Service Ecosystems for Afterschool Care in High Risk Urban Communities

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32% of children under 13 in Dallas are without afterschool care. During this time of day they are vulnerable to crime, drugs, and ses. This case study of Dallas maps community assets for a shared vision of proactive and restorative initiatives to make high risk communities whole. Transformation Framework

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Service Ecosystems for Afterschool Care in High Risk Urban Communities

  1. 1. Service Ecosystems for Afterschool Care In High-risk Urban Communities Martha G. Russell Mapping Community Assets for Shared Vision mediaX-THNK Global Innovation Leadership Workshop – Feb 2014
  2. 2. Innovation Ecosystems Network • Data-driven visualization of resource flows for innovation – Talent – Finances – Information • Roots in evaluation of service systems – Technology-based economic development programs – Family-oriented, community-based services systems – Mapping community assets • Afterschool programs • School-community interactions • Powered by new social network analysis tools
  3. 3. Community – Family – Youth – City System Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  4. 4. Wholeness Indicators Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  5. 5. Wholeness Indicators • Regional function – – – – Middle class housing Fit housing Owner Occupancy Business and service organizations – Immigration • Community function – – – – Crime index Families not in wealth Access to retail Life span Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012 • Family function – School holding power – Few crisis services needed – Low need for foster care • Youth function (school enables) – – – – Graduation rate SAT Scores Voter Turnout Teacher Retention
  6. 6. Wholeness Indicators Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  7. 7. Schools Are Central to Ecosystem Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  8. 8. Schools Are Central to Ecosystem Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  9. 9. Support Services Maintain Strength in the Ecosystem • What’s working – Neighborhood and branch organizations provide family services and youth enrichment activities. • What’s not working – Options for enrichment learning are limited. – Services tend to be focused to individuals rather than families. – Schools and school support programs are not consistently integrated into service networks.
  10. 10. When System Is Not WHOLE Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  11. 11. When System Is Not WHOLE • Parents cannot get to the jobs that are available, even if they are eligible. • Housing is substandard, and many are homelessness. • Adults’ coping skills are inadequate, resulting in behaviors that injure themselves and others. • Parents who perceive options choose alternatives to public school. Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012 • Children are unsupervised and lack discipline. • Children’s mental, physical and developmental health suffers. • Youth are truant and drop out of school. • Teen births and violence limit youth’s positive choices. • Youth do not engage in community and family building
  12. 12. When System Is Not WHOLE Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  13. 13. Redirect Services RESTORE
  14. 14. Redirect Services RESTORE • Provide housing and transportation. • Encourage employment and ownership. • Support parents’ ability to provide necessities for children. • Support language acquisition and acculturation. Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012 • Provide supervision and positive role models. • Provide tutoring and engage children in learning. • Give youth an opportunity to express selves and contribute. • Redirect youth to give them a second chance.
  15. 15. Redirect Services RESTORE Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  16. 16. South Dallas
  17. 17. Asset Mapping Process • Introduce project via visible, influentials – – – – Service providers willing but busy Teachers – limited availability & time Principals – need anonymity Superintendents – autonomous mindset • Provide incentives for participation • Identify potential for synergy & leadership • Provide feedback on participation to build engagement and networks for change • Continually monitor and refine plan Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  18. 18. Evaluation Process • • • • • • Description of the function Criteria for functionality Indicators of dysfunction Preventative measures Remedial actions Changes over time Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  19. 19. South Dallas System Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  20. 20. Afterschool Programs Dallas County Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012 Russell, M.G., and Smith, M. A. (2011) “Network Analysis of a Regional Ecosystem of Afterschool Programs,” Afterschool Matters, Winter.
  21. 21. Afterschool Programs Dallas County Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012 Russell, M.G., and Smith, M. A. (2011) “Network Analysis of a Regional Ecosystem of Afterschool Programs,” Afterschool Matters, Winter.
  22. 22. Program and Financial Resources for Dallas Afterschool Programs Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012 Russell, M.G., and Smith, M. A. (2011) “Network Analysis of a Regional Ecosystem of Afterschool Programs,” Afterschool Matters, Winter.
  23. 23. Number of Children Serviced by Financial Resources for Dallas Afterschool Programs Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012 Russell, M.G., and Smith, M. A. (2011) “Network Analysis of a Regional Ecosystem of Afterschool Programs,” Afterschool Matters, Winter.
  24. 24. 32% of Dallas School-age Children Unsupervised Afterschool • ~20% supervised in home-based care • Vulnerable programs dependent on single source • Program stability improves with diversified resources base (program and financial) • Over-demand, waiting lists in high risk areas, subsidized programs • Empty slots & program closings in low risk parent-fee programs • Definition of community is highly ambiguous – Where I live – Where I work – Where I take my kids Martha G Russell, AHFE 2012
  25. 25. Transformative Collaborations DALLAS AFTERSCHOOL NETWORK Iterative Alignment Impact Co-Create Value Shared Vision Transformation Event Coalition Interact & Feedback Martha G. Russell, Kaisa Still, Jukka Huhtamaki, and Neil Rubens, “Transforming innovation ecosystems through shared vision and network orchestration,” Triple Helix IX Conference, Stanford University, July 13, 2011.
  26. 26. Transform Through Shared Vision • Know • Cultivate • Orchestrate 26 Innovation Ecosystem Netw
  27. 27. Thank You Martha.Russell@stanford.edu

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