Pre-A Guided Literacy Group

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This is a pre-Level a early literacy procedure developed by Jan Richardson.

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Pre-A Guided Literacy Group

  1. 1. Closing the Achievement Gap in Kindergarten -Mary Ann Reilly Based on the Work of Jan RichardsonAlphabet Book Working with Working with Working with Interactive Letters & Names Sounds Books WritingBecoming a…
  2. 2. Alphabet Book: Procedures M m • Make a simple ABC book with large letters and common pictures. • Select students who could benefit from the tutoring. • Pair each student with a tutor. • The tutor helps the student read the entire alphabet book once each day, • The student traces the letter with his/her 1-on-1 finger, says the name of the letter, and points to the picture and names it. (ex. A Instruction. a apple) • If the student does not know the letter 5 minute lesson. name, the tutor says it and as the student repeat the letter while tracing. • If the student needs help with letter formation, the tutor guides the student in tracing the letter correctly.Alphabet Book Letters & Names Working with Working with Interactive Sounds Books Writing
  3. 3. Effect of Tracing an Alphabet Book • Kindergarten students were tested in October, 2004. 27 students could identify 5 or less letters with 11 students unable to identify any letters. After only 18 tracing lessons, the students were retested. The average gain in letter recognition for these students was +12 letters. Two students did not change their scores (0, 2)—everyone else did gain. Range of gains was 3 to 45. Jan Richardson, 2005. National Reading Recovery Conference. Alphabet Book Letters & Names Working with Working with Interactive Sounds Books Writing
  4. 4. Letters and Names 1. Letter Sorts: Shape, color, feature, links with names, words & sounds 2. Letter Formation: Teach simple verbal directions with letter formation – In the air, on the table, on the white board 3. ABC Books/Charts: Choral reading saying letter name and picture. Connect letters to students’ names 4. Name Activities: Puzzles, magnetic letters, rainbow writingAlphabet Book Letters & Names Working with Working with Interactive Sounds Books Writing
  5. 5. Working with Sounds: Syllables 1. Syllables: Clap syllables in names and pictures. Alphabet Book Letters & Names Working with Working with Interactive Sounds Books Writing
  6. 6. Working with Sounds: Picture Sorts2. Choose 2 consonants, beginning with the letters whose names mimic their sound and link to students’ names. Distribute 3-4 pictures to each student that begin with those 2 letters. If necessary support students in saying the picture, saying the beginning sound, and saying the name of the letter that matches the sound. Alphabet Book Letters & Names Working with Working with Interactive Sounds Books Writing
  7. 7. Picture Sorts: K and P Alphabet Book Letters & Names Working with Working with Interactive Sounds Books Writing
  8. 8. Working with Sounds: Phoneme Segmentation Phoneme Segmentation: Help Students segment simple words (orally) – 2 to 3 phonemes. Alphabet Book Letters & Names Working with Working with Interactive Sounds Books Writing
  9. 9. Working with Sounds: Work with Rhyme Work with Rhyme: Sort pictures that rhyme, play with rhyming words. Alphabet Book Letters & Names Working with Working with Interactive Sounds Books Writing
  10. 10. Working with Books Shared Reading: 2. Use Level A guided reading book. 3. Have students discuss pictures while you encourage and model saying complete sentences. 4. Students read book chorally while pointing to the words with a pointer.Alphabet Book Letters & Names Working with Working with Interactive Sounds Books Writing
  11. 11. Interactive Writing 1. Negotiate a simple sentence. 2. Distribute marker to each student. 3. Use a name chart and letter chart to teach sound- letter links. 4. Students should say each word slowly and isolate beginning sounds or other dominant sounds, reread the sentence while the teacher or student points to each word, learn to use a letter chart to make links and get help with letter formation. Alphabet Book Letters & Names Working with Working with Interactive Sounds Books Writing

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