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Carolina Unlocked Slide 1 Carolina Unlocked Slide 2 Carolina Unlocked Slide 3 Carolina Unlocked Slide 4 Carolina Unlocked Slide 5 Carolina Unlocked Slide 6 Carolina Unlocked Slide 7 Carolina Unlocked Slide 8 Carolina Unlocked Slide 9 Carolina Unlocked Slide 10 Carolina Unlocked Slide 11 Carolina Unlocked Slide 12 Carolina Unlocked Slide 13 Carolina Unlocked Slide 14 Carolina Unlocked Slide 15 Carolina Unlocked Slide 16 Carolina Unlocked Slide 17 Carolina Unlocked Slide 18 Carolina Unlocked Slide 19 Carolina Unlocked Slide 20 Carolina Unlocked Slide 21 Carolina Unlocked Slide 22 Carolina Unlocked Slide 23 Carolina Unlocked Slide 24 Carolina Unlocked Slide 25 Carolina Unlocked Slide 26 Carolina Unlocked Slide 27 Carolina Unlocked Slide 28 Carolina Unlocked Slide 29 Carolina Unlocked Slide 30
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MEJO 377 Magazine Project

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Carolina Unlocked

  1. 1. CAROLINA UNL CKED women’s lacrosse women’s field hockey women’s rowing dance team LINDSAY HARRIS September 2020 Issue HEAR FROM THE HEELS “WHO DO YOU PLAY FOR???”“I wouldn’t be alive if it wasn’t for her.” “...maybe one day those who can’t, can.” “I’ve always been a Tar Heel fan because of my mom.” “He’s always been the one to come to everything.”
  2. 2. Carolina Unlocked Our Mission Our goal as a magazine is to provide our readers with unique insights into UNC-Chapel Hill athletics. We provide feature stories on our athletes including life outside of sports. We dive deep into what makes these players who they are, and we wish to give readers a story that they cannot get anywhere else. These athletes are more than their sport, and they have a story to tell. Carolina Unlocked is here to be the voice of these student-athletes. We choose to feature athletes ranging from all sports because everyone deserves to be in the spotlight. Our first issue features four women athletes because it is important to us that women in sports are recognized just as much as men. Our magazine is not limited to only women’s sports, and is open to covering athletes from all teams. This “Who do you play for?” issue brings attention to some of the less recognized sports at UNC including the dance team and the rowing team. Carolina Unlocked exists to inspire readers to see athletes as more than their statistics. 1
  3. 3. Extras September 2020 Issue 1 15 26 07 08 Features 03 27 09 03 09 17 22 The fight for Life The next generation All for a smile Rowing her way into a new look on life Maggie Skillman describes how lacrosse brought her life full circle Brooke Behan reveals why she dedicates her time to field hockey Lindsay Harris explains why the dance team means so much to her Zoe Rose discusses how her rowing events led to family bonding UNC women’s lacrosse players rediscover the meaning behind playing UNC Crossword Puzzle Coronavirus cancels the season 2020 season schedules17 Learn more about UNC Pitt Hopkins Research 22 CONTENTS 2
  4. 4. Terry Nehring-Redmon holding Maggie Skillman The Fight For lifeBy: Avery Bain .... 3
  5. 5. She knows that she should not be alive, let alone be able to play Division I lacrosse today. She has been a fighter since the first day of her life, and that mentality will follow her until her last, said her NICU nurse Terry Nehring-Redmon. A bond beginning at Maggie’s birth has reminded her how one person can change your life for the better. Maggie Skillman was born severely premature at 26 weeks with her twin sister, Caroline, at the University of North Carolina Children’s Hospital in 2000. Maggie was on vents, had workups for sepsis and several IV’s for delivering nutrition, said Nehring-Redmon. She had so many tubes, she looked like a real-life version of the Operation game board. “My dad was told that he could lose both his wife and his children because of how dangerous the emergency C-section was,” Maggie said. Steve Skillman was finishing his MBA at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the time. Imagine forgetting how to do one thing your body is trained to do– breathe. In the time it took you to read the paragraphs above, Maggie and her sister would have gone without a single breath. How many did you take? Both Skillman girls had apnea of prematurity and would have needed stimulation and caffeine to be able to continue reading and breathing. “My dad’s wedding band could slide all the way up to my hips,” Maggie said, “The reason I am alive is entirely because of my NICU nurse.” She remembers her dad joking about how her and her sister looked more like birds than humans. To be fair, Steve didn’t have anything to compare them to since they were his first and only children. Nehring-Redmon was Maggie’s primary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit nurse, meaning that she would take care of her whenever she was scheduled to work. She remembers being very upset if for some reason she couldn’t have the girls for her shift because she felt a huge sense of responsibility for them. She had a nurturing instinct and said that “No one could take care of them