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Designing products against customer jobs

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How do you create successful products? By asking customers what they want? By matching market trends? Or rather by understanding the jobs that users try to get done? Believing it’s the latter, Hannes Jentsch and I gave a talk at Berlin ProductTank in July 2015 discussing how to design products against customer jobs.

In the talk we shared our experience from applying Jobs-to-be-Done tools in agile environments at Nokia’s HERE business for 2 years. We described JTBD as a framework, mind as well as set of tools and methods. Furthermore, we mapped and presented key JTBD tools against the lean product development process and discussed them in detail.

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Designing products against customer jobs

  1. 1. Designing products against customer jobs ProductTank Berlin #7: Lean UX July 22, 2015 • Hannes Jentsch & Martin Jordan
  2. 2. BACKG RO UND Product, Innovation, Design H A N N E S J E N T S C H , Design & Innovation Consultant, Freelance @Kaffeertrinken M A R T I N J O R DA N , Experience design, HERE/Nokia @Martin_Jordan
  3. 3. POINT O F VIEW Jobs-to-be-Done Framework in Context of Lean Approach Applied JTBD tools in lean environments for past 2 years at Nokia’s HERE JTBD tools help to formulate a minimal viable product that fits the customers’ jobs
  4. 4. Who of you has used the Value Proposition Canvas? Who of you has investigated customers jobs? QUESTION Your JTBD experience
  5. 5. “People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole! ” QUOTE — T H E O D O R E L E V I T T, American Economist Source: http://hbr.org/web/special-collections/insight/marketing-that-works/marketing-malpractice-the-cause-and-cure
  6. 6. FOCUS Source: Clement Génin, Jobs-to-be-done – A goal-driven solution framework: http://www.slideshare.net/ClementGenin/jobstobedone The product analysis, design and sale should focus on: developing the product asking what users want matching market trends understanding the jobs that users try to get done
  7. 7. J OB Orientate in an unfamiliar area
  8. 8. JOB Communicate with a friend
  9. 9. JOB Document my life
  10. 10. “Jobs-to-be-done describe the tasks that a product or service is carrying out. People don’t just buy products or just want to use a certain service. They ‘hire’ them to do a job. ” QUOTE — C L AY C H R I S T E N S E N , Professor for Management Source: http://www.christenseninstitute.org/
  11. 11. BELIEF Job-to-be-Done is a … Framework for developing & communicating product and services Mindset for understanding human behaviour, and why people switch from one offering to another Set of tools and methods for almost every part of the product development process
  12. 12. Source: ‘Mastering Lean Product Development: A Practical, Event-Driven Process for Maximizing Speed, Profits, and Quality’ by Ron Mascitelli APPLICATI ON In Lean Product Development
  13. 13. Retrospective interviews Forces Customer Job Definition Customer Job Map Job Stories -----------------------> Consider- ation Set JTBD-based Marketing APPLICATI ON In Lean Product Development
  14. 14. Retrospective interviews are a way to uncover the ‘jobs’ people are trying to get done, the events and forces that lead them to ‘hire’ a specific solution. It’s a qualitative research method, based on an interview around a customer’s timeline leading up to a purchase. Resource: Gertis, H., Bollingmo T. L. (2015): Jobs-to-be-Done Interviews. Berlin, Germany. TOOLS & METHODS Retrospective Interviews First thought Event 1 BUY Event 2 Passive looking Active looking Deciding Consuming
  15. 15. PUSH PULL HABIT ANXIETY FORCES PROMOTING A NEW CHOICE FORCES BLOCKING CHANGE Business as usual New behaviour Resource: Spiek, C., Moesta, B. (2014): The Jobs-to-be-Done Handbook. Seattle, WA: CreateSpace. TOOLS & METHODS Forces
  16. 16. WEAK SIGNAL BETTER PRICE KEEP NUMBER? DIRECT WITHDRAWAL FORCES PROMOTING A NEW CHOICE FORCES BLOCKING CHANGE Business as usual New behaviour Resource: Spiek, C., Moesta, B. (2014): The Jobs-to-be-Done Handbook. Seattle, WA: CreateSpace. TOOLS & METHODS Forces
