Motivate, motivation, motivating, employee, employees, engagement, engaging, communication, communicating, intrinsic, extr...
Motivate, motivation, motivating, employee, employees, engagement, engaging, communication, communicating, intrinsic, extr...
Motivate, motivation, motivating, employee, employees, engagement, engaging, communication, communicating, intrinsic, extr...
Motivate, motivation, motivating, employee, employees, engagement, engaging, communication, communicating, intrinsic, extr...
So what?
I don’t see what all the fuss is about
motivation.
My people show up to work and get
a bonus when they work well....
Well, you may be one of the few
doing a great job.
The statistics are not pretty.
All the big HR consultancies
regularly measure engagement
(their word for motivation).
Here’s whatTowers Watson found:
65%
35%
% of employees
"highly engaged"
32,000 respondants
Global Workforce Study, 2012
% ...
and here are Gallup’s findings:
47,000 respondants
The State of the Global Workplace , 2010
% of employees
"highly engaged...
Who cares if my people are “highly
engaged” or not, so long as they
show up and do a decent job?
You should.
Take a look at the difference in
performance between companies
with highly engaged workforces
and those withou...
Here is what AON Hewitt found in terms
of total shareholder return*:
0%
-10%
-30%
-20%
10%
20%
-28%
22%
High engagement
(t...
Productivity
Profitability
Quality
Absenteeism
Here’s what Gallup found in terms of
the impact of superior engagement:
Met...
Gallup again: Financial Impact
The State of the Global Workplace, 2010
Earnings per share (EPS)
of the top 10% for engagem...
Engagement
=
Motivation
=
Performance
?
That might be a step too far…
HOWEVER
Are you going to bet against it?
If motivation = discretionary effort,
don’t you wan...
I thought this
was supposed to
be about cyclists?
OK.
So what do the
cyclists have to
tell us?
The research:
604 replies
45 000 words
91% M, 9% F
Average age 43
6500 km/4000 miles p.a.
These people are passionate!
Let’s do the math…
6,500 kms (4000 miles) per year
=
450 kms (330 miles) per month
In reality, weather conditions etc.
mean an average of
1000 kms (625 miles)
per month through the summer
Or,
20 hours
per week
Photo: Karin Schermbrucker
We are not talking about riding to the cornershop!
Photo: Marvin Faure
People come from all over the world to test
themselves on the mythical cols of theTour de
France
Col de la Madeleine – 199...
"I rode from Grenoble to Cluses,
alone, going over the cols du
Glandon, de la Madeleine and des
Saisies : 240 kms of high ...
?
Where does this extraordinary
motivation come from?
There is no one
single reason to
ride a bike, but
many different
reasons.
Photo: Karin Schermbrucker
From a list of 30 possible
motivations, here are the top 6
#1
I just love
riding my bike
94%
Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
#2
In order to stay
physically fit, for my
health, I feel really
good afterwards
93%
Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation ...
#3
A personal challenge,
to push myself to the
limit, to prove
something to myself
90%
Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivatio...
#4
Time out for myself,
away from day-to-
day stress
80%
Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
#5
Camaraderie
66%
Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
Photo: DSO
#6
I am highly
competitive and
love the racing
57%
Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
Let’s take a look at the list all
together.
What strikes you about this list?
I just love riding my bike
In order to stay physically fit, for my health, I feel really
good afterwards
A personal challe...
What is the source of these various
motivations,
internal or external?
I just love riding my bike
In order to stay physically fit, for my health,
I feel really good afterwards
A personal challe...
You mean they
put themselves
through all this
punishment for
their own,
internal reasons?
Photo: Karin Schermbrucker
Yes sir.
The racing is secondary:
all but 2 or 3 have no
chance of winning.
Photo: Karin Schermbrucker
They do it for sheer fun and pleasure,
because they want to stay fit and healthy, for
the challenge of pushing their limit...
OK. I still don’t get what this has to
do with motivation at work.
We’re getting there.We also asked
the cyclists:
"What lessons can you draw from
cycling for your professional life?"
“Determination ,
commitment,
pushing yourself to
the limit, finding
new challenges”
“If you are determined, you can
go way...
OK.
So now we’ve established these guys
are super motivated to go cycling, and
they have demonstrated some useful
skills –...
49.5%
Are you kidding?