the same way I would. I absolutely loved the girls.” Her relationship with Sarah and Steve, Maggie’s parents, blossomed in the NICU but grew overtime, she said. “We all had a common goal to get the girls home.” The Skillman girls were discharged, and their family moved to Boston after two months. The Skillman’s stayed in touch with the NICU nurse through Christmas cards and email exchanges. Nehring-Redmon began visiting Cape Cod every year, making a special stop to see the Skillman family. “Some families you get really close to and the Skillman’s were one of those families for me,” she said, “I looked forward to seeing them every year.” As Maggie grew up, she wanted nothing more than to be a Tar Heel. She was truly born and bred. “I wanted to go to Carolina before I even knew what college was. My parents definitely brainwashed me, but in the best way,” Maggie said. This was the beginning of Maggie drinking the Carolina Blue Kool-Aid. . . . ..... Maggie in the NICU 4
  6. 6. She started playing lacrosse for her school and her town at a young age, but it wasn’t until she had two serious concussions in middle school when she began playing goalie. “Before that, I played wherever the coach put me,” Maggie said. However, her athletic trainer told her that playing goalie was the only safe option if she wanted to continue playing lacrosse. “I had never touched a lacrosse goalie stick before I met him,” Maggie said, talking about her goalie coach, Bill Daye. “Almost everything I know is because of him.” Daye attended Carolina and played on the men’s lacrosse team, winning the Atlantic Coast Conference championship all four years and the national championship in 1991. “He changed my goal from wanting to be a student at Carolina to wanting to be a student-athlete at Carolina,” Maggie said. And so, the Kool-Aid began tasting sweeter. During her senior year of high school, Maggie decided to take a break from lacrosse. “I wanted to put my time and energy elsewhere for something that was more meaningful to me,” Maggie said. She ran the Boston Marathon instead, raising $17,000 for the Boston Children’s Hospital. Nehring-Redmon explains that this decision of Maggie’s exemplifies her selflessness and yearning to give back to the community. Maggie’s journey to landing in Chapel Hill was unique. She took the path less traveled. After attending many recruiting events and summer camps, she was offered a walk-on spot on the UNC Women’s Lacrosse team. In order for this offer to remain, Maggie needed to be accepted into UNC without the help from admissions that secured athletes would normally receive. Unfortunately, she was not accepted on her first try. Nobody advertises that the path less traveled is also longer, uphill, and unknown. Nevertheless, Maggie persisted. She was familiar with the road less traveled, as she had endured it before, being only days old. “I thought that lacrosse was an amazing chapter of my life, but it was time to start a new one,” Maggie explains. She spent her first year at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Maggie then transferred to UNC as a sophomore, focusing solely on her academic career. Maggie’s relationship with her NICU nurse strengthened once they were both settled in Chapel Hill. “I think of Maggie as part of my family, especially since she is now at school at UNC,” Nehring-Redmon added. Maggie marks this as a turning point in their relationship as becoming one between just the two of them rather than one through her parents. Phil Barnes, assistant coach of the women’s lacrosse team, contacted Maggie a few months into her sophomore year to extend the same walk-on offer he had a few years ago. Maggie is now the team’s third goalkeeper and has accomplished her goal of becoming a student-athlete at Carolina. “The ability to share being a Tar Heel with anyone is special, but the fact that she is a student-athlete at the greatest institution in the United States is even better,” said her goalie coach. .... 2004 2020 5
  7. 7. Maggie played in her first collegiate game against Davidson College, a moment she had been dreaming about since she was young. “Coming back and playing a quarter-mile from the place that I could have died is absolutely profound,” Maggie said. She warmed up with her fellow teammates, extremely nervous. “They gassed me up and got me excited and confident. They reminded me that I had worked hard to get here.” She walked over to sub-in when Ally Mastroianni, a junior midfielder, grabbed her helmet and whispered “you can do this.” “I’m sure in the moment it didn't mean that much to her because she's a junior and starts every game, but it meant a lot to me and gave me confidence,” Maggie said. It was time. Maggie’s parents anticipated that she would get to play in this game and didn’t want to miss the moment or have to watch it on television. They didn’t have to and neither did Maggie’s NICU nurse, as they both cheered Maggie on from the stands. Maggie realized that she had the same supporter waiting for her at the end of both uphill battles of her life– her NICU nurse. “It was so emotional to get to play in front of her so close to