Communities for businesses based on Free

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This lecture gives a brief overview of some community-building concepts.

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  • Groundswell p43
  • DtT p7
  • Communities for businesses based on Free

    1. 1. (Stanford BUS-21) Martin Westhead Mastering Marketing Communities How to make money by giving things away
    2. 2. Overview  Motivation  What is a community?  Why do people participate in community?
    3. 3. Communities: Relevance to Free Businesses? 1. Free typically used to create mindshare - Communities amplify mindshare - Drives higher engagement/attention 2. Free products need scalable costs - Community can provide scalable support and marketing 3. All businesses need to hear from customers - Online community is a great way to do this at scale
    4. 4. WHAT IS A COMMUNITY
    5. 5. What do we mean by community?  94 sociological definitions of community by 1950  Derivation - communité - old French - communitas (cum, "with/together" + munus, "gift")  Community is NOT defined by technology - Blogs, emails lists, listserv,  Social Network is NOT (necessarily) a community - Facebook friends not working together - Weak second degree connections Group of people interacting over common interests, goals or passions (Who get to know each other better over time)
    6. 6. Social Network vs. Community Social Network Community  Structured around 1-1 relationships  Weak secondary relationships  Good for sharing activities  Structured around shared purpose  Strong, predictable secondary relationships  Good for activities requiring sharing and cooperation
    7. 7. Types of Online Community Creating Knowledge / Expert Support Political/Activist Activity/Interest Customer Fan Gaming Education/Training Marketing
    8. 8. WHY DO PEOPLE PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY?
    9. 9. Creators Critics Collectors Joiners Spectators Inactives Social Technographics Ladder – Li and BernhoffGroundswell
    10. 10. Creators  18% online adult population  Publish a blog  Publish Web Page  Upload video/audio they created  Write articles or stories and post them
    11. 11. Critics  25% online adult population  Post ratings/reviews of products/services  Comment on someone else’s blog  Contribute to online forums  Contribute to/edit articles on a Wiki
    12. 12. Collectors  12% US online adult population  Use RSS feeds  Add tags to Web pages or photos  “Vote” for Web sites online using Digg, Redit, Stumbleupon etc.
    13. 13. Joiners  25% US online adult population  Maintain a profile on a social networking site  Visit social networking sites
    14. 14. Spectators  48% US online adults  Read blogs  Watch videos of others  Listen to podcasts  Read online forums  Read customer ratings/reviews
    15. 15. Inactives  44 % US online adults  Do none of these activities
    16. 16. RIBS  Remuneration –return on their investment  Influence – having a voice in the community  Belonging – developing a collective identity  Significance – community has impact “Design to Thrive” - Tharon Howard
    17. 17. Remuneration?  It’s not about money - Lawrence Lessig, Remix – “Money in a sharing economy is not just inappropriate it is poisonous”  It’s about the experience - A nice restaurant about more than food - Google clean useful UI experience  It’s about Sociability – opportunities to connect  Clear benefit to contributing to a community  Remuneration is what drives Engagement  E.g. Facebookand CNN Obama inauguration
    18. 18. Influence  The need to feel control  Ability to shape our environment  Historical examples - Migration of many groups to the USA - Protestants leaving the catholic church  Need for influence in the workplace  In an online community - Am I being heard? - Are my contributions valued? - Do I have a say in how things are run?
    19. 19. Needs on the Ladder Creators • Shape the thoughts of community • Creations to be read critically but fairly • Need to know they’re being read • Input on policies and governance Critics • Comments are being viewed • Consensus builders – lining up values • Input on policies and governance
    20. 20. Needs on the Ladder Inactives • Needs are not met Collectors • Collections are valued by community • Correlation of taxonomy Joiners • Profile is being viewed • Contribution to the membership count Spectators •Acknowledgements of their presence
    21. 21. Belonging  Stories  Rituals and Events  Symbols and Codes - Red Hat Society - “…verve, humor and elan…” - Military Uniform
    22. 22. Significance  Is my community important?  Well recognized  Established as the “Go-to” place for users needs  Valued by people user respects  Populated by people who are serious and passionate  Distinguished as a reputable brand It is about building gravitas, brand and reputation You are here
    23. 23. Summary  Motivation  What is a community?  Why do people participate in community?

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