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Nachusa meier x r 2011-10-21

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Nachusa Grasslands Overview

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Nachusa meier x r 2011-10-21

  1. 1. Nachusa Grasslands Mary and Alan Meier
  2. 2. Nachusa Grasslands is about 3,000 acres, located near Franklin Grove, Illinois, in Lee and Ogle Counties.
  3. 3. Nachusa Grasslands is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy, a private, non-profit charitable organization. The mission of The Nature Conservancy is to preserve the plants, animals, and natural communities that represent the diversity of life on Earth by protecting the lands and waters they need to survive.
  4. 4. The preserve is celebrating its 25 th Anniversary in 2011. Photo courtesy of Wes Gibson
  5. 5. Since 1986, 32 tracts have been protected, ranging from 10 acres to to 1,000 acres.
  6. 6. Nachusa contains many remnants of rare prairies, Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  7. 7. rocky outcroppings,
  8. 8. savannas,
  9. 9. sandstone ridges,
  10. 10. woodlands, Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  11. 11. and wetlands.
  12. 12. The remaining prairies in North America are now rarer than rainforests. Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  13. 13. By collecting . . .
  14. 14. and planting seeds,
  15. 15. managing invasive weeds and brush,
  16. 16. repairing wetlands,
  17. 17. and returning fire to the ecosystem,
  18. 18. . . . the Nachusa staff and volunteers are helping to restore our natural heritage. Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  19. 19. We are replanting prairie habitats in the farmland between the remnants to create a sustainable natural landscape.
  20. 20. Volunteers play an essential role in maintaining and restoring the preserve.
  21. 21. Some volunteers serve as Stewards, managing specific units on the preserve.
  22. 22. Others help out wherever and whenever they are needed.
  23. 23. Volunteer Activities <ul><li>Brush Clearing </li></ul><ul><li>December to May </li></ul><ul><li>Weed Removal </li></ul><ul><li>May to August </li></ul><ul><li>Seed Picking, Processing, and Planting </li></ul><ul><li>May to November </li></ul><ul><li>Prescribed Burns </li></ul><ul><li>October and November </li></ul><ul><li>March and April </li></ul>
  24. 24. Work days coordinated by Stewards take place every Saturday morning throughout the year.
  25. 25. Training and equipment are provided for all volunteer work days – no experience or expertise is required.
  26. 26. Fire Crews go through extensive training and are highly supervised.
  27. 27. Fire helps to promote species diversity by controlling invasive weeds, shrubs and trees.
  28. 28. Fire also stimulates new plant growth and returns nutrients back to the soil.
  29. 29. Fall – Autumn on the Prairie Celebration Visit Nachusa Grasslands Year-Round! Photo courtesy of Ron Cress
  30. 30. Autumn on the Prairie – Plant ID Walk Photo by Dixon Telegraph
  31. 31. Autumn on the Prairie – Horse-Drawn Wagon Ride Photo courtesy of Ron Cress
  32. 32. Autumn on the Prairie – Walking Tour Photo courtesy of Kirk Hallowell
  33. 33. Winter – Burning Brush Piles
  34. 34. Winter – Work Day Break
  35. 35. Spring – Tour Led by Preserve Manager, Bill Kleiman Photo courtesy of Ron Cress
  36. 36. Spring – Work Day Break
  37. 37. Summer – Playing in the Creek Ford
  38. 38. Summer – An Adventuresome Hike Photo courtesy of Ron Cress
  39. 39. Summer – Friends of Nachusa Grasslands Annual Meeting Photo courtesy of Ron Cress
  40. 40. Friends of Nachusa Grasslands is a nonprofit, tax-exempt entity founded by volunteers and dedicated to supporting Nachusa Grasslands.   The Nature Conservancy and Friends are not affiliated, but the Friends strongly support the Conservancy’s efforts at Nachusa Grasslands.
