 Indicators Leadership as an activity rather than a role Recognition of leadership as a collective process Need for new levels of leadership capacity From organization-centric to network-centric leadership From organizations as “machines“ to organizations as “organisms“ From planning and controlling to learning and adaptation From Generation X to Generation YMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 7
  8. 8. Need for New Leadership Paradigm: 7 Indicators Leadership as an activity rather than a role Recognition of leadership as a collective process Need for new levels of leadership capacity From organization-centric to network-centric leadership From organizations as machines to organizations as organisms From planning and controlling to learning and adaptation From Generation X to Generation YMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 8
  9. 9. Need for New Leadership Paradigm: 7 Indicators Leadership as an activity rather than a role Recognition of leadership as a collective process Need for new levels of leadership capacity From organization-centric to network-centric leadership From organizations as machines to organizations as organisms From planning and controlling to learning and adaptation From Generation X to Generation YMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 9
  10. 10. Need for New Leadership Paradigm: 7 Indicators Leadership as an activity rather than a role Recognition of leadership as a collective process Need for new levels of leadership capacity From organization-centric to network-centric leadership From organizations as machines to organizations as organisms From planning and control to sensing, adaptating, and learning From Generation X to Generation YMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 10
  11. 11. Need for New Leadership Paradigm: 7 Indicators Leadership as an activity rather than a role Recognition of leadership as a collective process Need for new levels of leadership capacity From organization-centric to network-centric leadership From organizations as “machines“ to organizations as “organisms“ From planning and controlling to learning and adaptation From Generation X to Generation YMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 11
  12. 12. Criteria for a New Paradigm  Adaptive  Supportive of emergence  Cognizant of complexity  Integral  Outcome-orientedMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 12
  13. 13. New Paradigms: 5 Examples  Action Inquiry  Adaptive Leadership  CCL’s DAC model  Integral Leadership  Theory U Page 13Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill
  14. 14. Developing New Mindsets, Skills, Knowledge, Cultures  Mindsets: from the need to control to the “art of letting go”  Skills: - Old: interpersonal skills, coaching, team/group facilitation, systems thinking - New: network leadership, leading “Millennials“  Knowledge: Web 2.0 literacy, cultural literacy  Culture: “Fehlerkultur “ Page 14Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 14
  15. 15. Developing New Mindsets, Skills, Knowledge, Cultures  Mindsets: from the need to control to the “art of letting go”  Skills: - Old: interpersonal skills, coaching, team/group facilitation, systems thinking - New: network leadership, leading “Millennials“  Knowledge: Web 2.0 literacy, cultural literacy  Culture: “Fehlerkultur ” Page 15Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 15
  16. 16. Developing New Mindsets, Skills, Knowledge, Cultures  Mindsets: from the need to control to the “art of letting go”  Skills: - Old: interpersonal skills, coaching, team/group facilitation, systems thinking - New: network leadership, leading “Millennials“  Knowledge: Web 2.0 literacy, cultural literacy  Culture: “Fehlerkultur ” Page 16Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 16
  17. 17. New Leadership Approaches: Developing New Mindsets, Skills, Knowledge, Cultures Mindsets: from the need to control to the “art of letting go“ Skills: - Old: interpersonal skills, coaching, team/group facilitation, systems thinking - New: network leadership, leading “Millennials“ Knowledge: Web 2.0 literacy, cultural literacy Culture: “Fehlerkultur ” Page 17Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 17
  18. 18. New Leadership Approaches: Developing New Mindsets, Skills, Knowledge, Culture  Mindsets: from the need to control to the “art of letting go“  Skills: - Old: interpersonal skills, coaching, team/group facilitation, systems thinking - New: network leadership, leading “Millennials“  Knowledge: Web 2.0 literacy, cultural literacy  Culture: “Fehlerkultur ” Page 18Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 18
  19. 19. The (Organizational) Impact of the Web by Sector 1. Business Sector 2. Social Sector 3. Government Sector 4. A 21st Century “Commons“ Page 19Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 19
  20. 20. The (Organizational) Impact of the Web by Sector 1. Business Sector 2. Social Sector 3. Government Sector 4. A 21st Century “Commons“ Page 20Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 20
  21. 21. The (Organizational) Impact of the Web by Sector 1. Business Sector 2. Social Sector 3. Government Sector 4. A 21st Century “Commons“ Page 21Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 21
  22. 22. The (Organizational) Impact of the Web by Sector 1. Business Sector 2. Social Sector 3. Government Sector 4. A 21st Century “Commons“ Page 22Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 22
  23. 23. Business Sector  Challenges and Opportunities  Examples and Patterns  Cases Page 23Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 23
  24. 24. Challenges and Opportunities  “Enterprise 2.0”: The “Open, Networked Enterprise,” reflecting changes in… - Corporate boundaries (from closed, vertically integrated to open, networked) - Innovation (from closed, within company to open, including co-creation with customers and drawing ideas from a global brain trust) - Marketing (from one-way “push” strategies to two-way conversations) - IT capacity (from company-based to the resource pool of the Cloud) - Intellectual property (from proprietary and protected to open and shared) - Knowledge (from “stocks,” such as books and libraries, to “flows,” such as conversations in which contextually relevant information and tacit knowledge are exchanged) Page 24Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 24