where she saved my life,” Maggie said. “I was so proud of her. It brought tears to my eyes,” Nehring-Redmon said, “It is amazing to see what an incredible adult she has turned into. I can only hope that my kids aspire to achieve such lofty goals like Maggie has set for herself.” Maggie expressed how rewarding it is to see her life come full-circle by returning to where her life started with the same person by her side throughout the journey. “I play for my nurse because she gave me my life and ability to play at Carolina. Without her, I would literally not be here,” Maggie said, “I also play for all of the other NICU babies that won't have the chance to play or get to do what they love. I am very lucky.” In a way, Maggie is one of the people Nehring-Redmon “plays for,” as they fuel each other’s inspiration to do what they love. “There are times when I wonder if what I do really matters, when life gets you down. Knowing that I made a difference in Maggie's life and even the lives of the Skillman's as a family, makes me continue working as hard as I can for the families with children in the NICU,” she said. Nehring-Redmon said that the Skillman’s have been the closest she has ever been to a family she helped in the NICU, expressing that she has been close to many families, but they usually lose touch over the years. “That's the thing that boggles my mind”, Maggie said. “Why wouldn’t you keep in touch with the people who saved your life? They deserve so much at the very least they should get an update on how I’m doing.” For the Skillman’s and Terry, their relationship goes far beyond an update. Maggie’s NICU nurse has gotten to watch her grow from the moment she held her in her hands as a newborn to witnessing the woman and athlete she is today. Both Maggie and Terry know that they can count on each other’s support for every day that tomorrow brings. Somehow, the Kool-Aid tastes better when you fought twice as hard to get it. . . . . Nehring-Redmon and Maggie at the UNC vs. Davidson game 6
  8. 8. 7 WHy do you play? By: Sydney Davis Women’s lacrosse coach at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Jenny Levy, sent out a letter to her team on February 5, 2020. This wasn’t just any letter. She described her journey of how she fell in love with lacrosse, how she worked to become a collegiate lacrosse player and how she stepped up to the coaching position at UNC-Chapel Hill. In the letter she stated. “Lacrosse, through you, I watched the power of collective hard work, belief and selflessness transform young women into champions for life.” However, the letter wasn’t intended to just spread her story. She wrote this letter with hopes that her players would find the reason why they play lacrosse. Levy saw this as a self-discovery opportunity for her players. If the UNC women’s lacrosse 2020 Coach Jenny Levy players knew why they continued to play in college, they could use that motive to drive their performance throughout the season. Levy ended the letter with “Lacrosse, you have had the single biggest impact on the trajectory of my life, I promise to pay it forward, with you by my side, of course.” Over the next month, the team dedicated time to discovering what drives them to play. The results of this exercise were valuable for both the players and the team as a whole: they grew closer and became more motivated to play. This inspired Levy to forward the email to other UNC-CH Varsity teams to encourage all players to find “why do you play” and “who do you play for.”
  9. 9. Carolina Crossword Fill out this crossword with the last names of UNC athletes or coaches by using the clues below! Check your answers on Page 20 13 2 1 43 7 11 12 109 65 8 Across Down 3- Basketball player who is featured in the movie Space Jam 7- Leads “the bigs” on the basketball team and is from Auburn 8- Highest scorer in the Women’s Soccer 2019 season 9- Known for hosting “Late Night” 12- Soccer player who has her own foundation for bone marrow research 13- Left UNC in 2019 to go play for the Chicago Bulls 1- From New York and now plays for the North Carolina Courage in the National Women’s Soccer League 2- 2019 Women’s Field Hockey Player of the Year 4- Has led his team to 22 National Championships 5- Has coached the varsity football team twice 6- Named ACC Rookie of the Year and ACC Offensive Player of the Year in the 2019 football season 10- Who the Dean Dome is named after 11- Basketball player who when cheered for, it often sounded like “Boooo” 8
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  12. 12. Brooke (upper row to the right) stands with her team after winning the national championship 11
  13. 13. 12 Brooke (bottom row on the right) sits in front of the Old Well with her teammates
  14. 14. 13 Brooke (second row, fifth from the left) celebrates win with her team Brooke (right) stands with her teammate and their NCAA National Championship trophies