  41. 41. <ul><li>The goals of the Friends of Nachusa Grasslands are to: </li></ul><ul><li>fund an endowment for the long-term protection of Nachusa Grasslands </li></ul><ul><li>promote volunteerism </li></ul><ul><li>encourage science and education </li></ul><ul><li>at Nachusa Grasslands </li></ul>
  42. 42. Friends, family members, and supporters are invited to our annual Prairie Potluck the fourth Saturday of June.
  43. 43. The Nachusa Headquarters Barn was built in 1867. About ten years ago, it was moved to the site and reconstructed. Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  44. 44. The Barn has a seed processing area, lunch/meeting room, office, loft, garage, and workshop. Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  45. 45. Racks for Drying Seeds Seed Processing Equipment
  46. 46. Seed Racks and Poly Bags Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  47. 47. “ Octopus” for Drying Seeds
  48. 48. Hammermill for Separating Seeds from Chaff
  49. 49. Hammermill with Seed Vacuum
  50. 50. Hammermill Tray with Seeds and Netting
  51. 51. Garbage Can for Collecting Milled Seed
  52. 52. Funnel for Poly Bags
  53. 53. Funnel for Grocery Sacks
  54. 54. Hand Processing Screen and Box
  55. 55. Scale for Weighing Seeds
  56. 56. Seed Barrels
  57. 57. Work Area with Various Supplies
  58. 58. Nachusa’s plant inventory includes at least 855 species. Photo courtesy of Kirk Hallowell
  59. 59. Forbs bloom from May to September and are harvested from spring through late fall.
  60. 60. Plantain Pussy Toes (Antennaria plantaginifolia) Blooms in May
  61. 61. Pick Pussy Toes in May when the seed heads have fluffed out.
  62. 62. Arrow-Leaved Violet (Viola sagittata ) Blooms in May
  63. 63. Blooms in May Birdsfoot Violet (Viola pedata)
  64. 64. Blooms in May Violet Wood Sorrel (Oxalis violacea )
  65. 65. Pick Violets in late May or early June when the seeds are firm.
  66. 66. Prairie Smoke (Geum triflorum )
  67. 67. Prairie Smoke is one of the rarest and most beautiful plants at Nachusa.
  68. 68. Pick Prairie Smoke by hand in late May or early June when the seed heads are very loose.
  69. 69. Shooting Star (Dodecantheeon meadia) Blooms in May
  70. 70. Pick Shooting Star in July when the s eed heads are beginning to open at the top and tiny seeds fall out when the head is held upside down.
  71. 71. Cream Wild Indigo (Baptisia leucophaea) Blooms in May Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  72. 72. Pick Cream Wild Indigo in July or August when most of the seed pods are partially black.
  73. 73. Cream Wild Indigo may be infested with weevils, but there are usually a few seeds present in most pods.
  74. 74. Hoary Puccoon (Lithospermum canescens ) Blooms in May
  75. 75. Pick Hoary Puccoon in June when the seeds are brown.
  76. 76. False Toadflax (Comandra umbellata) Blooms in May
  77. 77. Pick False Toadflax in June when the seeds are hard little balls.
  78. 78. Common Spiderwort (Tradescantia ohiensis) Blooms in May and June Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  79. 79. Pick Spiderwort in July when the pods are turning yellow and haven’t all popped open.
  80. 80. Make sure Spiderwort is completely dry before storing.
  81. 81. Thimbleweed (Anemone cylindrica) Blooms in June
  82. 82. Pick Thimbleweed in September when the seed head has started to fluff and gives no resistance when stripping by hand.
  83. 83. Pale Purple Coneflower (Echinacea pallida) Blooms in June
  84. 84. Nachusa is well-known for its Coneflower abundance.
  85. 85. Pick Coneflower in August when the s eed head is completely black and several inches of stem below the seed head are also black.
  86. 86. Wear gloves when picking or processing Coneflower, as the seed heads are very spiky.
  87. 87. Leadplant (Amorpha canescens) Blooms in June
  88. 88. Leadplant, Pale Purple Coneflower, Coreopsis Palmata , and White Baptisia often grow well in the same area.
