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Cannabis Science Conference 2019: CBDV Fundamental Collaboration

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Cannabis Science Conference 2019: CBDV Fundamental Collaboration

  1. 1. Collaborative Research for Fundamental Insight into Cannabis Production Dr. Markus Roggen
  2. 2. Fundamental Collaboration • Fundamental Questions • Collaboration, Current • Fundamental Research • Collaboration, Future
  3. 3. Fundamental Questions • What to produce? • Which cannabis cultivar is the right one? • How to grow cannabis? • How to process cannabis? • How to extract cannabis? • How to formulate cannabis extracts? • How to treat patients with cannabis products?
  4. 4. A Mature Market Demands Cannabis Extracts Concentrates may surpass flower as the #1 product in the US. 2017 2022 Flower Concentrates Edibles Other Source: Arcview & BDSAnalytics Cannabis Intelligence Briefing
  5. 5. A Mature Market Demands Cannabis Extracts NorthAmerica’s expansion (2015: $5bn to 2018: $11bn) reduces cannabis price
  6. 6. Type of Cannabis Extracts There is a dizzying array of products available and various extraction methods. • Hash, Rosin • Shatter, wax • Distillate, Isolate • Crude, HTFSE, …
  7. 7. Complex Biotech Discovery Ventures CBDV is a young research venture that seeks to add fundamental scientific insight to the field of cannabis production. We seek to support the cannabis industry by establishing a centralized hub in Vancouver, BC for collaborative research focused on: • Process Design • Process Optimization • Process Analytics • Formulation Research
  8. 8. CBDV’s Collaborative Research CBDV collaborates with academic, industry and private groups around the globe. Some highlights of those collaborations are: • University of British Columbia, Vancouver • Loyalist College, Belleville • Vialpando, LLC by Dr. Monica Vialpando • Veridient Science by Dr. Linda Klumpers • Fritsch Milling • PerkinElmer
  9. 9. Fundamental Questions • What to produce? • Which cannabis cultivar is the right one? • How to grow cannabis? • How to process cannabis? • How to extract cannabis? • How to formulate cannabis extracts? • How to treat patients with cannabis products?
  10. 10. Fundamental Questions • What to produce? • Which cannabis cultivar is the right one? • How to grow cannabis? • How to process cannabis? • How to extract cannabis? • How to formulate cannabis extracts? • How to treat patients with cannabis products?
  11. 11. Processing Extracts Decarboxylation is one of the most critical processing steps.
  12. 12. How do You Decarboxylate? There is a lack of universal agreement regarding reaction conditions. • Oven heating • Hot plate • Microwave • Oil bath • Other?
  13. 13. Don’t Decarboxylate to Long Problems of excess heating: • Availability of instruments • Higher costs of production • Side reaction and degradation • Lower yields 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 THC THC(%) CBN&d8-THC(%) d8-THC CBN Elapsed Time (Minutes)
  14. 14. Reaction Monitoring of Decarboxylation Current • Subjective determination of reaction completeness • Reactionary approach • Inconsistent batches • Lack of quality & process control vs. Optimal • Rapid • Simple • Accurate • Small sample volume
  15. 15. In-Process Analytics Infrared spectroscopy is a useful tool for reaction monitoring. BG62-64 T0 Name Sample 023 By Administrator Date Thursday, July 12 2018 Description 1750 8001600 1400 1200 1000 0.23 -0.01 -0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 0.14 0.16 0.18 0.20 0.22 cm-1 A _ Start THCA 20.87 % End THCA 1.56 %
  16. 16. Monitoring THCA In-Process 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 THCA(%) Elapsed Time (Minutes)
  17. 17. Monitoring THCA In-Process 16 26 36 46 56 66 76 16 26 36 46 56 66 76 Predicted%THC Reference % THC
  18. 18. Monitoring THCA In-Process 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 THCA(%) Elapsed Time (Minutes)
  19. 19. Monitoring THCA In-Process Why bother? Optimization Precision Decarboxylation
  20. 20. Decarboxylation Observation Not all Decarboxylations are equal
  21. 21. Collaboration: Computational Studies Steric vs. Electronic: Exploring the Rate Difference in THCA and CBDA Decarboxylation 1T-S1 1C-S1 Bot View THCA CDBA Top View
  22. 22. Collaboration: Computational Studies kJ/mol 0 50 100 150 200 0 1 2 3 4 5 61T 1C 1C-S1(MeOH) 1C-S3(MeOH) 1C-TS2(MeOH) 1T-TS2(MeOH)
  23. 23. Collaboration: Computational Studies Key Findings: • Rate determining step is the intermolecular protonation • Rate difference is due to steric rather than electronic effects 1C-TS2(MeOH)
  24. 24. Fundamental Questions • What to produce? • Which cannabis cultivar is the right one? • How to grow cannabis? • How to process cannabis? • How to extract cannabis? • How to formulate cannabis extracts? • How to treat patients with cannabis products?
  25. 25. What is Cannabis? • Indica vs. Sativa Phylos Bioscience
  26. 26. What is Cannabis? • Indica vs. Sativa • Strain names