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  21. 21. 20 Across 3- Michael JORDAN 7- Garrison BROOKS 8- Alessia RUSSO 9- Roy WILLIAMS 12- Mia HAMM 13- Coby WHITE Down 1- Crystal DUNN 2- Erin MATSON 4- Anson DORRANCE 5- Mack BROWN 6- Sam HOWELL 10- Dean SMITH 11- Luke MAYE Across 3-MichaelJORDAN 7-GarrisonBROOKS 8-AlessiaRUSSO 9-RoyWILLIAMS 12-MiaHAMM 13-CobyWHITE Down 1-CrystalDUNN 2-ErinMATSON 4-AnsonDORRANCE 5-MackBROWN 6-SamHOWELL 10-DeanSMITH 11-LukeMAYE crossword answers
  22. 22. FIND YOUR LEGACY WHOEVER YOU DO IT FOR JUST DO IT. 1985 1991 2020 2018 1972 2012 21
  23. 23. 22 With a family tree drenched in Carolina blue, attending the university was hardly a tough decision for Lindsay Harris. The family member that inspires her the most however, is a 7-year-old girl. Harris began dancing at 3 years old following in the footsteps of her sister Caroline and the generations before her. She remembers watching the UNC cheerleaders as a little girl and thinking, “That could be me.” Lindsay wouldn’t even be here today if it weren’t for the UNC cheerleading team in the 90’s. Her dad, Jason, was assigned to be the one tossing her mom, Jenny, in the air. Stunt partners. And one day, life partners. “I never imagined that I would meet my future husband, but we got to have so many special memories together. It’s been so fun getting to share our love for Carolina with our family,” Jenny said. Just like Lindsay, Jenny was born and raised a UNC girl. Her sister was on the dance team, Jenny Harris Jason Harris and her two brothers each played safety for Carolina football. Jenny’s dad was, some would say, the stud of the family as the quarterback for the football team from 1965- 1969. After her older sister left home to dance at UNC, Harris said it was the first two years of her life dancing without her. Lindsay knew wherever she went to college, she wanted to dance. “After 10 years of competitive dance I wasn’t ready to give that up,” Harris said. Her top choice, as you can imagine, was UNC. With no dance scholarships available, she would have to rely on grades alone. So, she developed a stellar work ethic while at All for a Smile By: Kyndall Vaughan Lindsay Harris dancing on the beach
  24. 24. 23 her private high school in High Point, North Carolina. She went to dance practice nearly every day to perfect her craft, and she put in that same grind towards her schoolwork. Harris says she was ecstatic when she got the acceptance to the university, but she was even more overjoyed when she made the dance team. Finally, she could dance with her sister again. And she wouldn’t feel bad for breaking the legacy. Harris was thinking about more than just her immediate family, however. It turns out that there was another little girl out there who was smiling ear to ear happy to be part of a Carolina family. That little girl is Harris’s cousin, Logan Bomar. Her parents are Brooke and David Bomar. David is Jenny’s brother, the former UNC football safety. These two were even set up on a blind date by their dads who, you’ll never guess, played football together at UNC. Their first date involved the infamous Tar Heel restaurant, Top of the Hill. No where else would have been fitting. In 2012, three years after they got married, they had Logan, a joyful and healthy baby girl. Six months into her life, Logan’s parents began to notice that she wasn’t meeting her baby milestones like sitting up and rolling around regularly. Taking no chances, they consulted their pediatrician who pointed them to neurologists, developmental specialists and a geneticist. After an MRI and some other testing, the doctors received all normal results. “No one could pinpoint anything,” said Logan’s mom. Logan’s parents put her in physical, speech and occupational therapy to try and help her get back on track. Soon, she was diagnosed with an eye condition that some doctors jumped to assume was the cause of her developmental issues. They were wrong. She had surgery to fix this condition, but it was determined that she also had Cortical Visual Impairment, meaning her brian struggles to process what she sees. Was this the cause of her developmental problems? For three years, Logan’s mom searched for answers, and one day she found Dr. Yong-Hui Jiang at Duke University. By a stroke of luck they got into his office, and he ordered in- depth genetic testing. Nearly a year later, the results came back. Pitt Hopkins syndrome. Pitt Hopkins is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by developmental delay. The genetic disorder affects a specific gene in chromosome 18, called TCF4. What does that mean? Logan’s parents asked the same question. As moms do, Brooke took to Google, to Facebook, to anything that may be helpful. She learned the rarity of Pitt Hopkins as only around 500 individuals Logan Bomar
