Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Apps as Machines — at Hochschule Darmstadt

987 views

Published on

What if your favourite apps turned into little machines? What makes physical objects more emotionally engaging than apps? How do we connect to them through our natural senses and cognitive abilities?

Together with 20 students we broke down some of our favourite apps to their elementals and re-imagined them as physical machines. We examined aspects of experience which can bring us closer to the services we use every day.

How? With a few short hands-on exercises, we explored the jobs-to-be-done behind popular apps. Quick prototypes and scenarios of how these might exist as machines helped us to uncover what a new design field of the future looks like.

Taught by Hannes Jentsch and Martin Jordan at Hochschule Darmstadt, Germany in May 2016.

Published in: Devices & Hardware
  • Comparing VigRX Plus to ED Prescription Drugs ➤➤ http://t.cn/Ai88iYkP
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Unique Acne System, How to get lasting acne freedom clear skin e-book reveals all ■■■ https://bit.ly/2SaU9sk
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Have you ever heard of taking paid surveys on the internet before? We have one right now that pays $50, and takes less than 10 minutes! If you want to take it, here is your personal link ●●● https://tinyurl.com/make2793amonth
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Apps as Machines — at Hochschule Darmstadt

  1. 1. — Scott A. Nelson & Paul Metaxatos / HBR https://hbr.org/2016/04/the-internet-of-things-needs-design-not-just-technology IoT connectivity can enhance a product’s value, but it can never serve as the rationale for the customer purchase. “ ”
  2. 2. Apps as Machines @AppsAsMachines @H_DA Hannes Jentsch Martin Jordan
  3. 3. Hello Who are you? Why are you here?
  4. 4. Background: Product, Innovation, Design Hannes Jentsch Design & Innovation Consultant, Freelance @Kaffeetrinken
  5. 5. Background: Service, Innovation, Design Martin Jordan
 Lead Service Designer, Government Digital Service @Martin_Jordan Cabinet Office Government Digital Service
  6. 6. What happened so far
  7. 7. Conference workshops
  8. 8. University course
  9. 9. Newspaper
  10. 10. Terms & conditions 2 days, 12 hours ½ home work 100% attendance & contribution
  11. 11. Approach connected device projects from a user-need angle Learning goals Leverage human capabilities when designing for IoT Crafting meaningful and relevant new offerings
  12. 12. What is the ‘internet of things’? Question
  13. 13. Definition The Internet of Things (IoT) is the interconnection of uniquely identifiable embedded computing devices within the existing Internet infrastructure. “ ” — Wikipedia, Internet of Things http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_of_Things
  14. 14. Definition It seems to mean everything and nothing. Like, is it RFIDs in airports to track luggage, combine harvesters driven by town-wide WiMAX, or web-connected receipt printers for the home? Too much. “ ” — Matt Webb / @Genmon, BergCloud http://blog.bergcloud.com/2014/04/02/four-types-of-iot/
  15. 15. Which devices come to your mind? Question
  16. 16. Examples FitBit Pebble Apple Watch Wearables Sonos Apple TV Chromecast Media Smartthings Belkin Wemo Philips Hue Home Automation Withings Nest Cloudwash Smart Appliances Source: Bergcloud / ‘Four Types of IoT’ http://blog.bergcloud.com/2014/04/02/four-types-of-iot/
  17. 17. Wearables Connected cars Connected homes Connected cities Industrial internet Transportation Healthcare Oil & gas Source: Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research IoT Landscapes
  18. 18. What do they do for us? Question
  19. 19. Expanding the definition of ‘machine’
  20. 20. As we start to make Apps as Machines, what are the building blocks of rich physical experiences we can draw from? Hypothesis A physical experience offers us
 so many opportunities for cognitive, and thus, emotional engagement.
  21. 21. Hypothesis
  22. 22. Setting their jobs to be done into context Agenda Solving the job by leveraging more human capabilities Pitching your machine Discovering what apps and their services do for us
  23. 23. Uncovering what Dropbox does for us …
