HVAC, 2nd Edition — Green and Global

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HVAC, 2nd Edition — Green and Global

  1. 1. Get more info on this report!HVAC, 2nd Edition — Green and GlobalJanuary 1, 2010The U.S. HVAC market grew 41% in heating systems and 45% in air conditioners from1997 through 2006. This period of growth hit a wall, however, with the housing andcredit market collapse of 2007 and the historic rise in unemployment. From 2006 to2007 heating system installations dropped 24% and air conditioners saw a similardecline of 23%. As the housing market starts to pick up again, the credit crisis subsidesand unemployment figures begin to drop, economic conditions will once again lead toincreased growth in the industry. The green HVAC market should benefit in particularfrom federal and state support of more energy efficient homes and buildings.According to the U.S. Department of Energy, “the average home spends about $1,900annually on energy bills. Heating and cooling accounts for as much as half of a home’senergy use.” The DOE estimates that home owners can reduce their energy bills by upto 20% merely by replacing furnaces, boilers, central air conditioners and heat pumpswith more efficient models. Electric Air-Source Heat Pumps (ASHPs) and GeothermalHeat Pumps (GHPs) offer some of the most efficient heating and cooling methodsavailable today.The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 offers tax credits that home-owners can take advantage of when purchasing new, more energy efficient, higher-SEER HVAC equipment. “Consumers who purchase and install specific products, suchas energy-efficient windows, insulation, doors, roofs, and heating and coolingequipment in existing homes can receive a tax credit for 30% of the cost, up to $1,500,for improvements "placed in service" starting January 1, 2009, through December 31,2010.” Consumers can also receive a 30% tax credit for geothermal heat pumps placedin service before December 31, 2016.Another development that will have an impact on the growth of the HVAC industry is thephasing out of ozone-depleting used as refrigerants in older air conditioners. Havingalready phased out the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) like R-11 and R-12 by 1995,the United States will now begin phasing out the use of the R-22hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerant as of January 1, 2010. According to theEPA, "chemical manufacturers may still produce R-22 to service existing equipment, but
  2. 2. not for use in new equipment.” In other words, while the existing stores of R-22refrigerant can be used for existing equipment, new equipment will be required to usethe alternative R-410A refrigerant instead. That will mean new business for installersand HVAC equipment manufacturers.Further support for more efficient HVAC equipment comes from the DOE’s BuilderChallenge, which supports the construction of cost-effective, net-zero homes throughoutthe United States. The Building Technology Program’s Builder’s Challenge wasdeveloped by the Department of Energy with the goal of offering “affordable net-zeroenergy homes by 2020 and net-zero energy commercial buildings by 2025.” TheDepartment of Energy claims that homes that have already been built with the BTP’sBuilding America best practices “can use 40 percent less energy than comparable newhomes.” The ultimate goal of the program is to offer homebuyers the choice of buying a“cost-neutral, net-zero energy home (NZEH) anywhere in the United States” by 2030.Report MethodologyThe information in HVAC in the U.S., 2nd Edition — Green and Global is based on datafrom the U.S. Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, the U.S.International Trade Commission and the Census Bureau, along with information fromtrade associations such as the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), business journals, company literature andwebsites, and research services such as Simmons Market Research Bureau.What You’ll Get in This ReportHVAC in the U.S., 2nd Edition — Green and Global, makes important predictions andrecommendations regarding the future of this market, and pinpoints ways current andprospective players can capitalize on current trends and spearhead new ones. No othermarket research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive datathat HVAC in the U.S., 2nd Edition — Green and Global offers. Plus, you’ll benefit fromextensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.How You’ll Benefit from This ReportIf your company is already doing business in the HVAC market, or is consideringmaking the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensivepackage of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain athorough understanding of the current market for manufactured housing, as well asprojected markets and trends through 2014.This report will help: Marketing managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for new, more efficient residential and commercial HVAC equipment.
