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Impact Plan: Coffee + Crypto

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This impact plan provides a media strategy for the advocacy video project Coffee + Crypto. Created by Addie Wagenknecht of Deep Lab, the project uses make-up tutorial tropes to inform women about how to protect themselves from surveillance by abusive romantic partners.

Funded by the Mozilla Foundation through the generous support of the Open Society Foundation and under the auspices of Harmony Labs, this plan provided Addie with a strategy for using her videos to show women in abusive relationships privacy protection methods relevant to their lives and contexts. It is shared here with the consent of its creator.

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Impact Plan: Coffee + Crypto

  1. 1. IMPACT PLAN Coffee + Crypto image: thesassynut.com Mozilla Stories of Surveillance Mary Joyce | June 7, 2018 | v1.1 HARMONY LABS 311 W 43rd St, 12th fl. New York, NY 10036 +1 212 966 7606 mary@harmonylabs.org harmonylabs.org
  2. 2. CONTENTS BEGIN Problem Statement…………………………………………………..………………..……………..………………...3 About Coffee + Crypto…..........……..…………………………..…...............…….…....................……...4 STRATEGY Objective...……………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………....6 Theory of Change…………………………………………………………………..……………………………….….....7 Timeline…………………………………………………………………..……………………………….…......................8 Audience..….………………………………………………………………………………………………………………......9 Distribution……………………………………………………..…………..……………….…..................................10 Measurement………………………………………………………..……………………………….….........................11 APPENDIX User Interview Basics………….……...................................................……………………………….…....13 Journalist Outreach Template…...................................................……………………………….….....14 The Start-up Approach to Advocacy Media…...........................……………………………….…....15 Glossary …………………………………………………………………………….…………..…..……………………...….16
  3. 3. 3 image: prettydesigns.com * Defined in Glossary Most women who came into Deep Lab’s opsec* workshops said that commonly presented threat models weren't relevant to their lives. PROBLEM STATEMENT
  4. 4. image: xdesktopwallpapers.com ABOUT COFFEE + CRYPTO is a set of three to five videos for women who lack understanding of programming and technology but need to protect themselves from intimate partner surveillance*. image: Flickr/pumpkincat210 * Defined in Glossary
  5. 5. STRATEGYimage: skinworkswellness.com
  6. 6. OBJECTIVE 6 Empower WOMEN to protect themselves from SURVEILLANCE by abusive PARTNERS. image: Flickr/pumpkincat210
  7. 7. THEORY OF CHANGE * 7 * Defined in Glossary Through the online channels of women’s shelters and women/tech media Empower women to protect themselves from surveillance by abusive partners. Outline 3-5 episodes based on threat models developed from user interviews; start pre-production Distribution September Metrics collection and review Development Late May - Early June Results Analysis September-October Shoot and develop episodes based on the outlined content; edit in July and August with launch to parallel ‘back to school’ periods; get feedback from audience as you go Production Late June - August Audience Outreach May Do user interviews with women who have experienced intimate partner surveillance to develop threat model & learn media preferences; include Emily, Lindsay, Jennifer; ask shelter staff about mass distribution lists Objective October
  8. 8. TIMELINE 8 Research Production Distribution May June July August September October Audience Outreach User interviews w/ surveilled women Outline Feedback Ask: “Is this helpful?” Metrics ** Collect, analyze Production Shoot and develop episodes based on the outlined content Shelter Channels Learn mass distro lists from shelter staff Content Development Outline 3-5 episodes based on threat models IDed in interviews Pre-Production Actors, equipment, locations * See Journalist Outreach Template, pg. 14 **See Measurement, pg. 11 Editing Shoot and develop episodes based on the outlined content Rough Cut Feedback Ask: “How does this match your expectations?” Production Design Feedback Ask: “Do you like this style? Is this engaging?” Draft Feedback Ask: “How does this email look?” Outreach Email video to shleter lists, journalists** Journalists Ask Deep Lab network for contacts