  25. 25. Challenges and Opportunities  New Ecosystems of Competition and Cooperation, in which… - Enterprises offer customers not just a product or service, but a platform capability upon which they can build their own value propositions - Relationships are a two-way street - Companies mimic the biological example of “keystone species” that proactively maintain the health of the entire ecosystem - Networks of businesses now compete with one another - Customers act as “Prosumers” (Producers and Consumers) - Companies operate “on the edge of chaos” Page 25Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 25
  26. 26. Challenges and Opportunities  New Ecosystems of Competition and Cooperation, in which… - Companies offer customers not just a product or service, but a platform capability upon which they can build their own value propositions - Relationships are a two-way street - Companies mimic the biological example of “keystone species” that proactively maintain the health of the entire ecosystem - Networks of businesses now compete with one another - Customers act as “Prosumers” (Producers and Consumers) - Companies operate “on the edge of chaos” Page 26Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 26
  27. 27. Challenges and Opportunities  New Ecosystems of Competition and Cooperation, in which… - Companies offer customers not just a product or service, but a platform capability upon which they can build their own value propositions - Relationships are a two-way street - Companies mimic the biological example of “keystone species” that proactively maintains the health of the entire ecosystem - Networks of businesses now compete with one another - Customers act as “Prosumers” (Producers and Consumers) - Companies operate “on the edge of chaos” Page 27Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 27
  28. 28. Challenges and Opportunities  The “New Industrial Revolution”… - Enables entrepreneurs to compete with established businesses by combining technological innovations with Web-enabled virtual networks - Brings good news for entrepreneurs, consumers, society - Brings bad news for established companies threatened with new, lean competitors Page 28Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 28
  29. 29. Patterns and Examples  Communication between employees and management  Communication among employees  Efficiencies within companies  Relationships between companies and talent outside the company  Relationships between companies and customers  Relationships between companies and suppliers  Relationships among companies  Ecosystems of partners, suppliers and customers Page 29Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 29
  30. 30. Patterns and Examples  Communication between employees and management  Communication among employees  Efficiencies within companies  Relationships between companies and talent outside the company  Relationships between companies and customers  Relationships between companies and suppliers  Relationships among companies  Ecosystems of partners, suppliers and customers Page 30Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 30
  31. 31. Patterns and Examples  Communication between employees and management  Communication among employees  Efficiencies within companies  Relationships between companies and talent outside the company  Relationships between companies and customers  Relationships between companies and suppliers  Relationships among companies  Ecosystems of partners, suppliers and customers Page 31Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 31
  32. 32. Patterns and Examples  Communication between employees and management  Communication among employees  Efficiencies within companies  Relationships between companies and talent outside the company  Relationships between companies and customers  Relationships between companies and suppliers  Relationships among companies  Ecosystems of partners, suppliers and customers Page 32Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 32
  33. 33. Patterns and Examples  Communication between employees and management  Communication among employees  Efficiencies within companies  Relationships between companies and talent outside the company  Relationships between companies and customers  Relationships between companies and suppliers  Relationships among companies  Ecosystems of partners, suppliers and customers Page 33Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 33
  34. 34. Patterns and Examples  Communication between employees and management  Communication among employees  Efficiencies within companies  Relationships between companies and talent outside the company  Relationships between companies and customers  Relationships between companies and suppliers  Relationships among companies  Ecosystems of partners, suppliers and customers Page 34Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 34
  35. 35. Patterns and Examples  Communication between employees and management  Communication among employees  Efficiencies within companies  Relationships between companies and talent outside the company  Relationships between companies and customers  Relationships between companies and suppliers  Relationships among companies  Ecosystems of partners, suppliers and customers Page 37Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 37
  36. 36. Cases ─ Cisco ─ SAP ─ Core Media Page 38Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 38
  37. 37. Cisco  Web-enabled platform ,supporting a “collaborative channel” of communication within an ecosystem of stakeholders (employees, customers, competitors)  Web tools for faster, cheaper, greener meetings  Changes in organizational structure to distribute decision-making, innovate faster, bring products to market sooner Page 39Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 39
  38. 38. SAP  From small company in Walldorf, Germany to 4th largest software company in the world, in 25 years  Creates company-wide software applications  Had to cope with wrenching industry change: moving from large, tightlyintegrated application software to more looselycoupled modules  Introduced Netweaver in 2003 to integrate existing enterprise applications  Dilemma: how to encourage adoption of a radically new, complex product  Solution: SAP Development Network (SDN) Page 40Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 40
