MarketTrend: The U.S. Market for Chef- and Foodservice-branded Food Sold at Retail

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MarketTrend: The U.S. Market for Chef- and Foodservice-branded Food Sold at Retail

  1. 1.    Get more info on this report!MarketTrend: The U.S. Market for Chef- and Foodservice-branded Food Sold atRetailMay 1, 2009Countries covered: United StatesThe popularity of celebrity chefs and restaurant culture among consumers continues togrow, driven in large part by the dominance of food-related media, such as televisionprogramming, magazines and websites, and cookbooks. The big question is whetherconsumers will even give a hoot about brand mystique in the midst of an economiccrisis as more pressing issues are at hand. Instead of feeling good about expensive andconspicuous purchases as they have in the past, many consumers will increasingly feelgood about not spending in 2009. Not just on discretionary items, but on staple goodsas well—including food.Though the market for chef-and restaurant-branded food products in the U.S. grew atan annual rate of eight percent between 2004 and 2008 in dollar sales, in unit termsgrowth was much less exciting. And for 2009, a new era may be beginning. For foodmarketers the prospects of changing market dynamics due to shifting consumerpreferences, economic worries and a New Frugality may be challenging but can also beviewed as providing new and exciting opportunities.MarketTrend: The U.S. Market for Chef- and Foodservice-branded Food Sold at Retailexamines these issues and many others by looking at the current market, trends, majorbrands, and consumer preferences. The report presents concise, thought-provokinganalyses of various aspects of the industry and provides a forecast for the marketthrough 2013.MethodologyThe report uses data from IRI, which tracks sales through mass retail channels (exceptWal-Mart) and Product Launch Analytics, a service of Datamonitor, which provides dataon new product introductions. Other research data were gathered from tradeassociations, business journals, financial reports and brand literature, and from theInternet for other useful information on the topic.
  2. 2. Where possible, discussion in terms of unit sales has been included to provide a pictureof “real” growth. Sales for all of 2008 were estimated by Packaged Facts based on salesthrough September 2008 or in some cases through part of November 2008.Table of ContentsChapter 1: Executive Summary Scope Chef Brands Restaurant Brands Categories Items Omitted MethodologyMarket Size and Growth Chef/Foodservice Food Products Top $3.7 Billion Figure 1-1: U.S. Chef- and Foodservice-Branded Food Products Market, 2004- 2008 (in billions $)Market Forecast Market to Reach $4.4 Billion by 2013 Figure 1-2: U.S. Chef- and Restaurant-Branded Food Products Market Forecast, 2008-2013 (in billions $)Brand Activity Brand Activity Overview: Casual Dining Dominates Table 1-1: Top 20 IRI-Tracked Chef and Foodservice Brands, 2004-2008 (in millions $)Consumer Trends Food Products Market Landscape The Power of a Name Chef-Brands May Benefit More than Foodservice Eating Patterns Shifting Cooking Ingredients and Kitchen Staples Important Again Ethnic Food is Growing Diverse America Has Diverse Tastes Smaller Households Positive for Market Consumer Health Concerns Paramount What about Convenience? Company Ethics and Added Values Important to Consumers Consumers See Benefits of Social ResponsibilityNew Product Introduction Trends Changing American Taste Buds New Product Introductions Drop 38% in 2008 Sauces, Dressings & Condiments See Most Introductions New Product Claims: Solidify Premium & Convenience Positions Emerging Benefit Areas: Health and Sustainability What’s Next in Flavor? Ever-Growing World of Super Foods and Flavors
  3. 3. Meal Kit Concept Sees Constant Stream of Introductions Empty Nesters Targeted Add-ins Help Consumer Make it FresherLooking Ahead Positive Marketing Karma in Appropriate and Authentic Licenses Celebrity Chefs Keep Personal Brands Fresh with Cookbook Offerings Many Top Chain Restaurants Not in Retail Market Table 1-2: Restaurants and Institutions Top 400 Rankings: Top 20 Family Dining and Top 20 Casual Dining, 2008 Do Not Disengage from Loyal Consumers Target Younger Shoppers Now for Long Term Make Use of Alternative Medias Product Placement Opportunities Abound Certain Purchases Outside of Branded More LikelyChapter 2: Market Trends Scope Chef Brands Restaurant Brands Categories Items Omitted Methodology Food Products Market Landscape Consumer Health Concerns Paramount Eating Patterns Shifting Ethnic Food is Growing An Opportunity Ready to EatMarket Size and Growth Chef/Foodservice Food Products Top $3.7 Billion Figure 2-1: U.S. Chef- and Foodservice-Branded Food Products Market, 2004- 2008 (in