  9. 9. AUDIENCE 9 AGE 32-37 GEOGRAPHY urban and rural US GENDER female WORK varies (SAHM, tech sector professional, unemployed, in school) PLATFORMS heavy Facebook users, IG lurker SUMMARY 30’s women digitally surveilled by current/former partner EDUCATION varies (HS to college) PARTNER SURVEILLANCE • Emily - Still in relationship, lives together but believes he has hacked her phone to know her location and call logs because he shows up where she is without notice • Lindsay - Ex-boyfriend, lived together for 6 yrs, was emotionally/physically abusive, has access to her email and laptop via remote access and passwords • Jennifer - Had 2 children with ex- partner, who maintains custody of them on weekends, knows her location and who she is with and has threatened her subsequent boyfriends even without her introducing them to him ECONOMICS middle class Flickr/Hotlanta Voyeur, Alex D Stewart, Dave Rosenblum; leannmcguire.com LEISURE mindful, solitary, creative (stitch n’ bitch knitting, running, meditation, yoga, homebody) POLITICS apolitical ETHNICITY mostly white
  10. 10. DISTRIBUTION 10 REACHING THREATENED WOMEN ONLINE Because the audience is not technically savvy, they may not know they are being surveilled by an intimate partner. This distribution plan aims to reach these women online whether or not they are aware that they are under threat. • Aware Shelter Websites • Women who know they are in crisis may Google a local shelter, and it would be great if they found the video on the shelter’s website. Perhaps also the shelter’s social media? • Get one shelter to post the video through direct contact with your friends who work there. • Use that shelter as an example when you promote the video over shelter network listservs or private Facebook pages. (You will identify these mass distribution channels at the same time you identify women to speak with in your research phase.) • Unaware Feminist/Tech Websites • Some women may be surveilled, yet not know it. • For this reason, the video should reach them where they are -- literally -- through feminist themed websites like Jezebel, HuffPost Women, Ars Technica. • Use Deep Lab network to identify journalists that work at these or similar outlets.
  11. 11. MEASUREMENT 11 MEASURING RESPONSE FROM A NARROW AUDIENCE The episodes target women surveilled by their partners, but it will be difficult to measure whether viewers come from this exact demographic. Qualitative metrics, mostly comments, will provide some sense of who is watching, but not at scale Metric Definition Value Strength Weakness Views # of views/ episode Measures exposure to content Can track on YouTube and Facebook Doesn’t tell you who is watching, only how many Shares # of shares/ episode Measures whether those who watch it find it valuable Can track on YouTube and Facebook Doesn’t tell you who found it useful Articles # of articles written about the project Measures legitimacy conveyed by media attention Can track with a Google Alert; Outlet readership gives some idea of who is seeing the content Outlet readership will be much broader than the intended audience. Comments content of written responses wherever video is posted Measures actual value to audience (“Thanks, this helped me so much!”) Actually tells you when the video achieved its objective Doesn’t scale (few viewers will leave a comment); Time- consuming to read comments
  12. 12. APPENDIX image: Flickt/Stven Depolo
  13. 13. USER INTERVIEW BASICS CORNERSTONE OF HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN User interviews are a research technique used in technology design that aim to understand a user’s needs from their past behavior. Here are the basics: • Logistics Plan Well • Meet in person, if possible. • Have questions prepared. • Expect to talk for 45 minutes. • Record the audio (not video) of the interview with the subject’s permission. • Trust Put Her at Ease • The women will be divulging painful and very personal details of their lives, which they have likely not processed and may very well feel ashamed of. • Be warm. Be gentle. Be authentic. Be gracious. Never judge. • Start with easy questions: “What activities do you use your phone for?” “Tell me a bit about your partner” before asking harder questions: “What first made you suspect that you were being surveilled?” • If you don’t truly need to know it -- i.e., “Has he ever hit you?” -- don’t ask. • Information Get What You Came for • Your end goal is to develop a threat model based on this women’s experience. Write your questions with that objective in mind. • Ask open-ended questions: “Tell me about the last time you___ ?” “How did you ___?” “What’s an example of that?” “What happened when you___?” “Say more.” • Ask the subject about past experiences -- “What appeared on the screen?” “And then what did he do?” -- not for her interprepretions or impressions. (That’s your job.) 13 “Converse like a talkshow host, think like a writer, understand subtext like a psychiatrist and have a ear like a musician” — Lawrence Grobel