Half these guys are super-motivated
cyclists, but as soon as they get to
work their motivation disappears?
YES!
WHY?
To answer that, let me tell you a
short story…
Far away and long ago, somewhere
in the heart of Europe, a young lad
wandered around a building site in
the center of the ...
The first mason said:
"I’m dressing this
piece of stone. It’s my
job."
Photo: Trevor Newman
The second mason said:
"I’m the best stone
mason here. Look how
much work I have done."
He pointed to a large pile
of dres...
The third mason said:
"I am building a
cathedral"
His eyes sparkling, he
pointed in the air to
where the great building
wo...
Very nice.
Can you frame that for me so I can
see how to use it?
Yes.
This, according to our cyclists, is what was missing
for them to be as motivated at work as they are on
their bikes:
...
These are the same three pillars of intrinsic
motivation identified by Daniel Pink in the NY
Times bestseller “Drive”:
1. ...
According to Pink:
“The science shows that the secret to high
performance […] (is) our deep-seated desire to direct
our ow...
In many companies, the principle motivational tool
is a bonus tied to the achievement of individual
objectives.
 This not...
So what do you suggest I do?
Creating the conditions where people can
be highly motivated at work involves five
considerations:
First,
1. Hire the righ...
Then,
3. Give them space (autonomy)
Don’t micro-manage!
4. Help them become experts
Focus, time, training
5. Ensure they f...
The only thing left to do:
Hire some cyclists and get to work!
Photo: DSO
Motivate, motivation, motivating, employee, employees, engagement, engaging, communication, communicating, intrinsic, extr...
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What can cyclists teach you about how to motivate your people?

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The motivation of amateur cyclists is extraordinary. What can business learn from cyclists to better motivate the workforce? A new study by Marvin Faure confirms the research summarised by Dan Pink in "Drive": the keys to long-lating motivation are Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose.

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What can cyclists teach you about how to motivate your people?

  1. 1. Motivate, motivation, motivating, employee, employees, engagement, engaging, communication, communicating, intrinsic, extrinsic, purpose, sense, mastery, autonomy, carrot, stick, punishment, reward, Pink, Dan, work, workplace, workforce, worker, workers, business, behaviour, behavior, human resources, leadership, leading, leader, management, managing, manager, supervisor, supervising CYCLISTS What can MOTIVATE YOUR PEOPLE? teach you about how to
  2. 2. Motivate, motivation, motivating, employee, employees, engagement, engaging, communication, communicating, intrinsic, extrinsic, purpose, sense, mastery, autonomy, carrot, stick, punishment, reward, Pink, Dan, work, workplace, workforce, worker, workers, business, behaviour, behavior, human resources, leadership, leading, leader, management, managing, manager, supervisor, supervising Strange question! What do these people know about business?
  3. 3. Motivate, motivation, motivating, employee, employees, engagement, engaging, communication, communicating, intrinsic, extrinsic, purpose, sense, mastery, autonomy, carrot, stick, punishment, reward, Pink, Dan, work, workplace, workforce, worker, workers, business, behaviour, behavior, human resources, leadership, leading, leader, management, managing, manager, supervisor, supervising 1. They are probably in work. The majority are middle-aged men. They come from all works of life and include CEO’s as well as hourly workers.
  4. 4. Motivate, motivation, motivating, employee, employees, engagement, engaging, communication, communicating, intrinsic, extrinsic, purpose, sense, mastery, autonomy, carrot, stick, punishment, reward, Pink, Dan, work, workplace, workforce, worker, workers, business, behaviour, behavior, human resources, leadership, leading, leader, management, managing, manager, supervisor, supervising 2. They know a lot about motivation. Cycling is one of the toughest sports there is. You don’t race up mountains if you don’t want to do it. Photo: Karin Schermbrucker
  5. 5. So what? I don’t see what all the fuss is about motivation. My people show up to work and get a bonus when they work well. What’s the problem?
  6. 6. Well, you may be one of the few doing a great job. The statistics are not pretty.
  7. 7. All the big HR consultancies regularly measure engagement (their word for motivation).