billions $) Table 2-1: U.S. Chef- and Foodservice-Branded Food Products Market Year- over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Foodservice Products Garner Lion’s Share of Market Figure 2-2: Dollar Share of U.S. Chef- and Foodservice-Branded Food Products by Brand Type, 2008 (%) IRI-Tracked Sales Account for 54% of Market Dinners and Entrées More than Half of IRI-Tracked Sales Table 2-2: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of U.S. Chef- and Foodservice-Branded Food Products by Category, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Condiments, Sauces and Seasonings Market Saturated Figure 2-3: Share of IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of U.S. Chef- and Foodservice- Branded Food Products, by Category, 2008 (%) Side Dishes Grow 8% Bob Evans: The King of Breakfast Table 2-3: IRI-Tracked Unit Sales of U.S. Chef- and Foodservice-Branded Food Products by Category, 2004-2008 (unites, in millions)
  4. 4. Soup Growth Cooling Frozen Desserts Getting Hot Figure 2-4: Share of IRI-Tracked Unit Sales of U.S. Chef- and Foodservice- Branded Food Products, by Category, 2008 (%) Top 20 Products Marie Callender’s Leads California Pizza Kitchen Posts Strong Growth Ken’s Steak House Salad Dressing Growth Slows Boston Market Serves Up Savory Sales Other Notable Products Table 2-4: Top 20 IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of U.S. Chef- and Restaurant- Branded Food Products, 2004-2008 (in millions $) Table 2-5: Top 20 IRI-Tracked Unit Sales of U.S. Chef- and Restaurant-Branded Food Products, 2004-2008 (in millions units)Market Forecast Market to Reach $4.4 Billion by 2013 Figure 2-5: U.S. Chef- and Restaurant-Branded Food Products Market Forecast, 2008-2013 (in billions $) Economy, Shifting Consumer Buying Habits to Cause Decline in 2009 Table 2-6: U.S. Chef- and Restaurant-Branded Food Products Market Forecast Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2008-2013 (in millions $)Chapter 3: Brand Activity Brand Activity Overview: Casual Dining Dominates Fast Food Reigns in Mid-Tier Chefs and Restaurateurs Operate Below $50 Million Mark Family Friendly Foods of Marie Callender’s and Bob Evan’s Top Out Table 3-1: Top 20 IRI-Tracked Chef and Foodservice Brands (in millions $) Fine Dining Not to Be Left Out Figure 3-1: Top 20 Chef and Foodservice Brands in Retail, U.S. by IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales, 2008 (%) Chef Brands Carve a Niche Old School Classics, Nathans and White Castle Have Good ShowingSelected Chef Brand ProfilesEmeril’s Overview Performance Table 3-2: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Emeril’s-Branded Food Products, 2004- 2008 (in thousands $) Table 3-3: IRI-Tracked Unit Sales of Emeril’s-Branded Food Products, 2004- 2008 (in thousands units) Selected New Product Introductions Table 3-4: Selected Emeril’s Branded New Product Introductions, 2004-2008Paula Deen Overview Performance
  5. 5. Table 3-5: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Paula Deen-Food Products, 2007-2008 (in thousands $) Table 3-6: IRI-Tracked Unit Sales of Paula Deen-Food Products, 2007-2008 (in thousands units) Selected New Product Introductions Table 3-7: Selected Paula Deen Branded New Product Introductions, 2004-2008Wolfgang Puck Overview Performance Table 3-8: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Wolfgang Puck-Branded Food Products, 2004-2008 (in thousands $) Table 3-9: IRI-Tracked Unit Sales of Wolfgang Puck-Branded Food Products, 2004-2008 (in thousands units) Selected New Product Introductions Table 3-10: Selected Wolfgang Puck’s Branded New Product Introductions, 2004-2008Selected Foodservice Brand ProfilesBoston Market Overview Performance Table 3-11: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Boston Market-Branded Food Products, 2004-2008 (in thousands $) Table 3-12: IRI-Tracked Unit Sales of Boston Market-Branded Food Products, 2004-2008 (in thousands units) Selected New Product Introductions Table 3-13: Selected Boston Market Branded New Product Introductions, 2004- 2008Margaritaville Overview Performance Table 3-14: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Margaritaville-Branded Food Products, 2004-2008 (in thousands $) Table 3-15: IRI-Tracked Unit Sales of Margaritaville-Branded Food Products, 2004-2008 (in thousands units) Selected New Product Introductions Table 3-16: Selected Margaritaville Branded New Product Introductions, 2004- 2008Taco Bell Overview Performance Table 3-17: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Taco Bell Food Products, 2004-2008 (in thousands $) Table 3-18: IRI-Tracked Unit Sales of Taco Bell Food Products, 2004-2008 (in thousands units) Selected New Product Introductions Table 3-19: Selected Taco Bell Branded New Product Introductions, 2004-2008
