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ANGER MANAGEMENT

MARUSCHKA JOUBERT
Abrose Biere said:
Learning Objectives:

 By the end of the section learners will be able to:
 How the view explains our differences
 Defi...
What is conflict:
• A battle, contest or
opposing forces existing
between primitive desires
and moral, religious or
ethica...
Anger Management:

 Conflict management is

referred to as the
practice of identifying
and handling conflict
situations i...
Our view tends to inspire our opinion:
Trunk vs. Tail
Just as the picture
illustrates, every
individuals view is
determined by
their
circumstances and
unique pos...
Take a step
back…

 For a true view of anything

around you, you need to take a
step back and inspect it from
every possi...
If I am mad, am I bad…
 Becoming angry does not necessarily make you a bad

person. Every individual get angry at some po...
Why do we get angry:
 “ We are predisposed to become angry when we

appraise an event or a person as a threat to one of
o...
Anger Management:
 Embarrassment

 Excitement

 Identify a range of

feelings including
anger:

 Disappointment
 Jeal...
Identifying different triggers:
 Previous recorded scenes from events has set your

mood, anything after that experience ...
Can anger be good?
 Anger is almost always viewed as a negative,

although it can be used in a positive manner:
 Anger p...
Have a break, have a KitKat:
 Anger feels very uncomfortable, but there are ways to

release these feelings so they do no...
When you know, you know..
 Our bodies send us signals, warning us that we are

busy getting angry:
 Clenched fists
 We ...
Breathe..
TIME OUT!!

Ways to ease feelings of anger:
 Engage in some sort of physical










activity. Take yo...
Relaxation:
 Progressive relaxation:
 Take 3 very deep breaths and imagine the tension

leaving your body as you exhale....
#Anger Management 101
 1) Ask yourself if the reason for your anger will have any importance

in your life, in ten years ...
#Continue..
 5) Try counting to ten before saying or doing anything. This

approach may not deal with the anger directly,...
Take it slow..

• Lower the volume of your voice
• Slow the rate of speaking
• Breath from the stomach
• Soften the face m...
Results of Conflict:
I WIN

YOU WIN

YOU LOSE

I LOSE
Anger:
 “ For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of

happiness.” –Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)

 “When...
How to deal with Conflict:
*Assure privacy
*Listen actively

*Give your positive
feedback
*Agree on an action
plan

*Encou...
What is your anger style:

1) Acting out

2) Dumping

3) Burying
Anger style:
 Acting out:
 Easiest to recognize
 You lash out at a person
 You are mad and you express that physically...
Anger Style:
 Dumping (Displaced anger):
 You shift your feelings to someone you feel it is safe

to be mad at.
 For ex...
Anger Style:
 Burying (Ignoring):
 This style includes holding your anger down inside

yourself because you feel guilty ...
Anger doesn’t just affect the
person you are angry at..
Conclusion:
*KNOW THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ANGER
AND AGGRESSION.
*ANGER IS AN EMOTION. IT IS OKAY TO BE
ANGRY.
*AGGRESSION I...
Reference List:










Unknown. (Unknown). Anger Management. [Online], Available:
http://www.slideshare.net/mobile...
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Anger Management