  8. 8. Here’s whatTowers Watson found: 65% 35% % of employees "highly engaged" 32,000 respondants Global Workforce Study, 2012 % of employees "unsupported", "detached", or "disengaged"
  9. 9. and here are Gallup’s findings: 47,000 respondants The State of the Global Workplace , 2010 % of employees "highly engaged" 89% 11% % of employees "not engaged" or "actively disengaged"
  10. 10. Who cares if my people are “highly engaged” or not, so long as they show up and do a decent job?
  11. 11. You should. Take a look at the difference in performance between companies with highly engaged workforces and those without.
  12. 12. Here is what AON Hewitt found in terms of total shareholder return*: 0% -10% -30% -20% 10% 20% -28% 22% High engagement (top quartile) Low engagement (bottom quartile) *expressed in % with respect to the average (2900 organizations) Trends in Global Employee Engagement,2011
  13. 13. Productivity Profitability Quality Absenteeism Here’s what Gallup found in terms of the impact of superior engagement: Meta-analysis (199 studies) The State of the Global Workplace, 2010 When engagement increases:
  14. 14. Gallup again: Financial Impact The State of the Global Workplace, 2010 Earnings per share (EPS) of the top 10% for engagement: > 4 x competition EPS
  15. 15. Engagement = Motivation = Performance ?
  16. 16. That might be a step too far… HOWEVER Are you going to bet against it? If motivation = discretionary effort, don’t you want to get as much of this as you can?
  17. 17. I thought this was supposed to be about cyclists?
  18. 18. OK. So what do the cyclists have to tell us?
  19. 19. The research: 604 replies 45 000 words 91% M, 9% F Average age 43 6500 km/4000 miles p.a.
  20. 20. These people are passionate! Let’s do the math… 6,500 kms (4000 miles) per year = 450 kms (330 miles) per month
  21. 21. In reality, weather conditions etc. mean an average of 1000 kms (625 miles) per month through the summer
  22. 22. Or, 20 hours per week Photo: Karin Schermbrucker
  23. 23. We are not talking about riding to the cornershop! Photo: Marvin Faure
  24. 24. People come from all over the world to test themselves on the mythical cols of theTour de France Col de la Madeleine – 1993 m (6538 ft) www.climbbybike.com
  25. 25. "I rode from Grenoble to Cluses, alone, going over the cols du Glandon, de la Madeleine and des Saisies : 240 kms of high mountain passes.The next day I went up to the Flaine ski-station then the following day I returned to Grenoble by the same route : a total of 540 kms, 28h on the bike, in 3 days." - A participant
  26. 26. ? Where does this extraordinary motivation come from?
  27. 27. There is no one single reason to ride a bike, but many different reasons. Photo: Karin Schermbrucker
  28. 28. From a list of 30 possible motivations, here are the top 6
  29. 29. #1 I just love riding my bike 94% Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
  30. 30. #2 In order to stay physically fit, for my health, I feel really good afterwards 93% Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
  31. 31. #3 A personal challenge, to push myself to the limit, to prove something to myself 90% Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
  32. 32. #4 Time out for myself, away from day-to- day stress 80% Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
  33. 33. #5 Camaraderie 66% Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011)) Photo: DSO
  34. 34. #6 I am highly competitive and love the racing 57% Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
  35. 35. Let’s take a look at the list all together. What strikes you about this list?
  36. 36. I just love riding my bike In order to stay physically fit, for my health, I feel really good afterwards A personal challenge, to push myself to the limit, to prove something to myself Time out for myself, away from day-to-day stress Camaraderie I am highly competitive and love the racing Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
  37. 37. What is the source of these various motivations, internal or external?
  38. 38. I just love riding my bike In order to stay physically fit, for my health, I feel really good afterwards A personal challenge, to push myself to the limit, to prove something to myself Time out for myself, away from day-to-day stress Camaraderie I am highly competitive and love the racing Internal motivations External motivation Source: Marvin Faure (The Motivation of Amateur Cyclists (2011))
  39. 39. You mean they put themselves through all this punishment for their own, internal reasons? Photo: Karin Schermbrucker
  40. 40. Yes sir. The racing is secondary: all but 2 or 3 have no chance of winning. Photo: Karin Schermbrucker
  41. 41. They do it for sheer fun and pleasure, because they want to stay fit and healthy, for the challenge of pushing their limits, to take time out and to be with friends. Photo: Matthew Alexander
  42. 42. OK. I still don’t get what this has to do with motivation at work.