  3. 3. Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for high efficiency HVAC equipment. Advertising agencies working with clients in the banking and retail industries understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel consumers to buy HVAC systems. Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships. Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.Additional InformationMarket Insights: A Selection From The ReportGreen Technology Driving the HVAC MarketAccording to the U.S. Department of Energy, “the average home spends about $1,900annually on energy bills. Heating and cooling accounts for as much as half of a home’senergy use.” Home owners can reduce their energy bills by up to 20% merely byreplacing furnaces, boilers, central air conditioners and heat pumps with more efficientmodels. Electric Air-Source Heat Pumps (ASHPs) and Geothermal Heat Pumps(GHPs) offer some of the most efficient heating and cooling methods available today.While the upfront costs for these types of systems can be higher than conventionalheating and cooling equipment, heat pumps can have higher Heating and SeasonPerformance Factor (HSPF) ratings than conventional systems and use less energy toheat and cool a home. “ASHPs, often used in moderate climates, use the differencebetween outdoor and indoor air temperatures to cool and heat your home,” while GHPscool and heat a home by “by using stable temperature conditions in the ground.” GHPscan also be used for energy-efficient water heating.Recent developments in HVAC technology are offering plausible solutions for energyand environment conservation. These technological innovations not only help to reduceoperating costs, but increase productivity and provide state-of-the-art comfort whilebeing both user-and eco-friendly. Some of these novel technologies include: geo-thermal pumps, under floor air distribution systems, building-integrated photovoltaicsystems, and ductless air conditioners.Not only is the market driven by product innovation, but technological innovation is alsoappearing in product components such as compressors, inverters, heat sinks, andrefrigerants. Double scroll compressors that provide greater efficiency, versatile inverter
  4. 4. technologies that work for high and low-supply voltages, smart computer-controlledcooling fans, and refrigerants such as R410a with low ozone depletion potential are justsome of the technological innovations that manufacturers are incorporating into theirproducts.In the News Green HVAC Gains in Energy-Efficient Geothermal InstallationsNew York, January 21, 2010 - Following a decade of historic double-digit growth, theheating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) market in the United States began adescent in 2007 parallel to housing, credit, and employment collapses.However, the industry is expected to see growth again as tax credits from the AmericanRecovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) help more consumers buy new and existinghomes and update existing systems, according to HVAC, 2nd Edition — Green andGlobal, the latest report from leading energy market research firm SBI Energy. Thegreen HVAC market should benefit in particular from federal and state support of moreenergy efficient homes and buildings.International manufacturers of HVAC devices seek to capitalize on the impending uptickin the market by designing high-efficiency equipment for sale in the U.S. that exceed the13 SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) minimum standard that was establishedby the Department of Energy (DOE) in January 2006. Such equipment would qualify forthe higher standards required to receive the tax credits available through the ARRA.“We project that the market supply of U.S. HVAC shipments should grow at a CAGR(compound annual growth rate) of 4% to reach $14 billion by 2014,” says Shelley Carr,publisher of SBI Energy. “Growth will be driven primarily by the residential and non-residential construction markets. In addition, tax credits, new HVAC innovations, globalexpansion, and renewed investment in the replacement sector will revitalize themarket.”Recent developments in HVAC technologies have been primarily driven by plausiblesolutions to a global energy shortage and an impending sense of environmentalemergency. Focus has also been on reducing operation costs, as well as increasingproductivity and state-of-the-art comfort, leading to expedient and cutting-edgetechnology. New technologies, such as geothermal heat pumps, under-floor airdistribution, and building integrated photovoltaic systems hold the key to future HVACproduct developments.Thanks to the ARRA, homeowners can receive tax credits of up to 30% of the total costof the installation of a geothermal HVAC system for geothermal heat pumps placed inservice before December 31, 2016. The DOE estimates that around 35,000