  24. 24. Dropbox’s jobs-to-be-done* — Jobs-to-be-done describe the tasks that a product or service is carrying out. People don’t just buy products or just want to use a certain service. They ‘hire’ them to do a job. For example: Car2Go gets you from A to B. The drill hammer helps you to hang a painting on the wall. Pinterest supports you in collecting and remembering things. — @ClayChristensen, http://www.christenseninstitute.org have my documents always with me retrieve my documents wherever I need them secure copies of important documents show photos to my friends & family collaborate with my colleagues store my memories of important moments
  25. 25. Definition — @ClayChristensen, Professor for management http://www.christenseninstitute.org/ Jobs-to-be-done describe the tasks that a product or service is carrying out. People don’t just buy products or just want to use a certain service. They ‘hire’ them to do a job. “ ”
  26. 26. What is the task of wine? Question
  27. 27. Source: Laurence Veale / ‘The jobs wine is hired for’ https://medium.com/@laurenceveale/the-jobs-wine-is-hired-for-272a929ea8be How most wines are organised in wine shops
  28. 28. Source: Laurence Veale / ‘The jobs wine is hired for’ https://medium.com/@laurenceveale/the-jobs-wine-is-hired-for-272a929ea8be Organising the retail space around a specific job: to make dinner a little better
  29. 29. Source: Laurence Veale / ‘The jobs wine is hired for’ https://medium.com/@laurenceveale/the-jobs-wine-is-hired-for-272a929ea8be Organising the retail space for a second job: to look neither cheap nor foolish
  30. 30. Your task Set up your group
  31. 31. Your task 6 jobs each3 apps1 user 2 hours
  32. 32. Interview for Empathy Ask why. Never say “usually” when asking a question. Encourage stories. Look for inconsistencies. Pay attention to nonverbal cues. Don’t be afraid of silence. Don’t suggest answers to your questions. Ask questions neutrally. Don’t ask binary questions. Only ten words to a question. Only ask one question at a time, one person at a time. Make sure you’re prepared to capture. A.school (2010): bootcamp bootleg http://dschool.stanford.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/BootcampBootleg2010v2SLIM.pdf
  33. 33. APPS AS MACHINES — Your first task Investigation YOUR USER: over age of 60 and using a smartphone daily grew up outside of Europe young mother or father under the age of 18, still going to school flying more than 3 times per month small business owner with a physical store handicapped (with impact on everyday life)
  34. 34. NAME OF THE APP: JOBS OF THE APP: Satisfaction: Satisfaction: Satisfaction: Situation: Situation: Situation: Great Great Great Just right/ok Just right/ok Just right/ok Not really satisfying Not really satisfying Not really satisfying
  35. 35. All clear? Ready to go? Check-in
  36. 36. — Theodore Levitt, American economist http://hbr.org/web/special-collections/insight/marketing-that-works/
 marketing-malpractice-the-cause-and-cure People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole! “ ”
  37. 37. Setting their jobs to be done into context Agenda Solving the job by leveraging more human capabilities Pitching your machine Discovering what apps and their services do for us
  38. 38. Who is your user? Which apps is s/he using? What are their ‘jobs’? Tell
  39. 39. Focus The product analysis, design and sale should focus on: developing the product asking what users want matching market trends understanding the jobs that users try to get done Source: Clement Génin, Jobs-to-be-done – A goal-driven solution framework http://www.slideshare.net/ClementGenin/jobstobedone
  40. 40. User Job IoT Solution Point of View
  41. 41. Orientating in unfamiliar area Using mapping service Point of View
  42. 42. Getting to appointment in time Taking a taxi Source: Pexels Point of View
  43. 43. Rewarding for a tough day at work Getting dinner delivered Source: Pexels Point of View
  44. 44. Emotional / personal jobs Functional jobs Social jobs Resource: Silverstein, D., Samuel, P. (2012): The Innovator's Toolkit. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Kinds of jobs
  45. 45. Compact Disc Jobs are solution-agnostic and remain valid over long time Spotify Streaming Vinyl record Private concert iTunes MP3 THEN NOW Job of listening to music