  89. 89. Pick Leadplant in September when the s eed heads are grayish brown and the seeds have not yet begun to drop
  90. 90. Goat's Rue (Tephrosia virginiana) Blooms in June
  91. 91. Pick Goat's Rue in September when the seed pods are brown, brittle, and twisted, and at least some pods have split open.
  92. 92. Hill’s Thistle ( Cirsium hillii [pumilu] ) Blooms in June Photo courtesy of Ann Haverstock
  93. 93. Pick Hill’s Thistle in July when the seed head is almost fluffed out. Hill’s Thistle is a threatened species in Illinois.
  94. 94. Prairie June Grass ( Koeleria cristata [macrantha[ ) Blooms in June
  95. 95. Pick Prairie June Grass in July when the seeds and stems are brown and dry.
  96. 96. Wild Lupine ( Lupinus perennis ) Blooms in June
  97. 97. Pick Wild Lupine in June when pods have formed, but have not yet popped.
  98. 98. Philadelphia Lily ( Lilium philadelphicum ) Blooms in June Don’t pick or even touch – just enjoy
  99. 99. Purple Prairie Clover ( Petalostemum or Dalea purpureum ) Blooms in July
  100. 100. Pick Purple Prairie Clover in August when the stems are brown and the seed heads have minimal resistance when hand stripped. Be sure to enjoy the lovely odor.
  101. 101. White Prairie Clover ( Petalostemum or Dalea candidum ) Blooms in July
  102. 102. White Prairie Clover seeds are harder and darker than Purple Prairie Clover ones and should also be picked in August when stems are brown and seed heads have minimal resistance when hand stripped.
  103. 103. Butterfly Weed ( Asclepias tuberosa interior ) Blooms in July
  104. 104. Pick Butterfly Weed in August when the seed pods have split open or can be opened by gently squeezing on the pods.
  105. 105. Wild Quinine ( Parthenium integrifolium ) Blooms in July
  106. 106. Pick Wild Quinine in September when the seed heads are gray.
  107. 107. Flowering Spurge ( Euphorbia corollata ) Blooms in July
  108. 108. Pick Flowering Spurge in September when the seeds are small green balls.
  109. 109. Wild Bergamot ( Monarda fistulosa ) Blooms in July
  110. 110. Pick Wild Bergamot in September when the seed heads are brown.
  111. 111. Prairie Tall Cinquefoil ( Potentilla arguta ) Blooms in July
  112. 112. Pick Prairie Tall Cinquefoil in September when the seed heads are brown or almost brown. Seeds will fall out when held upside down.
  113. 113. Tall Gayfeather; Prairie Blazing Star ( Liatris pycnostachya ) Blooms in July
  114. 114. Pick Prairie Blazing Star in October when the seeds are fluffed. Cut off the top of the head if it’s not completely fluffed and then pick more later when more seeds have matured.
  115. 115. Hairy Hawkweed ( Hieracium longipilum ) Blooms in July through September
  116. 116. Pick Hairy Hawkweed by hand in July through September when the seed heads are fluffy – take only the ripe seeds and leave the rest to mature.
  117. 117. Hoary Vervain ( Verbena stricta ) Blooms in July
  118. 118. Pick Hoary Vervain i n October when the seeds and stems are brown.
  119. 119. Blue Vervain ( Verbena hastata ) Blooms in July
  120. 120. Pick Blue Vervain i n October when the seeds and stems are brown.
  121. 121. Hoary Vervain ( Verbena stricta ) Blooms in July
  122. 122. Blue Vervain ( Verbena hastata ) Blooms in July
  123. 123. Rattlesnake Master ( Eryngium yuccifolium ) Blooms in July
  124. 124. Pick Rattlesnake Master in October when the seed heads are brown, and the stems are starting to turn brown.
  125. 125. Black-Eyed Susan ( Rudbeckia hirta ) Blooms in July
  126. 126. Black-Eyed Susan grows well in early restorations among agricultural and other weeds.
  127. 127. Pick Black-Eyed Susan in August when the seed heads and stems are black.