  5. 5. geothermal/ground-source heat pumps were installed in 2007, despite relatively highinitial costs compared to standard heat pumps. By 2009, the number ofgeothermal/ground-source heat pump installations had reached an average of 90,264per year.According to the DOE, the average home spends about $1,900 annually on energy bills.Heating and cooling accounts for as much as half of a home’s energy use. The DOEestimates that homeowners can reduce their energy bills by up to 20% merely byreplacing furnaces, boilers, central air conditioners and heat pumps with more efficientmodels.HVAC, 2nd Edition — Green and Global examines the effects of the global recessionon investment in commercial and residential HVAC installations. It features imports andexports of HVAC equipment from 2004-2009 and forecasts 2010-2014 as well asindustry trends and opportunities and the incentives being offered for more efficientcommercial and non-commercial (residential) buildings throughout the United States.About SBI EnergySBI Energy (Specialists in Business Information), a division ofMarketResearch.com, publishes research reports in the industrial, energy,building/construction, and automotive/transportation markets. SBI Energy also offers afull range of custom research services.Table of ContentsChapter 1: Executive Summary Introduction Scope of Study Methodology Product Definition and Classification HVAC Equipment Market Slows After Decade of Growth Market for HVAC Equipment Before the Recession Figure 1-1: Number of Air Conditioners and Heating Systems in Households, 1997-2008 (in millions) HVAC Market Changes after the Recession Started Figure 1-2: U.S. Market Supply of HVAC Equipment by Shipment and Import- Export Values, 2004-2008 (in million $) Category Growth Unitary Air Conditioners and Ground Source Heat Pumps Gain in Value Green HVAC Makes its Mark Table 1-1: U.S. Shipment Values of HVAC Equipment by Category and Segment, 2004-2008 (in million $) Exports Table 1-2: Value of U.S. Exports by Country (in thousands $)
  6. 6. Major Export Markets Figure 1-3: U.S. Exports of HVAC Equipment, by Country, 2008 HVAC Equipment Exports in Value Table 1-3: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self- Contained, Less than 2.93 kW-hr, 2004-2008 (in thousand $) Table 1-4: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self- Contained, 2.93 KW-HR or Greater but less than 4.98 KW-HR, 2004-2009 (in thousand $) Table 1-5: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self- Contained, Less Than 2.93 kW-hr (10000 Btu/Hr), 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 1-6: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self- Contained, 2.93 KW-hr or Greater But Less Than 4.98 kW-hr (10000- 16999btu/Hr), 2004-2008 (In Thousands) Market Supply Projection and Outlook Figure 1-4: U.S. Projected Market for HVAC Equipment Shipments, 2009-2014 (in billion $) Table 1-7: Projected U.S. Shipments for HVAC Equipment, by Category, 2009- 2014 (in billion $)Competitive Profiles Trane Builds LEED Silver Certified Office Building in San Antonio Ingersoll Rand Executive Shares Trane’s Environmental Practices at FMA’s Progressive Energy and Environmental Congress Carrier’s New Products Johnson Controls sponsors inaugural Energy Efficiency Hall of FameMarketing Dynamics Market Flooded with a Host of New Products Table 1-8: Sample of New Product Introductions by Major HVAC Manufacturers, 2007-2008 Marketing Moves Beyond 13 SEER Taco Adds 60,000sq ft LEED-Certified Warehouse Trane goes “On the Road with Lou” American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI), formerly Airconditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI)Industry and Market Trends A New Energy for the HVAC Industry Why 13 SEER for Residential Equipment Figure 1-5: Residential and Commercial Energy Consumption in the U.S., 2004- 2008 The Phasing out of R-22 Refrigerants Table 1-9: EPA Timetable for the Hydrochlorofluorocarbon Phase-out by 2030 The Phasing in of R-410A Refrigerants Table 1-10: Manufacturers and their brands names for R-410A HVAC for Leadership in Energy Efficiency and Design (LEED) Buildings Table 1-11: Leadership in Energy Efficiency and Design (LEED) Points