  39. 39. Core Media  Hamburg-based supplier of content-management software  Dilemma: “How to stay in control when the market, the technologies in use, global competition, and society itself is changing at an ever- increasing rate?”  Solution: “Let go” of traditional approach to management and embrace the social-networking culture of Enterprise 2.0  Online platform featuring many forms of social media, to enable exchange among staff, customers, partners  Traditional hierarchy replaced by a flexible, highly networked structure  Fostered a culture valuing transparency, openness, non-hierarchical, team-based organizing, upward feedback and criticism  Employed “open-space” facilitation tools to couple individual passion with company needs and opportunitiesMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 42
  40. 40. Exploring the Implications for Leadership in Organizations  Determining how your organization should position itself  Encouraging your organization to respond strategically 1. Gain personal Web literacy and foster it on your team 2. Encourage a long-term thinking process that addresses Web strategies 3. Encourage your organization to develop policies on use of social media 4. Encourage someone in the C-Suite of your organization to initiate a blog 5. Help your organization anticipate/address barriers to open leadership and use of Web tools 6. Encourage your human relations, marketing and communications departments to experiment with social media 7. Discourage ownership of Web strategies by your IT departmentMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 44
  41. 41. Exploring the Implications for Leadership in Organizations  Determining how your organization should position itself  Encouraging your organization to respond strategically 1. Gain personal Web literacy and foster it on your team 2. Encourage a long-term thinking process that addresses Web strategies 3. Encourage your organization to develop policies on use of social media 4. Encourage someone in the C-Suite of your organization to initiate a blog 5. Help your organization anticipate/address barriers to open leadership and use of Web tools 6. Encourage your human relations, marketing and communications departments to experiment with social media 7. Discourage ownership of Web strategies by your IT departmentMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Seite 45
  42. 42. Exploring the Implications for Leadership in Organizations  Determining how your organization should position itself  Encouraging your organization to respond strategically 1. Gain personal Web literacy and foster it on your team 2. Encourage a long-term thinking process that addresses Web strategies 3. Encourage your organization to develop policies on use of social media 4. Encourage someone in the C-Suite of your organization to initiate a blog 5. Help your organization anticipate/address barriers to open leadership and use of Web tools 6. Encourage your human relations, marketing and communications departments to experiment with social media 7. Discourage ownership of Web strategies by your IT departmentMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Page 46
  43. 43. Exploring the Implications for Leadership in Organizations  Determining how your organization should position itself  Encouraging your organization to respond strategically 1. Gain personal Web literacy and foster it on your team 2. Encourage a long-term thinking process that addresses Web strategies 3. Encourage your organization to develop policies on use of social media 4. Encourage someone in the C-Suite of your organization to initiate a blog 5. Help your organization anticipate/address barriers to open leadership and use of Web tools 6. Encourage your human relations, marketing and communications departments to experiment with social media 7. Discourage ownership of Web strategies by your IT departmentMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Page 47
  44. 44. Exploring the Implications for Leadership in Organizations  Determining how your organization should position itself  Encouraging your organization to respond strategically 1. Gain personal Web literacy and foster it on your team 2. Encourage a long-term thinking process that addresses Web strategies 3. Encourage your organization to develop policies on use of social media 4. Encourage someone in the C-Suite of your organization to initiate a blog 5. Help your organization anticipate/address barriers to open leadership and use of Web tools 6. Encourage your human relations, marketing and communications departments to experiment with social media 7. Discourage ownership of Web strategies by your IT departmentMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Page 48
  45. 45. Appendix We offer a comprehensive and detailed overview of Web tools in the context of its brief history - Web 1.0 - Web 2.0 - Web 3.0 etc.Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Page 49
  46. 46. Is the Glass half-full or half-empty? The ultimate impact of the Web is not knowable There are clearly a variety of risks and threats We side with the optimistsMassachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill Page 50
  47. 47. “A door like this has cracked open five or six times since we got upon our hind legs. It’s the best possible time to be alive, when almosteverything you thought you knew is wrong.” r 2010 Spoken by the character Valentine Coverly in Tom Stoppard’s play Arcadia. Page 51
  48. 48. QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION• What is your personal experience of how client organizations are changing as a result of the Web and how leaders are responding?• What do you2010 as the implications for consultants and r see coaches who work with leaders as they confront these changes?• What challenges/dilemmas do you personally face as an OD practitioner as a result of the impact of the Web? Page 52
  49. 49. Evaluation What I got/learned What I most enjoyed What could have been better Value to me (scale of 1-5) Further comments Page 53Massachusetts Bay Learning Group January 19, 2011 Grady McGonagill

×