  43. 43. We’re getting there.We also asked the cyclists: "What lessons can you draw from cycling for your professional life?"
  44. 44. “Determination , commitment, pushing yourself to the limit, finding new challenges” “If you are determined, you can go way beyond what you think your current boundaries are” “If you don't believe you can do it, you can't.Yet if you do, then anything is possible.” “I can achieve anything I desire if I am willing to dedicate the time and effort.” “Never give up!” Photo: Matthew Alexander
  45. 45. OK. So now we’ve established these guys are super motivated to go cycling, and they have demonstrated some useful skills – tenacity, determination, perseverance… So how many of them are actually motivated at work?
  46. 46. 49.5%
  47. 47. Are you kidding? Half these guys are super-motivated cyclists, but as soon as they get to work their motivation disappears?
  48. 48. YES!
  49. 49. WHY?
  50. 50. To answer that, let me tell you a short story…
  51. 51. Far away and long ago, somewhere in the heart of Europe, a young lad wandered around a building site in the center of the town. He saw three men that were working with stone and went to ask them what they were doing.
  52. 52. The first mason said: "I’m dressing this piece of stone. It’s my job." Photo: Trevor Newman
  53. 53. The second mason said: "I’m the best stone mason here. Look how much work I have done." He pointed to a large pile of dressed stone. Photo: Steven J. Lilley
  54. 54. The third mason said: "I am building a cathedral" His eyes sparkling, he pointed in the air to where the great building would stand, decades in the future. Photo: Marvin Faure
  55. 55. Very nice. Can you frame that for me so I can see how to use it?
  56. 56. Yes. This, according to our cyclists, is what was missing for them to be as motivated at work as they are on their bikes: Sufficient autonomy 54% The possibility to learn and develop 57% A sense of meaning, a higher purpose 60% Source: Marvin Faure (Enquête sur la motivation des cyclistes amateurs)
  57. 57. These are the same three pillars of intrinsic motivation identified by Daniel Pink in the NY Times bestseller “Drive”: 1. AUTONOMY Sufficient autonomy 2. MASTERY The possibility to learn and develop 3. PURPOSE A sense of meaning, a higher purpose Source: Pink, D.H. (2011) DRIVE –The SurprisingTruth AboutWhat Motivates Us
  58. 58. According to Pink: “The science shows that the secret to high performance […] (is) our deep-seated desire to direct our own lives, to extend and expand our abilities, and to live a life of purpose” Source: Pink, D.H. (2011) DRIVE –The SurprisingTruth AboutWhat Motivates Us
  59. 59. In many companies, the principle motivational tool is a bonus tied to the achievement of individual objectives.  This not only misses the point in terms of intrinsic motivation, it is often counter-productive. This surprising statement is underpinned by numerous scientific studies, including our cyclists. Source: Pink, D.H. (2011) DRIVE –The SurprisingTruth AboutWhat Motivates Us
  60. 60. So what do you suggest I do?
  61. 61. Creating the conditions where people can be highly motivated at work involves five considerations: First, 1. Hire the right people 2. Pay them well Source: Pink, D.H. (2011) DRIVE –The SurprisingTruth AboutWhat Motivates Us
  62. 62. Then, 3. Give them space (autonomy) Don’t micro-manage! 4. Help them become experts Focus, time, training 5. Ensure they find a higher purpose There must be a meaning beyond materialism Source: Pink, D.H. (2011) DRIVE –The SurprisingTruth AboutWhat Motivates Us
  63. 63. The only thing left to do: Hire some cyclists and get to work! Photo: DSO
  64. 64. Motivate, motivation, motivating, employee, employees, engagement, engaging, communication, communicating, intrinsic, extrinsic, purpose, sense, mastery, autonomy, carrot, stick, punishment, reward, Pink, Dan, work, workplace, workforce, worker, workers, business, behaviour, behavior, human resources, leadership, leading, leader, management, managing, manager, supervisor, supervising Chemin du Canal, 5 1260 Nyon Switzerland T. +41 (0)78 682 69 26 marvin.faure@mindstore.ch www.mindstore.ch Photo credits (unless otherwise stated): TheAlpine Challenge 2011 by HotChillee, photography by Matt Alexander & Karin Schermbruker

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