  7. 7. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Means Tax Credits Table 1-12: Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) Efficiency Ratings Table 1-13: Federal Tax Credits for HVAC Equipment for Homeowners, 2009 Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) - A Growing Market Measures to Improve Indoor Air Quality in Homes The Impact of the IAQ Trend on the HVAC Market IAQ Standards: AINSI/ASHRAE Standards 62-200 and 55-2004 Rising Prices Heat Up HVAC Market Figure 1-6: Producer Price Index of Sheet Metal used Air Conditioning Ducts and Stove Pipes, 2004-2009 Figure 1-7: Producer Price Indices for Sheet Metal Used in Roof Ventilators, Louvers, & Dampers for HVAC, 2004-2009 Figure 1-8: Producer Price Indices for Copper, Nickel, Lead and Zinc Mining, 2004-2008 Figure 1-9: Producer Price Indices for Air Conditioning & Heat Transfer Equipment, 2004-2008 Figure 1-10: Producer Price Indices for Air Conditioning & Heat Transfer Equipment, January-September 2009 Unprecedented Increase in Cost of Raw Materials Figure 1-11: Producer Price Index for Cold Rolled Steel Sheet & Strip, Copper & Copper Base Alloy Pipe & Tube, and Aluminum Sheet and Strip, 2004-2008 The Future of HVAC Technology Geothermal HVAC Systems Underfloor Air Distribution SystemsEnd User Builders Challenge and Net-Zero Homes The E-Scale, an Easy Measure of a Home’s Energy Efficiency Air Conditioner Use in American Households Figure 1-12: Percentage of U.S. Households Owning Air Conditioning Units Figure 1-13: U.S. Residential Energy Consumption, 2004-2008 (in trillion Btu) Figure 1-14: U.S. Residential Energy Consumption, First Half of 2009 (in trillion Btu) Decreased Construction Leads to Fewer HVAC Installations Table 1-14: Residential HVAC System Utilization (in thousand housing units) Figure 1-15: U.S. Total Residential Construction, January-June, 2009 (in million $) Consumption Characteristics of Residential Buildings Figure 1-16: Residential Building Primary Electric Energy Breakdown, 2005 (%) Figure 1-17: Type of Air Conditioning Equipment Used by U.S. Households, 2005 Single-Family Detached Homes Use the Most Energy Table 1-15: U.S. Residential Energy Consumption According to Housing Type (in million Btu) The Commercial Building Initiative and EnergyPlus Software Figure 1-18: Percentage of U.S. Commercial Buildings With Cooling Systems(s), 1999, 2003, 2007 (E)
  8. 8. Figure 1-19: Percentage of U.S. Commercial Buildings with Heating Systems(s), 1999, 2003, 2007 (E)Chapter 2: The Imports Market Scope of the Report Methodology Product Definition and Classification HVAC Equipment Market Slows After Decade of Growth Market for HVAC Equipment Before the Recession Figure 2-1: Number of Air Conditioners and Heating Systems in Households, 1997-2008 (in millions) Table 2-1: U.S. Market Value of HVAC Equipment, 2004-2008 (in million $) HVAC Market Changes after the Recession Started Figure 2-2: U.S. Market Supply of HVAC Equipment by Shipment and Import- Export Values, 2004-2008 (in million $) Category Growth Unitary Air Conditioners and Ground Source Heat Pumps Gain in Value Green HVAC Makes its Mark The Split System Solution Heat Transfer Equipment Post Modest Gains in Value but Not in Volume Room Air Conditioners and Dehumidifiers Declining in Value and Volume Non-Electric Furnace Shipments Drop, Alternative Fuel Furnaces Climb Table 2-2: U.S. Shipment Values of HVAC Equipment by Category and Segment, 2004-2008 (in million $) Table 2-3: U.S. Shipments of HVAC Equipment by Category and Segment 2004- 2008 (in number of units) Imports Major Sources of Imports Figure 2-3: Value of U.S. Imports of HVAC Equipment by Country, 2008 HVAC Equipment Imports in Value Window or Wall Type Air Conditioners Table 2-4: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self- Contained, Less than 2.93 KW per Hour, 2004-2009 (in Thousand $) Table 2-5: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self- Contained, 2.93 KW-HR or Greater But Less than 4.98KW-HR, 2004-2009 (in thousand $) Table 2-6: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self- Contained, 4.98 KW-HR or Greater, 2004-2009 (in thousand $) Table 2-7: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines, Window or Wall Type, Not Self-Contained, NESOI, 2004-2009 (in thousand $) Table 2-8: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling Cycle, Self Contained, Not Exceeding 17.58 KW-HR, 2004-2009 (in thousand $) Table 2-9: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heating Cycle, Window or Wall Type 2004-2009 (in thousand $)