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Anger Management

  1. 1. ANGER MANAGEMENT MARUSCHKA JOUBERT
  2. 2. Abrose Biere said:
  3. 3. Learning Objectives:  By the end of the section learners will be able to:  How the view explains our differences  Define conflict  Discuss the positive and negative aspects of conflict  Explain causes of conflict  Explain different types and styles of conflict management
  4. 4. What is conflict: • A battle, contest or opposing forces existing between primitive desires and moral, religious or ethical ideas (Webster’s Dictionary) • A state of incompatibility of ideas between two or more parties or individuals.
  5. 5. Anger Management:  Conflict management is referred to as the practice of identifying and handling conflict situations in a sensible, fair and efficient manner.
  6. 6. Our view tends to inspire our opinion:
  7. 7. Trunk vs. Tail Just as the picture illustrates, every individuals view is determined by their circumstances and unique position of questioning. Our view is defined by what we see in front of us at that very moment.
  8. 8. Take a step back…  For a true view of anything around you, you need to take a step back and inspect it from every possible angle.  Explore different perspectives for richer solutions.  Expand your view to grow your wisdom.
  9. 9. If I am mad, am I bad…  Becoming angry does not necessarily make you a bad person. Every individual get angry at some point. However, how a person choose to deal with and express these feelings is where the problem is created.  No one can be made angry. The principal is the same as the fact that no one can make you happy, these emotions and feelings are just outlets for other emotions that we aren’t dealing with in an appropriate manner.
  10. 10. Why do we get angry:  “ We are predisposed to become angry when we appraise an event or a person as a threat to one of our basic needs such as food and shelter, or more mature needs such as identity, recognition, achievement, and social affiliation.”
  11. 11. Anger Management:  Embarrassment  Excitement  Identify a range of feelings including anger:  Disappointment  Jealousy  Fear  Helpless  Sadness  Left-out
  12. 12. Identifying different triggers:  Previous recorded scenes from events has set your mood, anything after that experience can trigger your response to react in anger.  Realizing that there has been previous instances that act as precursors to anger can decrease the impact of certain triggers.  Knowing what these specific triggers are can help you respond in an appropriate manner, rather than to lash out at people.
  13. 13. Can anger be good?  Anger is almost always viewed as a negative, although it can be used in a positive manner:  Anger provides cues that warns individuals against possible problems or harm.  Anger provides us with energy and helps motivate a cause or action.  Anger can encourage the expression of feelings.
  14. 14. Have a break, have a KitKat:  Anger feels very uncomfortable, but there are ways to release these feelings so they do not turn into destructive reactions. Taking some time before reacting to be constructive can increase positive feelings and emotions. Ignore aggression, take a break before reacting to the situation and form a plan of action while deciding how to handle your anger.
  15. 15. When you know, you know..  Our bodies send us signals, warning us that we are busy getting angry:  Clenched fists  We begin to speak louder  Red face  Upset stomach  Racing and pounding heartbeat  Sweat
  16. 16. Breathe.. TIME OUT!! Ways to ease feelings of anger:  Engage in some sort of physical        activity. Take your dog for a walk. Read a book. Watch television. Call a friend. Write in a journal. Complete chores. Work in the garden. What ideas can you think of?
  17. 17. Relaxation:  Progressive relaxation:  Take 3 very deep breaths and imagine the tension leaving your body as you exhale.  Clench your fists and hold for up to 10 seconds.  Tighten you biceps and release.  You can envision yourself in a setting you find peaceful. Envision the scene in great detail and do not limit yourself to reality.
  18. 18. #Anger Management 101  1) Ask yourself if the reason for your anger will have any importance in your life, in ten years from now. This will give you some perspective.  2) Ask yourself what the worst consequence of the object of my anger will be. In most cases you’ll find that it is not that bad.  3) Imagine yourself do the same thing. Come on, admit that you have sometimes cut in front of another person. Do you get angry at yourself?  4) Ask yourself: “Did that person do this on purpose?” In most cases, you will see that they were just careless or in a rush.
  19. 19. #Continue..  5) Try counting to ten before saying or doing anything. This approach may not deal with the anger directly, but it can minimize the damage you will do while angry.  6) Try different approaches of counting to ten. For example: Count to ten with a deep slow breathe in between each number.  7) Force yourself to think of something funny or something pleasant.  Visualize a relaxing experience. Close your eyes, and travel there in your mind.
  20. 20. Take it slow.. • Lower the volume of your voice • Slow the rate of speaking • Breath from the stomach • Soften the face muscle • Delay before responding • Listening is a key
  21. 21. Results of Conflict: I WIN YOU WIN YOU LOSE I LOSE
  22. 22. Anger:  “ For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of happiness.” –Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)  “When anger rises, think of the consequences” – Confucius (551-479 BC)
  23. 23. How to deal with Conflict: *Assure privacy *Listen actively *Give your positive feedback *Agree on an action plan *Encourage feedback *Identify alternate solutions *Maintain equity *Focus on issue, not on personality *Avoid blame *Identify key theme
  24. 24. What is your anger style: 1) Acting out 2) Dumping 3) Burying
  25. 25. Anger style:  Acting out:  Easiest to recognize  You lash out at a person  You are mad and you express that physically or verbally.  Consequences:  You get in trouble  Problem does not get solved.
  26. 26. Anger Style:  Dumping (Displaced anger):  You shift your feelings to someone you feel it is safe to be mad at.  For example: Dad gets mad at his boss, comes home and yells at mom, who yells at the kids, who kicks the dog!!  Consequences:  You hurt innocent people  The problem doesn’t get solved.
  27. 27. Anger Style:  Burying (Ignoring):  This style includes holding your anger down inside yourself because you feel guilty about having them.  Denying your anger isn’t dealing with it.  These buried feelings reveals themselves in other ways: headaches, anxious, depressed.  Consequences:  You hurt yourself  You might other when you eventually explode  The problem is still not solved.
  28. 28. Anger doesn’t just affect the person you are angry at..
  29. 29. Conclusion: *KNOW THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ANGER AND AGGRESSION. *ANGER IS AN EMOTION. IT IS OKAY TO BE ANGRY. *AGGRESSION IS ACTING OUT INAPPROPRIATELY AND IT IS NOT OKAY. LEARN TO CHECK YOU AGGRESSION AND EXPRESS YOUR ANGER APPROPRIATELY.
  30. 30. Reference List:      Unknown. (Unknown). Anger Management. [Online], Available: http://www.slideshare.net/mobile/icslide/anger-management-10653767.co.za (Accessed 3 March 2014) MahetaShivang. (Unknown). Anger Management. [Online], Available: http://www.slideshare.net/mobile/MahetaShivang/angermanagement-22892889 (Accesses 2 March 2014) EIGhonemy, S. (Unknown). Anger Management Skills. [Online], Available: http://www.slideshare.net/mobile/SoheirELghonemy/anger-management-skills-2nd (Accessed 3 March) Rife. H & Kapes, R. (2004). Anger Management. [Online], Available: http://www.slideshare.net/mobile/MahetaShivang/angermanagement-22892889 (Accessed 2 March 2014) Unknown. (Unknown). Anger Management. [Online], Available: http://www.slideshare.net/mobile/malsmith/angermanagement1 (Accessed 3 March 2014)

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