  46. 46. Jobs of the milkshake by Clayton Christensen Jobs of Snickers vs. Milkyway by Bob Moesta Source: http://hbr.org/web/special-collections/insight/marketing-that-works/marketing-malpractice-the-cause-and-cure Origin story
  47. 47. Milkshake
 Job: consume something now that will stave off hunger until noon VS Snickers Banana Bagel Consideration Set
  48. 48. Framework for developing & communicating products and services Set of tools and methods for almost every part
 of the service development process Mindset for understanding human behaviour, and why people switch from one offering to another Perspective Jobs-to-be-Done is …
  49. 49. Setting their jobs to be done into context Agenda Solving the job by leveraging more human capabilities Pitching your machine Discovering what apps and their services do for us
  50. 50. Setting their jobs to be done into context Agenda Solving the job by leveraging more human capabilities Pitching your machine Discovering what apps and their services do for us
  51. 51. View We frame every design problem in a Job, focusing on the triggering event or situation, the motivation and goal, and the intended outcome. “ ” — @AlanKlement http://alanklement.blogspot.de/2013/09/replacing-user-story-with-job-story.html
  52. 52. Rethink The context defines what is needed to perform a job Getting from A to B in the city
  53. 53. Jobs vs solution Local public transport “Get me to my destination during rush hour with a predictable time of arrival.”
  54. 54. Jobs vs solution Taxi & uber “Get me to the airport in the very early morning, but allow me to sleep as long as possible and save me time.”
  55. 55. Jobs vs solution car2go & Drive Now “Get me to my destination during an off-peak time of the day when I have something to carry that’s too uncomfortable for public transport. Or when I want to upgrade myself.”
  56. 56. Jobs vs solution Flinkster & CiteeCar “Get me out of the city with my family over the weekend.”
  57. 57. Jobs vs solution Call a Bike & Next Bike “Get me to work on a beautiful day when there is little time pressure.”
  58. 58. Jobs vs solution eMio “Get me and my partner to the brunch date with friends quickly.”
  59. 59. + + + + + Situation M onday M orning Rain Alarm didn’t ring Usuallygone atthattim e Carin repair Contextualise
  60. 60. When Where Who How What season month weekd ay daytime occasionlocation type category attrib.profile/mode social device motion useract.routine traffic facebook c ollec. weather Routinely used route Routinely visited place First time visit Unknown area Known area … Historical traffic around location Congestion/incidents on route Congestion/incidents around loc. … Visited by friends Visited by me Popular on facebook Liked by friends Liked by me … In popular collection In m yfriendscollection In m ycollection… FreezingCoolMild Warm Hot Night Day Stormy Snowy Rainy Foggy Cloudy Clear Wetseason Dryseason Winter Autumn Summer Spring January February March April May June July AugustSeptemberOctoberNovember December MondayTuesday Wednesday ThursdayFriday Saturday Sunday Morning Noon Afternoon Evening Night Sunrise Sunset … At a planned appointment Appointment scheduled in x hours Leaving In transit Arriving Early in month Late in month (f.ex salary) Commute Travel … Outdoor Indoor Near POI of cat. XNear POI cluster of cat. XMoving towards X Distance to destinationDistance to POI … On streetIn building In/at venueIn park On mountain On water … Airport Departm ent store Hotel Cafe Restaurant ATM Leisure PTstation Sight Mall Parkingspace Junction Highway … Pricerange Openinghours Availableparking … … Commuter CityDweller Traveler Age30-39 Age18-29 Age<18 Male Female … Withanonymouscrowd Withknownpeople Alone … Roamingactive Via3G etc ViaBluetooth ViaWiFi Desktop Tablet Phone … Ascending/descending Trajectory/bearing/direction DrivingWalkingStill … Using app since 1d/1w/1m Calculated a route to/from Reviewed Shared to/byCollected Searched for … Routine follow up action when x Situation Consider
  61. 61. Enhance ContextsPersonas
  62. 62. Amazon Dash
  63. 63. Rephrase Formulate each job into a statement (or job story) When I want to So I can Situation Need Goal