  9. 9. Table 2-10: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unitand a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self-Contained, Exceeding17.58 KW-HR, 2004-2009 (in thousand $)Table 2-11: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unitand a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, except Self-Contained,NESOI, 2004-2009 (in thousand $)Table 2-12: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines, andRemote Condenser Type, Other than Year-Round Units, Not Exceeding 17.58KW-HR, 2004-2009 (in thousand $)Table 2-13: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines, andRemote Condenser Type, Other than Year-Round Units, Exceeding 17.58 KW-HR, 2004-2009 (in thousand $)Table 2-14: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating andCooling) not Exceeding 17.58 KW-HR, 2004-2009 (in thousand $)Table 2-15: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating andCooling) Exceeding 17.58 KW-HR, 2004-2009 (in thousand $)Table 2-16: U.S. Imports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit,Water Removal Capacity Less than 35 Liters over a 24 Hour Period, 2004-2009(in Thousand $)Table 2-17: U.S. Imports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating a Refrigerating UnitWater Removal Capacity of 35 Liters and More over a 24 Hour Period, 2004-2009 (in Thousand $)Table 2-18: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines Not Incorporating aRefrigerating Unit, NESOI, 2004-2009 (in Thousand $)Table 2-19: U.S. Imports of Air Humidifiers or Dehumidifiers, Not Incorporating aRefrigerating Unit, 2004-2009 (in Thousand $)HVAC Equipment Imports in UnitsTable 2-20: U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, Less Than 2.93 Kw per Hour (10000 Btu/Hr), 2004-2009 (InThousands)Table 2-21: U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 2.93 KW-hr or Greater But Less Than 4.98kW-hr (10000-16999Btu/Hr), 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 2-22: U.S. Imports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit,Water Removal Capacity Less Than 35 Liters over a 24 Hour Period, 2004-2009(In Thousands)Table 2-23: U.S. Imports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating A Refrigerating Unit,Water Removal Capacity of 35 Liters and More Over a 24 Hour Period, 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 2-24: U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating A Refrigerating Unitand a Valve For Reversal of The Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self-Contain, NotExceeding 17.58 KW-hr, NESOI, 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 2-25: U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating A Refrigerating Unitand a Valve For Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self-Contained, Exceeding17.58kW-hr, NESOI, 2004-2009 (In Thousands)
  10. 10. Table 2-26: U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Except Self-Contained, NESOI, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 2-27: U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self- Contained, 4.98 KW-hr or Greater (17000 Btu/Hr), 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 2-28: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, and a Valve for Reversal of The Cooling/Heat Cycle, Window Or Wall Types, 2002-2005 (In Thousands) Table 2-29: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines, Window or Wall Type, Not Self-contained, NESOI, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 2-30: U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines and Remote Condenser Type, Other Than Year-Round Units, Not Exceeding 17.58 KW-hr (60000 Btu/Hr), NESOI, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 2-31: U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines and Remote Condenser Type, Other Than Year-Round Units, Exceeding 17.58 KW- hr (60000 Btu/Hr), NESOI, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 2-32: U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating and Cooling) Not Exceeding 17.58 KW-hr (60000 Btu/Hr), NESOI, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 2-33: U.S. Imports of Air-Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating and Cooling) Exceeding 17.58 KW-hr (60000 Btu/Hr), NESOI, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 2-34: U.S. Imports of Air Conditioning Machines Not Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, NESOI, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 2-35: U.S. Imports of Air Humidifiers or Dehumidifiers, Not Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Factors Influencing the Market The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Residential Tax Credits for Efficient HVAC Equipment Table 2-36: Consortium of Energy Efficiency’s Highest Efficiency Tiers Effective January 1, 2009 ARRA Commercial and Business Incentives for Efficient HVAC Systems 13 SEER Not High Enough for Tax Credits Residential Construction Plummets, Nonresidential Construction Remains Constant Figure 2-4: U.S. Total Monthly Value of Construction, July 2008 - July 2009 (in billion $) Home Remodeling Will Add to Growth Contributed by Construction Green Technology Driving the HVAC Market HVAC Market Under the WeatherChapter 3: The Export Market Methodology Product Definition and Classification HVAC Market Changes after the Recession Started Figure 3-1: U.S. Market Supply of HVAC Equipment, by Shipment and Import- Export Values, 2004-2008 (in million $)