  14. 14. JOURNALIST OUTREACH TEMPLATE FOR “COLD CALLS” Ideally you will get connected to journalists through the members of Deep Lab, where the exact content of the email will be less important because their is a pre-existing relationship. However, here is a “cold call” email outreach template if you need one. SUBJECT: #MeToo Next Step: Fighting Intimate Partner Surveillance Hi [First Name], I really loved your story [Title] in [Publication] back in [Year], so I thought you’d be interested in Coffee +Cryto, a set of satrical videos I created was an amazing group of female collaborators to teach other women how to protect themselves from digital surveillance by current and former partners. We feel this kind of empowerment is the next step of the #MeToo movement. I’m eager for you to see the videos and tell me what you think. My phone number is below for your convenience. Cheers, [Your Name; Title] [Your Mobile Number] 14
  15. 15. THE STARTUP APPROACH TO ADVOCACY MEDIA 15 ENGAGE YOUR AUDIENCE FIRST In advocacy media, the audience is often engaged at the end of the creative process through promotion and marketing. Sometimes content lands and is popular. Sometimes it doesn’t and isn’t. This guessing game is an unnecessary waste of resources and drain on creator morale. Tech startups take a different approach. Because they have limited time and money and operate in an environment of uncertaintly, startups engage users first. They test incremental elements of their product continuously, constantly learning and incorporating user feedback. Low resources? Little time? Uncertainty? Many advocacy media projects fit that description. Switch “user” for “audience” and a new strategy appears. Instead of engaging your audience at the end, engage them at the beginning. Test elements of your video with a small group of audience members, such as the women you interview. Getting feedback need not be complicated. These questions can be asked over snacks, in a phone call, by email, via text message. Just get that audience input! This constant audience feedback takes the guesswork out of advocacy media. You will already have an evidence-based belief that your audience will like your video before you even begin writing the blog post or email a journalist. And you’ll have greater impact as a result.
  16. 16. GLOSSARY 16 Advocacy Speaking on behalf of a group in order to maintain or increase their collective welfare. Audience The individuals one seeks to persuade or mobilize through exposure to a piece of media. Channel A means of distribution (i.e., word of mouth, email list X, email list Y, news story X, news story Y) Impact Change resulting from an advocacy project. Intimate Partner Surveillance Nonconsensual observation by a person with whom one has or has had a romantic and/or sexual relationship. Objective Ultimate goal or desired impact of an advocacy activity. Opsec Operational security; undertaking measures that eliminate or reduce adversary exploitation of critical information. Metric A numeric measurement that allows an individual to track project activities (i.e., site visits per day; sign-ups per thousand page views; RSVPs per hundred invitations). Theory of Change High-level impact roadmap whose dependencies lead from the present to the realization of a future change objective.
  17. 17. ABOUT THIS IMPACT PLAN This plan was co-created by Addie Wageknecht for Coffee + Crypto and Mary Joyce for Harmony Labs. STORIES OF SURVEILLANCE Stories of Surveillance is a Mozilla program, produced in partnership with the Open Society Foundation and MIT Open Documentary Lab. It supports the work of media activists creating work that challenges surveillance culture. MOZILLA FOUNDATION Dedicated to promoting openness, innovation and opportunity on the Web, the Mozilla Foundation is a California not-for-profit corporation dedicated to the public benefit. HARMONY LABS Based in New York City, Harmony Labs is on a mission to understand media influence at scale, and to experiment with media to support an open, resilient, democratic society. 17
  18. 18. THANK YOU Please direct questions to mary@harmonylabs.org. c

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