  27. 27. What is Cannabis? • Indica vs. Sativa • Strain names • High THC vs. high CBD John S. Abrams, PhD; The CESC
  28. 28. Chemovars • Indica vs. Sativa • Strain names • High THC vs. high CBD • Chemovars
  29. 29. Chemovars Hazekamp, et al.; Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research 2016, 1.1 • Indica vs. Sativa • Strain names • HighTHC vs. high CBD • Chemovars
  30. 30. Chemovars Orser C, Johnson S, Speck M, HilyardA,Afia I (2018)TerpenoidChemoprofiles Distinguish Drug-type Cannabis sativa L. Cultivars in Nevada. Nat ProdChem Res 6: 304. • Indica vs. Sativa • Strain names • HighTHC vs. high CBD • Chemovars
  31. 31. Chemovars • Indica vs. Sativa • Strain names • High THC vs. high CBD • Chemovars DiscOmic by Digamma Consulting
  32. 32. Unknown unknowns CBDV’s Metabolite Database
  33. 33. Unknown unknowns CBDV’s Metabolite Database • 24 compound categories • 762 compounds
  34. 34. Unknown unknowns CBDV’s Metabolite Database • 24 compound categories • 762 compounds • 75 cannabinoids • 416 terpenes
  35. 35. Known unknowns Solubility data from literature & in-house data Solubility of cannabinoids in supercritical CO2 at 326K K.H. Perrotin-Brunel et al. / J. of Supercritical Fluids 55 (2010) 603–608
  36. 36. Known unknowns Solubility data from literature & in-house data % Decarb THC/THCA S.M. 7h 22h SuperCrit 8.0% 25% 10% SubCrit 14% 25% 14% CBG/total Canna. S.M. 7h 22h SuperCrit 2.9% 6.% 2.9% SubCrit 3.0% 13% 4.9%
  37. 37. Unknown knowns DoE surfaces of solubility
  38. 38. Fundamental Questions • What to produce? • Which cannabis cultivar is the right one? • How to grow cannabis? • How to process cannabis? • How to extract cannabis? • How to formulate cannabis extracts? • How to treat patients with cannabis products?
  39. 39. Collaboration: Extraction Optimization For what: • Yield per Run YpR • Yield per Week YpW • Cannabinoid Conc. CC • Terpene Content TC • Recovery Rec • … With what: • Temperature T • Pressure P • Time t • Flow Rate FR • Particle Size PS • …
  40. 40. Size does Matter Small and even particle size enables: • Higher packing density • Improved extraction efficiency 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 Non-Ground Food Blender 2 mm 6 mm 10 mm %Recovery Cannabinoid Recovery by Size 75 80 85 90 95 Non-Ground Food Blender 2 mm 6 mm 10 mm %Recovery Terpene Recovery by Size
  41. 41. Collaboration: Extraction Optimization Temperature (˚C) Pressure (psi) Yield THC (g) 34 60 1100 1900 47 1500 0
  42. 42. Collaboration: Extraction Optimization Temperature (˚C) Pressure (psi) Yield THC (g) 34 60 1100 1900 47 1500 0
  43. 43. Collaboration: Extraction Optimization Temperature (˚C) Pressure (psi) Yield THC (g) 34 60 1100 1900 47 1500 0
  44. 44. Collaboration: SFE Database
  45. 45. Collaboration: SFE Database
  46. 46. Collaboration: SFE Database
  47. 47. Collaboration: SFE DoE SFE optimized for single separator Cannabinoid Concentration
  48. 48. Collaboration: SFE DoE SFE optimized for single separator Cannabinoid Yield
  49. 49. Fundamental Collaboration • Fundamental Questions • Collaboration, Current • Fundamental Research • Collaboration, Future
  50. 50. Collaborative Data Analysis cbdvl.com/freedata • Free extraction data analysis file • Basic analysis tools • Send back for in-depth analysis (info@cbdvl.com)
  51. 51. Collaborative Data Analysis cbdvl.com/freedata • Free extraction data analysis file • Basic analysis tools • Send back for in-depth analysis (info@cbdvl.com)
  52. 52. Thank You Thanks go to our collaborators: • Blake Grauerholz, OutCo • Taylor Trah, OutCo • Dr. Allison Justice, Hemp Mine • Ariel Bohman, PerkinElmer • Dr. Toby Astill, PerkinElmer • Barry Schubmehl, Fritsch Milling • Antonio Marelli, Imperial College • Weiying He, UBC
  53. 53. CBDV Team Luiz Geraldo – VP Finance Currently pursuing his MBA, Luiz is an Industrial Engineer and has 5 years of experience in strategy and operations consulting and strategic planning. Gursaanj Singh Bajaj – Data Science Associate Gursaanj is an Astrophysics major in the department of Physics and Astronomy at UBC, with a background in data analysis. He will be going into his 4th year of his undergraduate degree. Kendra Payne – VP Business Operations Experienced Program Manager/Coordinator and Senior Administrator with a demonstrated history of working in the education management and biotechnology industries. Skilled in Biotechnology, Project Coordination and Life Sciences. Callum MacPhee – Business Associate Callum is a going into his fourth year at the University of British Columbia and is pursuing a Bachelor of Commerce. Sajni Shah – Research Associate Currently studying Chemical Biology in the Department of Chemistry at UBC. She is going into her final year of her undergraduate studies. Klara Wyse – Marketing Associate Klara is a Media Studies and Urban Studies student at UBC, going into their fourth year.
  54. 54. Dr. Markus Roggen markus@cbdvl.com

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