  11. 11. Category GrowthUnitary Air Conditioners and Ground Source Heat Pumps Gain in ValueGreen HVAC Makes its MarkThe Split System SolutionHeat Transfer Equipment Posted Modest Gains in Value but Not in Volume .107Room Air Conditioners and Dehumidifiers Declining in Value and VolumeNon-Electric Furnace Shipments Drop, While Alternative Fuel Furnaces ClimbTable 3-1: U.S. Shipment Values of HVAC Equipment by Category and Segment,2004-2008 (in million $)Table 3-2: U.S. Shipments of HVAC Equipment by Category and Segment, 2004-2008 (in number of units)ExportsTable 3-3: Value of U.S. Exports by Country (in thousands $)Major Export MarketsFigure 3-2: U.S. Exports of HVAC Equipment, by Country, 2008HVAC Equipment Exports in ValueTable 3-4: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, Less than 2.93 kW-hr, 2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-5: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 2.93 KW-HR or Greater but less than 4.98 KW-HR, 2004-2009 (inthousand $)Table 3-6: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, SelfContained, 4.98 KW-HR or Greater, 2004-2009 (in thousand $)Table 3-7: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating aRefrigerating Unit, and a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heating Cycle,Window or Wall Types, 2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-8: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines, Window or Wall Type, NotSelf Contained, NESOI, 2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-9: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unitand a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self Contained, notexceeding 17.58 KW-HR, 2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-10: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unitand a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self Contained, exceeding17.58 KW-HR, 2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-11: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unitand a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, except Self-Contained,NESOI, 2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-12: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Self Contained Machines andRemote Condenser Type, Other than Year Round Units, Not Exceeding 17.58KW-HR, 2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-13: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Self Contained Machines andRemote Condensers, Other than Year Round Units, Exceeding 17.58 KW-HR,2004-2009 (in thousand $)Table 3-14: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating andCooling) not exceeding 17.58 KW-HR, 2004-2009 (in thousand $)
  12. 12. Table 3-15: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating andCooling) exceeding 17.58 KW-HR, 2002-2005 (in thousand $)Table 3-16: U.S. Exports of Room or Central Station Air Conditioning Units forUse with Water Chillers, NESOI, 2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-17: U.S. Exports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit,2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-18: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating aRefrigerating Unit, NESOI, 2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-19: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines not Incorporating aRefrigerating Unit, NESOI, 2004-2008 (in thousand $)Table 3-20: U.S. Exports of Air Humidifiers or Dehumidifiers, 2004-2008 (inthousand $)HVAC Equipment Exports in UnitsTable 3-21: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, Less Than 2.93 kW-hr (10000 Btu/Hr), 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 3-22: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 2.93 KW-hr or Greater But Less Than 4.98 kW-hr (10000-16999btu/Hr), 2004-2008 (In Thousands)Table 3-23: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Window or Wall Type, Self-Contained, 4.98 KW-hr or Greater (17000 Btu/Hr) (In Thousands)Table 3-24: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating aRefrigerating Unit, and a Valve for Reversal of The Cooling/Heat Cycle, WindowOr Wall Types, 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 3-25: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines, Window or Wall Type,Not Self Contained, Nesoi, 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 3-26: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unitand a Valve for Reversal of The Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self-Contain, NotExceeding 17.58 KW-hr, Nesoi, 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 3-27: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unitand