  25. 25. worldwide have been affected by the disease. Dr. Jiang reassured the family not to stress about the number of cases and the minimal research because this was all relatively new. He pointed them to a Facebook group of families affected by the condition. Logan’s mom says this was life-changing and has provided the family with hope. Even though the road ahead of Logan isn’t extremely clear, they are eager to see what the future holds. Now what does this have to do with Lindsay? She has committed part of her life to help bring awareness to Pitt Hopkins. “I want to use the gifts I’ve been blessed with to raise awareness to the families who have been affected by this disease,” Harris said. Not only is Lindsay a gifted dancer, she is also an artist. Her senior year of high school, Harris hosted an art show to raise money for the Pitt Hopkins Research Foundation (PHRF). She single-handedly planned the entire event. The show was held at FurnitureLand South, which her dad, Logan’s godfather/uncle, owns. She held a silent auction for the pieces including some of her own and some of her sister’s work. The event was a success and raised over $7000 for Pitt Hopkins research. The Bomar family came home with some artwork for Logan’s room and money to help discover a treatment for her rare condition. This syndrome has touched the entire Bomar/Harris family as Harris’s sister Caroline hosted a “dance-a-thon” in 2017 to raise money and awareness for the PHRF. Her event was a huge hit. The Pitt Hoppin’ brought in ...only around 500 individuals worldwide have been affected by the disease. over $14,000 from ticket sales, donations, and the silent auction that all went to the PHRF. Lindsay got to experience first hand the research that her family helped fund. Ben Philpot, PhD, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology at the UNC School of Medicine, extended Harris the opportunity to come intern in his lab on UNC’s campus. She was able to witness the work that goes on in an effort to help people like her cousin who are affected by Pitt Hopkins. According to Philpot they are working to create a treatment for the core symptoms of Pitt Hopkins syndrome. Philpot’s research is funded by the PHRF, but in October of 2019 the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) granted his lab $1.68 million over five years in order to develop a therapy to treat people with Pitt Hopkins. Harris said it was an amazing opportunity to be able to watch the researchers, and she feels blessed to have played a small part in it. She is thankful that some of the main research is happening at UNC because it is so close to Logan’s family. Logan is a shining light in her family despite any diagnosis. Lindsay says, “She’s enough just as she is and brings joy to us with her tight hugs and big smiles.” Caroline says Logan inspires her to “face each day with courage and a smile.” 24 Caroline (left) and Lindsay (right)
  26. 26. 25 The Harris sisters aren’t the only ones who love to dance either. Logan has a great rhythm and loves dancing around according to her mom. She can’t quite walk on her own because Pitt Hopkins affects her motor ability, but they are working on it. Logan is a certified Carolina girl herself. On October 11, 2017, she was able to solidify her part of the family’s Carolina athletics legacy. According to Brooke, that day was one of the best in the books for Logan and her family. With the help of her parents, Logan was able to go out to midfield of Kenan Memorial Stadium for the coin toss before the football game against the University of Notre Dame. This day was more than just the flip of a coin for Logan. Before her big moment in the spotlight, she was able to meet head basketball coach Roy Williams, head football coach at the time Larry Fedora and Atlantic Coast Conference football referee Gary Patterson among many other people thrilled to talk to her. Logan was very fun and engaging with everyone she came in contact with. Her mom says that she was thrilled Logan felt comfortable to be her silly self with everyone. To Logan and her family, one of the most important people in attendance was Dr. Philpot. According to her mom, Philpot is not only an amazing scientist but also a kind and genuine man. “He is now a part of our family,” said Logan’s mom. Logan is now 7 years old and is still bringing joy to her family everyday. Her mom says Logan, along with her two brothers, Jack and Wes Bomar, are growing up to be incredible little people. Logan meets each day with a smile and “the most contagious laugh that is pure and genuine,” said her mom. Even with her condition causing it hard to do daily activities sometimes, Logan is able to smile brightly in the face of her diagnosis. Harris says she is truly blessed to be able to help her sweet cousin in any way possible. She says she wants nothing but to keep that precious smile on Logan’s face. Her cousin motivates her to always dance with a smile of her own. Lindsay says she strives to use her God-given abilities to bring awareness to Pitt Hopkins and all of the families, like her own, who have been touched by this disease. She says she works hard so that “maybe one day those who can’t, can.” Lindsay dances for her Carolina family, specifically her cousin Logan Bomar. Lindsay UNC Dance
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  28. 28. 27 see 'the tar heels in action football women's field hockey men's basketball Women's lacrosse women's rowing Go to GoHeels.com to find their schedules!
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  30. 30. Avery Bain Mary-Bowen Barringer Sydney Davis Kyndall Vaughan

MEJO 377 Magazine Project

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