  128. 128. Rosinweed ( Silphium integrifolium ) Blooms in July
  129. 129. Pick Rosinweed in September when the seed heads are brown and dry.
  130. 130. Rough Blazing Star ( Liatris aspera ) Blooms in August
  131. 131. Rough Blazing Star on Dot’s Knob Photo courtesy of Kirk Hallowell
  132. 132. Pick Rough Blazing Star in October when the seeds are fluffed. Cut off the top of the head if it’s not completely fluffed and then pick more later when more seeds have matured.
  133. 133. Nodding Wild Onion ( Allium cernuum ) Blooms in August
  134. 134. Pick Nodding Wild Onion in September when the seeds are black and at least some pods have opened so that a few seeds are visible.
  135. 135. Round-Headed Bush Clover ( Lespedeza capitata ) Blooms in August
  136. 136. Pick Round-Headed Bush Clover in September when the seed heads are brown.
  137. 137. Compass Plant ( Silphium laciniatum ) Blooms in August
  138. 138. Compass Plants leaves orient themselves in a north to south direction to avoid the direct rays of the midday sun. The leaves are usually quite cold because their roots can be 16 feet deep.
  139. 139. Pick Compass Plant in September when the seed heads are brown and can easily be pulled from the stem.
  140. 140. Pale Indian Plantain ( Cacalia atriplicifolia ) Blooms in July
  141. 141. Pick Pale Indian Plantain in September when the seed heads have fluffed out.
  142. 142. Tall Coreopsis ( Coreopsis tripteris ) Blooms in August
  143. 143. Pick Tall Coreopsis in September when the seed heads are dark brown or black.
  144. 144. Slender Mountain Mint ( Pycnanthemum tenuifolium ) Blooms in August
  145. 145. Pick Slender Mountain Mint in October when the seed heads are completely gray. Be sure to enjoy the aroma of a crushed seed head.
  146. 146. Old Field Goldenrod ( Solidago nemoralis ) Blooms in September
  147. 147. Pick Goldenrod in October when the seed heads are completely or almost completely fluffed out.
  148. 148. Indian Grass ( Sorghastrum nutans ) Blooms in August
  149. 149. Big Bluestem ( Andropogon gerardii ) Blooms in August
  150. 150. Little Bluestem ( Andropogon [ Schizachyrium] scoparium ) Blooms in August
  151. 151. Canada Wild Rye ( Elymus canadensis ) Blooms in August
  152. 152. Pick Little Bluestem in October when the seed heads have fluffed out.
  153. 153. Prairie Gentian ( Gentiana purberulenta ) Blooms in September Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  154. 154. Bottle (or Closed) Gentian ( Gentiana andrewsii ) Blooms in September Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  155. 155. Fringed Gentian ( Gentiana [Gentianopsis] crinita ) Blooms in September Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  156. 156. Pick Gentian in October when the seed pods have turned brown and have split open or can be opened by gently squeezing on the pods. The seeds are small, tan flakes.
  157. 157. Stiff Aster ( Aster linariifolius ) Blooms in September Photo courtesy of Hank and Becky Hartman
  158. 158. Pick Aster in October when the seed heads have fluffed out.
  159. 159. Moths and butterflies abound at Nachusa.
  160. 160. Photo courtesy of Wes Gibson
  161. 163. 196 different bird species have been sighted at Nachusa. Photo courtesy of Wes Gibson Dickcissel ( Spiza americana )
  162. 164. Common Yellowthroat ( Geothlypis trichas ) Photo courtesy of Wes Gibson
  163. 165. Red-Winged Blackbird ( Agelaius phoeniceus ) Photo courtesy of Wes Gibson
  164. 166. Wild Turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo )
  165. 167. Nachusa Grasslands is home to many insect species, including: Bees
  166. 168. Walking Sticks
  167. 169. Spiders
  168. 170. Dragonflies Photo courtesy of Wes Gibson
  169. 171. Grasshoppers
  170. 172. www.nature.org www.nachusagrasslands.org

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