  6. 6. Chapter 4: Consumer Trends The Power of a Name Sauces to Saucepans Get the Brand Treatment Is the Party Over? Chef-Brands May Benefit, Foodservice May Suffer Consumer Behavior Shifts Shift in Consumer Psychology Consumers Get Thrifty: Cook in More, Dine Out Less Cooking at Home More Could Be Longer Term Trend Celebrity Chefs Making It Easier Cooking Ingredients and Kitchen Staples Important Again Chef, Foodservice Brands Show Mixed Signals Frozen Foods, The Bastion of Foodservice Branding May Suffer The Recession Is an Opportunity Determining Value Key for Consumer Consumers More Informed Than Ever Internet the New Value Tool Table 4-1: Statements Indicating Consumer Role as Researcher, Fact-Finder, Planner, Spring 2008 (index) Diverse America Has Diverse Tastes Hispanic, Asian and Multi-Racial to Drive Population Growth Table 4-2: U.S. Population Estimate and Projections by Race, 2007-2020 (in thousands persons) Food Business Responds to Consumer Interest in Ethnic Flavors Interest in a Variety of Cuisines Growing Table 4-3: Popular Ethnic Food Categories by Number of Recipes on Popular Consumer Websites, FoodNetwork.com, 2006 versus 2008 Smaller Households Positive for Market Table 4-4: U.S. Households by Number of Persons in Household, 2003-2007 (in millions) America’s More Healthful Lifestyle Ingredients, Portion Control Lead Concerns Dieting No Longer about Weight What about Convenience? Can Health, Convenience, and Thrift Co-exist? Consumer Food Fears Company Ethics and Added Values Important to Consumers Good Causes a Good Draw New York’s Tavern on the Green Embraces a Cause Consistency May Be the Best Policy Consumers See Benefits of Social Responsibility Consumers Sought More Organic Foods, Marketers Respond Social Responsibility Goes Mainstream Environmental Benefits May Lead In Bad Economy Consumers Less CommittedChapter 5: New Product Introduction Trends
  7. 7. Changing American Taste Buds New Product Introductions Drop 38% in 2008 Table 5-1: Estimated Number of Chef- and Foodservice-Branded Introductions, U.S., 2004-2008* Sauces, Dressings & Condiments See Most Introductions Figure 5-1: Share of Chef- and Foodservice-Branded Introductions by Segment, U.S., 2004-2008 (percent) New Product Claims: Solidify Premium & Convenience Positions Opportunity in Other Emerging Benefit Areas, Especially Health and Sustainability Table 5-2: Total New Food Introduction Tags, 2004 & 2008 versus 2004-2008 Chef- and Foodservice-Brand Tags New Product Flavors: Trend Toward Savory and Spicey but Not Exotic Table 5-3: Top 20 Chef- and Foodservice-Branded Flavors, 2004-2008 What Comes After Chinese, Italian and Mexican? Table 5-4: Non-traditional Ethnic Foods Consumption by Age, Percent Consuming Twice a Month or More, 2007 Mapping a Food Trend Ever-Growing World of Flavors Super Foods Still Getting Good Press Super Foods in Chef and Restaurant Introductions Table 5-5: Selected Foods Deemed Super Meal Kit Concept Sees Constant Stream of Introductions Empty Nesters Targeted Add-ins Help Consumer Make it Fresher Some Brands Busier with Introductions Than Others Table 5-6: Selected List of New Product Introductions, 2004-2008Chapter 6: Looking Ahead Positive Marketing Karma in Appropriate and Authentic Licenses Restaurant Names, Licensing and Diet Tie-Ins Celebrity Chefs Keeping Personal Brands Fresh with Cookbook Offerings Table 6-1: Selected List from Top 100 Chef Cook Book Titles on barnesandnoble.com, March 2009 Chef Versus Personality Top Restaurant Cook Books Highlight Opportunity in Healthier and High End Products Table 6-2: Selected List from Top 100 Restaurant Cook Book Titles on barnesandnoble.com, March 2009 Many Top Chain Restaurants Already in Retail Market Table 6-3: Restaurants and Institutions Top 400 Rankings: Top 20 Family Dining, 2008 Table 6-4: Restaurants and Institutions Top 400 Rankings: Top 20 Casual Dining, 2008 Less Activity in Sandwich, Café, Mexican, Seafood and Burgers Table 6-5: Restaurants and Institutions Top 400 Rankings: Top 20 Sandwich/Bakery-Café, 2008
  8. 8. Table 6-6: Restaurants and Institutions Top 400 Rankings: Top 20 Mexican, 2008 Table 6-7: Restaurants and Institutions Top 400 Rankings: Top 15 Seafood, 2008 Table 6-8: Restaurants and Institutions Top 400 Rankings: Top 20 Burgers, 2008 Do Not Disengage from Loyal Consumers Target Younger Shoppers Now for Long Term Take Marketing to Virtual Heights Make Use of Alternative Medias Behavioral Targeting in Diverse and Fragmented Market Product Placement Opportunities Abound Certain Purchases Outside of Branded More Likely Couponing Coming Back StrongAppendix: Addresses of Selected MarketersAvailable immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=2091870   US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004 

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