  17. 17. TOOLS & METHODS Consideration Set Understanding competition in the users’ mind and their different qualities. Entertaining in the evening
  18. 18. TOOLS & METHODS Consideration Set Understanding competition in the users’ mind and their different qualities. Concert Friends Live Social Television Free Streaming Service Choice
  19. 19. TOOLS & METHODS Customer Job Definition So called job statements can be used to describe a job-to-be-done. Key components of a job statement are an action verb, the object of the action, and clarification of the context in which the job is performed. e.g. ‘Clean clothes quickly’ or ‘Manage personal finances at home’ Jobs Gains Pains Resources: Silverstein, D., Samuel, P. (2012): The Innovator's Toolkit. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Osterwalder, A., Pigneur, Y. , Bernarda, G., Smith, A. (2014): Value Proposition Design: How to Create Products and Services Customers Want. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
  20. 20. Emotional / personal jobs Functional jobs Social jobs Kinds of jobs Resource: Silverstein, D., Samuel, P. (2012): The Innovator's Toolkit. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
  21. 21. Retrospective interviews Forces Customer Job Definition Job Stories -----------------------> Consider- ation Set JTBD-based Marketing APPLICATI ON In Lean Product Development Customer Job Map
  22. 22. Phase 1 Job-to-be-Done: Getting to work on time Hired solution: Car sharing service – Previously undiscovered touchpoint Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4 Phase 5 Phase 6 Phase 7 Phase 5 CONTEXT Woke up too late that morning TOUCHPOINT Urban navigation app WANTED OUTCOME Discovering the best option to get to work fast UNWANTED OUTCOME Wasting more time with searching for options FUNCTIONAL JOB Finding the fastest way to get to work EMOTIONAL JOB Regaining control of the situation SOCIAL JOB Letting my colleagues know when I will arrive at work Resource: Jentsch, H., Jordan, M. (2015): Understanding the jobs your service is hired for – Combining service design methods with the Job-to-be-Done framework. Touchpoint 7/2, Cologne, Germany TOOLS & METHODS Customer Job Map
  23. 23. For describing context, brief for idea, validating designs, measuring success When I want to So I can Situation Need Goal Resource: Klement, A. (2013): Replacing The User Story With The Job Story. Retrieved June 20 from https://medium.com/the-job-to-be-done/replacing-the-user-story-with-the-job-story-af7cdee10c27. TOOLS & METHODS Job Stories
  24. 24. When I am on my island round trip where I travel with a lot of stuff in a small backpack and only unreliable connection to the Internet I want to easily pick photos I took that day and sync them whenever connected to a WiFi So I can I can share my photos with friends and family. TOOLS & METHODS Job Stories
  25. 25. TOOLS & METHODS JTBD-based Marketing Taking not about your product features, but name the customers’ problems – so they know your offering is a solution worth hiring.
  26. 26. TOOLS & METHODS JTBD-based Marketing Resources: Joanna Wiebe, http://www.slideshare.net/copyhackers
  27. 27. VALUE Benefits for all team members Product owners and managers know what kind of products they are developing and who they are competing with. Developers know the context of the product and its sprints, can prioritise better and see purpose. Designers know the context and desired outcomes of the user and can design against these accordingly. QA engineers know the essential use and test cases, can prioritise better.
  28. 28. NEX T Where to start Conduct retrospective interviews with customers or users who used your or your competitors’ offering. Understand the jobs they tried to get done. And start tweaking your product accordingly.
  29. 29. RECOMMENDATIONS Address progress- blocking forces, foster forces that promote progress Embrace JTBD language across silos to reduce friction & improve knowledge flow Understand your customers’ desired outcomes Don’t talk about features, but how your offering helps getting jobs done
  30. 30. NEX T Berlin JTBD Meetup Check meetup.com for the upcoming event: http://www.meetup.com/berlin-jobs-to-be-done-meetup/

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