  64. 64. Benefit Describe a real user’s need in context Validate design solutions Communicate the design task
  65. 65. View Often, because people are so focused on the who and how, they totally miss the why. When you start to understand the why, your mind is then open to think of creative and original ways to solve the problem. “ ” — @AlanKlement https://medium.com/the-job-to-be-done/af7cdee10c27
  66. 66. The right machine for … Adam 31, German moving to South Korea
  67. 67. APPS AS MACHINES — The right machine for … JOB-TO-BE-DONE STORY* Adam When (situation) 31, German moving to South Korea have personal documents always at hand
  68. 68. STORY* When (situation) I want to (need) So that (goal) — “Job Stories are great because it makes you think about motivation and context and de-emphasizes adding any particular implementation. Often, because people are so focused on the who and how, they totally miss the why. When you start to understand the why, your mind is then open to think of creative and original ways to solve the problem.” — @AlanKlement, https://medium.com/the-job-to-be-done/af7cdee10c27 I move to another country and need to register there with banks and authorities I can identify myself without having to carry unique originals with me. have easy access to my most important documents
  69. 69. What is your main job?
 What is the situation?
 What are the needs? Write
  70. 70. Your task 30 Minutes2 Stories1 App
  71. 71. How went your job story writing? Tell
  72. 72. Pitfalls & tips Don’t include solutions
 into stories. Don’t formulate stories
 too general. Don’t include more than
 one context and goal. Write it like in the 70s –
 avoid mentioning tech. If you struggle in writing,
 do further research! Think in struggles
 rather than outcomes. Don’t Do
  73. 73. Setting their jobs to be done into context Agenda Solving the job by leveraging more human capabilities Pitching your machine Discovering what apps and their services do for us
  74. 74. Setting their jobs to be done into context Agenda Solving the job by leveraging more human capabilities Pitching your machine Discovering what apps and their services do for us
  75. 75. View Those digital updates have little sympathy for any divisions of time or space we might to impose upon our days. We may find that we are ranking the ‘needs’ of our machines above our own. “ ” — @TomChatfield http://tomchatfield.net/2012/05/09/how-to-thrive-in-the-digital-age/
  76. 76. Cloudwash
  77. 77. Input for your creation
  78. 78. Cheat Sheet
  79. 79. Your task 4 Minutes1 Job Story 1 Question
  80. 80. How might we + user + ? need + insight Ask
  81. 81. user needinsight Ask How might we assist Adam who is moving to South Korea to have his most important personal documents with him so that he can identify himself without needing his unique originals?
  82. 82. Ask user needinsight How might we assist Adam who is moving to South Korea to have his most important personal documents with him so that he can identify himself without needing his unique originals?
  83. 83. Write user + insight + need APPS AS MACHINES How might we assist Adam who is moving to South Korea to have his most important personal documents with him so that he can identify himself without needing his unique originals? — Input for your creation How might we … ?
  84. 84. How might we … ? Tell
  85. 85. Constraints Avoid screens Avoid keyboards
  86. 86. Example: Amazon Fresh Source: Amazon
  87. 87. Example: Amazon Source: Amazon Amazon App Amazon Dash Amazon Dash Button Amazon Watch App Amazon Echo
  88. 88. 100 × Go for quantity Keep it short Encourage wild ideas Defer judgment Build on the ideas of others One conversation at a time Stay on topic Be visual Ideate
  89. 89. Your task 3+7 Minutes99 Ideas1 Brief
  90. 90. 10 Minutes1 Idea 2 Concept Your task
  91. 91. What are your two fav concept ideas? Report
  92. 92. Note What’s good? What to improve?
  93. 93. Feedback
  94. 94. Prototyping
  95. 95. Prototyping with Makedo
  96. 96. View As technology moves into more and more things and ultimately into humans, we must ensure that it is enhancing the human experience not challenging it. “ ” — @Punchcut http://punchcut.com/perspectives/connecting-the-internet-of-things/
  97. 97. Wayfindr
