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Press Vulnerability
 the existence of a robust and rambunctious
press
 no government control of publishing and no
offici...
SOURCE: BUSINESSWORLD TOP 1000
CORPORATIONS
Mouthpiece of Owners
*In October 1995, the Emilio Yap’s Manila
Bulletin, the country’s second largest
newspaper, ran daily...
Mouthpieces of Owners
 In August and September 1996, the
Manila Standard owned by Razon's
family ran editorials and news ...
Proprietorial meddling
 Proprietorial meddling is open-ended
and outcomes can vary
 Some newsrooms are like marketplaces...
Proprietorial meddling
 At some situation in Manila Standard, they leave
their editors to decide on what the paper can
pr...
Proprietorial meddling
 In the Philippine daily Inquirer, some editors
manage to strike out a relationship where
owners h...
Philippine Daily Inquirer
Proprietorial meddling
 The Inquirer, which started out as a
fighting, journalist-owned opposition
paper, operates on suc...
Foundations of modern day
newspapering
 in the beginning of the 20th century,
foundations of modern-day newspapering in
t...
Foundations of modern day
newspapering
 By the 1920s, newspapering was becoming a
profitable business, with the expansion...
Development of Philippine Press
 Alejandro Roces –Spanish Mestizo who
founded a chain of newspapers and the
pioneer of th...
Foundations of modern day
newspapering
 In the 1930s, the wealthy Elizalde family
acquired other newspapers to form the
E...
Foundations of modern day
newspapering
 In 1947, Eugenio Lopez Sr., bought The
Manila Chronicle to help boost his
efforts...
Foundations of modern day
newspapering
 Luis R. Mauricio -a Veteran journalist
during the Quirino administration and
the ...
Lords of the press (Media Situations)
Lords of the press (Media Situations)
Lords of the press (Media Situations)
Lords of the press (Media Situations)
Lords of the press (Media Situations)
Lords of the press (Media Situations)
Lords of the press (Media Situations)
Lords of the press (Media Situations)
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Lords of the press (Media Situations)

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Philippine Press

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Lords of the press (Media Situations)

  1. 1. Press Vulnerability  the existence of a robust and rambunctious press  no government control of publishing and no official censorship exists  restrained only by laws on libel and sedition  Constitutional guarantee of a free press  utilized by their owners to wage political and business battles
  2. 2. SOURCE: BUSINESSWORLD TOP 1000 CORPORATIONS
  3. 3. Mouthpiece of Owners *In October 1995, the Emilio Yap’s Manila Bulletin, the country’s second largest newspaper, ran daily front-page stories criticizing the awarding of the sale of the Manila Hotel to a Malaysian consortium *The paper asserted that the historic hotel was part of the national patrimony and should therefore be sold to a Filipino company.
  4. 4. Mouthpieces of Owners  In August and September 1996, the Manila Standard owned by Razon's family ran editorials and news stories questioning the awarding by the Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority (SBMA) of the contract for port services to the Hong Kong company Hutchison Ports Philippines Inc.
  5. 5. Proprietorial meddling  Proprietorial meddling is open-ended and outcomes can vary  Some newsrooms are like marketplaces, where bargaining between journalists and owners occurs, and where journalistic principles are often compromised, but sometimes also prevail.
  6. 6. Proprietorial meddling  At some situation in Manila Standard, they leave their editors to decide on what the paper can print often as favors to friends or when they think the reporting has become too critical of key officials  In Manila Bulletin on the extreme , the owner takes the place of editors as gatekeeper of news and information, deciding what readers will find in their morning paper
  7. 7. Proprietorial meddling  In the Philippine daily Inquirer, some editors manage to strike out a relationship where owners have a hand in drafting editorial policy but leave the newsroom decisions to professional journalists  Other newspapers like the Philippine Star or Malaya editors unquestioningly accept the rules set by owners and dutifully execute orders to highlight or kill a story
  8. 8. Philippine Daily Inquirer
  9. 9. Proprietorial meddling  The Inquirer, which started out as a fighting, journalist-owned opposition paper, operates on such mode, even if its main owner, the Prieto family, is involved in businesses that include a paper mill, fast-food chains and real estate
  10. 10. Foundations of modern day newspapering  in the beginning of the 20th century, foundations of modern-day newspapering in the country were laid by American colonizers  American notions of a commercially run, profit-oriented press, brought in modern printing technology, and schooled a generation of Filipino journalists in U.S.-style reporting
  11. 11. Foundations of modern day newspapering  By the 1920s, newspapering was becoming a profitable business, with the expansion of the market for subscribers as well as advertising directed to that market  Lewis Gleeck, took place in the first decades of this century: “the conversion of Filipino journalist of opinion run by politicians into newspapers run as business enterprises.”
  12. 12. Development of Philippine Press  Alejandro Roces –Spanish Mestizo who founded a chain of newspapers and the pioneer of this trend  William Randolph Hearst - U.S. press tycoon and an icon to Filipino press proprietors  Manuel Quezon- a senator, persuaded his millionaire friends to set up the Philippines Herald to serve as a mouthpiece for his political faction
  13. 13. Foundations of modern day newspapering  In the 1930s, the wealthy Elizalde family acquired other newspapers to form the El Debate-Mabuhay-Herald-Monday Mail (DHMM) chain.  In 1938, the chain was leased to J. Amado Araneta, a sugar baron who needed a voice to lobby for a bigger U.S. market for sugar
  14. 14. Foundations of modern day newspapering  In 1947, Eugenio Lopez Sr., bought The Manila Chronicle to help boost his efforts to get congressional action on behalf of sugar planters  I.P. Soliongco and Renato Constantinocountry’s leading crusading journalists work for the Lopez
  15. 15. Foundations of modern day newspapering  Luis R. Mauricio -a Veteran journalist during the Quirino administration and the news editor of the Chronicle and was under pressure from Eugenio Sr. not to highlight anti-Quirino stories  The Lopezes Manila Chronicle was at the lead of the press pack that was stridently critical of Marcos campaign to undermine his presidency

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