a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Self-Contained, Exceeding17.58 KW-hr, Nesoi, 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 3-28: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Incorporating a Refrigerating Unitand a Valve for Reversal of the Cooling/Heat Cycle, Except Self-Contained,Nesoi, 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 3-29: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines andRemote Condenser Type, Other Than Year-Round Units, Not Exceeding 17.58KW-hr (60000 Btu/Hr), Nesoi, 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 3-30: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Self-Contained Machines andRemote Condenser Type, Other Than Year-Round Units, Exceeding 17.58 KW-hr (60000 Btu/Hr), Nesoi, 2004-2009 (In Thousands)Table 3-31: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating andCooling) Not Exceeding 17.58 KW-hr (60000 Btu/Hr), Nesoi, 2004-2009 (InThousands)Table 3-32: U.S. Exports of Air-Conditioners, Year-Round Units (Heating andCooling) Exceeding 17.58 KW-hr (60000 Btu/Hr), Nesoi, 2004-2009 (InThousands)
  13. 13. Table 3-33: U.S. Exports of Room or Central Station Air Conditioning Units for Use with Water Chillers, Nesoi, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 3-34: U.S. Exports of Dehumidifiers Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 3-35: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, Nesoi, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 3-36: U.S. Exports of Air Conditioning Machines Not Incorporating a Refrigerating Unit, Nesoi, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Table 3-37: U.S. Exports of Air Humidifiers or Dehumidifiers, 2004-2009 (In Thousands) Market Supply Projection and Outlook Figure 3-3: U.S. Projected Market for HVAC Equipment Shipments, 2009-2014 (in billion $) Table 3-38: Projected U.S. Shipments for HVAC Equipment, by Category, 2009- 2014 (in billion $)Chapter 4: Competitive Profiles OverviewTrane Inc Corporate Background Overview The American Standard Legacy Performance When Trane was still an American Standard Figure 4-1: Annual U.S. Revenues of American Standard Companies, 2005-2009 (in billion $) Table 4-1: Trane’s Commercial HVAC Portfolio Table 4-2: Trane’s Residential HVAC Portfolio Table 4-3: American Standard’s Residential HVAC Portfolio New Products & Services Trane Launches Air Purifiers Trane Offers Temporary Cooling Solutions for Emergencies, Planned Maintenance, and Special Events American Standard introduces 20 SEER Heat Pump Nationally Renowned Restaurant Chain Names Trane 2008 Vendor of the Year Trane Ships New Energy-Efficient Air-Cooled Scroll Chillers to Community College in Kentucky Trane Good for Health Trane Targets Business with High Performance Building Services Trane Opens New Parts Centers in Mexico the U.S. Company Snapshot The Nobel Factor and the Environment The Goodwill Factor Trane Woos the Restaurant Industry American Standard Sponsors “Reality Makeover" Environmental Initiatives Trane builds LEED Silver Certified Office Building in San Antonio
  14. 14. Ingersoll Rand Executive Shares Trane’s Environmental Practices at FMA’s Progressive Energy and Environmental Congress Ingersoll Rand’s Extensive Sustainability WebsiteUnited Technologies Corporation Overview Performance Table 4-4: UTC’s HVAC Portfolio Figure 4-2: Annual U.S. Revenues of United Technologies Corporation, 2004- 2009/First Quarter (in billion $) Table 4-5: Carrier’s HVAC Product Portfolio Carrier’s New Products Carrier’s HVAC Systems Preserve Historical Gems Toshiba Carrier Corporation Products Win Accolades Carrier Stimulus Consultants help Commercial Customers take Advantage of Stimulus Act Carrier Unveils its 13-SEER Products at “Power 2006” Convention Carrier Corporation Factory Receive LEED-EB Certification Other Environmental Initiatives Carrier Launches New Software for LEED EA AnalysisJohnson Controls Overview Performance Figure 4-3: Annual Revenues of Johnson Controls HVAC Division, 2004-2008 (in billion $) Table 4-6: York’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio Table 4-7: York’s Residential HVAC Product Portfolio Snapshot York Responds to Higher SEER and the Marketplace with Contractor Training Johnson Controls Offers Dealers On-line Training New Product & Service Introductions Residential and Commercial Innovations Origins of the Unitary Product Group Johnson Controls sponsors inaugural Energy Efficiency Hall of Fame Johnson Controls Commissions Study of Business Leaders’ Attitude toward Investing in Energy Efficiency Major AcquisitionsLennox International, Inc. Overview Performance Figure 4-4: Annual Revenues of Lennox International, Inc. HVAC equipment, 2004-2008 (in billion $) Table 4-8: Lennox’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio Table 4-9: Lennox’s Residential Product Portfolio Company Snapshot New Product Introductions Lennox Maintains High Efficiency in Residential Air Conditioners