  98. 98. Why prototype Collaborate by doing, not talking Show the thing, communicate with evidence Learn with your hands
  99. 99. Inspiration for your prototype
  100. 100. Video app recommendations Snapchat (10 sec) Instagram Video (15 sec) Spark (45 sec)
  101. 101. Your task 90 Minutes1 Prototype1 Concept
  102. 102. Your presentation 1 HMW 1 Advantage1 Concept
  103. 103. What is your machine? Your show-timeShow
  104. 104. Note What’s good? What to improve?
  105. 105. a user with a rather complex life the need to do grocery shopping online together with other family members. Amazon Dash note-taking device is directly connected to the shop the Amazon smartphone app Dash is easy to use with a single hand and even while multi-tasking Communicate For TARGET CUSTOMER CUSTOMER NEED CONCEPT NAME MARKET CATEGORY who has that Unlike the is a ONE KEY BENEFIT COMPE- TITION . . UNIQUE DIFFEREN- TIATOR APPS AS MACHINES — Acceleration tool Elevator Pitch
  106. 106. Setting their jobs to be done into context Agenda Solving the job by leveraging more human capabilities Pitching your machine Discovering what apps and their services do for us
  107. 107. Setting their jobs to be done into context Agenda Solving the job by leveraging more human capabilities Pitching your machine Discovering what apps and their services do for us
  108. 108. What is your machine? Your show-timeShow
  109. 109. IoT Source: @Punchcut http://punchcut.com/perspectives/connecting-the-internet-of-things/
  110. 110. Wrap-up
  111. 111. In 2020 7.6 billion people 50 billion devices 6.58 devices per person Source: Cisco, ‘Connections Counter: The Internet of Everything in Motion’ http://newsroom.cisco.com/feature-content?type=webcontent&articleId=1208342
  112. 112. Not more information, but better information Less smartphone dependency, but objects as messengers Focus on people, support, protect, empower them Consider
  113. 113. How the computer sees us Source: Physical Computing, O'Sullivan & Igoe http://www.amazon.com/Physical-Computing-Sensing-Controlling-Computers/dp/159200346X
  114. 114. — Brian Eno, artist http://archive.wired.com/wired/archive/7.01/eno_pr.html Tools that endure have limited options. These limitations become sources of emotional meaning. “ ”
  115. 115. 1995– Internet via stationary computer 2005– Internet in the palm 2015– Internet in all aspects of life Level of intimacy to user Realise Low High
  116. 116. Realise App layer Connected objects layer Service layer
  117. 117. View [The internet of things] will require businesses to fundamentally transform their approaches to be successful in this new era. “ ” — @Punchcut http://punchcut.com/perspectives/connecting-the-internet-of-things/
  118. 118. No market need Ran out of cash Not the right team Get outcompeted Pricing / cost issues Poor marketing Ignore customers Products mis-timed Lose focus Disharmony on team 13% 14% 14% 17% 17% 18% 19% 23% 29% 42% Top 10 reasons young businesses fail Source: Top 10 Reasons Startups Fail, based on an analysis of 101 post-mortems http://www.cbinsights.com
  119. 119. Balance Viable DesirableFeasible Business UsersTechnology
  120. 120. Do’s Capture the context State the problem Clarify the benefit
  121. 121. Question What if your connected thing is being hacked? How can you make sure you harm its users the least?
  122. 122. Consider Credit card hacks (e.g. Target) Services & servers hacked (e.g. Sony, Playstation) Unprotected cameras (e.g. insecam.org)
  123. 123. View Minimal Viable Data – What is the least amount of data you can collect to create a good product and experience? “ ” — @GoldenKrishna https://twitter.com/Martin_Jordan/status/667336477349650432
  124. 124. Scary Smart City
  125. 125. R.I.P. Little Printer
  126. 126. R.I.P. Little Printer
  127. 127. Two last things Documentation Publish your video project with sheets until Sunday, 15 May Feedback Tell us what you liked, you wished, you learnt
  128. 128. Credits Icons: Max Hancock David Padrosa Jakob Vogel Ola Möller
 Jeremy J Bristol Siddharth Dasari Martin Smith Deadtype Photos: Nokia Amazon Thanks! Nicolas Morand Luis Prado Simple Icons
 Luiza Peixe
 Scott Lewis Phil Goodwin Michael Senkow Jakob Schneider Sherrinford Edward Boatman Cengiz SARI Mister Pixel

×