  15. 15. Lennox Launches Line of Ozone-friendly Indoor Air Quality Products Strategos Puts Energy Star on the Rooftop Innovations Before the Recession Environmental & Energy-Saving Recognition Lennox and NASCAR How Clean is the Air in Your HomeGoodman Global, Inc Overview Performance Figure 4-5: Annual Revenues of Goodman Global, Inc., 2004-2008 (in billion $) Table 4-10: Goodman Global’s HVAC Product Portfolio Company Snapshot Goodman Raises Prices, Offers Higher SEER and AFUE Reducing, Reusing and Recycling at Goodman Goodman Global Completes Merger with Hellman & Friedman Goodman Introduces the First Wireless PTAC Management Product Servicing Distributors and Contractors Early Advocate of 13 SEER ProtocolPaloma Industries Overview Performance Figure 4-6: Annual Revenues of Paloma Industries, Inc., 2004-2008 (in billion $) Table 4-11: Rheem’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio Table 4-12: Rheem’s Residential HVAC Product Portfolio Table 4-13: Ruud’s Commercial HVAC Product Portfolio Table 4-14: Ruud’s Residential HVAC Product Portfolio Company Snapshot New Product Introductions Consumer Programs Mass Customization Strategy Increases Rheem’s Market ShareChapter 5: Marketing Dynamics Market Flooded with a Host of New Products Table 5-1: New Product Introductions by Major HVAC Manufacturers, 2007-2008 Promotions and Trade Shows Air Conditioning Heating and Refrigeration (AHR) Expo Comfortech ISH North America Power-Gen International IAQA Annual Meeting & Exposition Marketing Moves Beyond 13 SEER Goodman Global Promotes Green Comfort “Shades of Green in 2009” The Contractor - An Important Marketing Tool Air Conditioning Contractors of America Gets Big Corporate Support Mitsubishi Holds Distributor & Contractor Conference Advertising HVAC
  16. 16. Mitsubishi’s Mr. Slim on TV Taco Adds 60,000sq ft LEED-Certified Warehouse Trane goes “On the Road with Lou” LG Promotes its ArtCool Designs of Air Conditioners Fall Promotions Newsletters Gain Prominence Associations and Organizations American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI), Formerly Air- conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA)Chapter 6: Industry and Market Trends A New Energy for the HVAC Industry Why 13 SEER for Residential Equipment Figure 6-1: Residential and Commercial Energy Consumption in the U.S. 2004- 2008 Figure 6-2: Electrical System Energy Losses by Residential & Commercial Equipment, 2001-2005 (in trillion Btu) Measures Used to Achieve 13 SEER The Phasing Out of R-22 Refrigerants Table 6-1: EPA Timetable for the Hydrochlorofluorocarbon Phase-out by 2030 The Phasing in of R-410A Refrigerants Table 6-2: Manufacturers and their brands names for R-410A What HVAC Manufacturers are Doing Sensor and Control Systems Improve HVAC Operations HVAC for Leadership in Energy Efficiency and Design (LEED) Buildings Table 6-3: Leadership in Energy Efficiency and Design (LEED) Points Overcoming Challenges Impact of the 13 SEER on the HVAC Market Figure 6-3: National Association of Home Builders Remodeling Market Index, 2004-2009 Heating Equipment Requirements Other HVAC Requirements and Specifications The Efficiency Paradox - What Drives Standard Changes? Energy Policy Act of 2005 Added Spark to the HVAC Industry The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 offers HVAC Tax Incentives to Builders and Realtors The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 means Tax Credits Table 6-4: Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) Efficiency Ratings Table 6-5: Federal Tax Credits for HVAC Equipment for Homeowners, 2009 The Recovery Act Aims to Increase Building Energy Efficiency (BEC) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) to help States Qualify for State Energy Program Grants Impact of the Energy Policy Act 2005 on the HVAC Industry
  17. 17. Government Initiatives Replaced by Recovery ActTable 6-6: Local Government Initiated HVAC Programs in 2005 (NationalSummary)HVAC’s Tradeoff with the EnvironmentRefrigerants Used in HVAC Systems and Their Environmental EffectsTable 6-7: Ozone Depletion Potential and Global Warming Potentials ofRefrigerants (100-year Values)*Figure 6-4: Projected Consumption of R-22 Refrigerant in Air Conditioners &Heat Pumps (in thousand metric tons)*CO2 - The Next Generation Green RefrigerantIndoor Air Quality (IAQ) - A Growing MarketMeasures to Improve Indoor Air Quality in HomesThe Impact of the IAQ Trend on the HVAC MarketIAQ Standards: AINSI/ASHRAE Standards 62-200 and 55-2004The Market Opportunity in IAQWelcome to the Control ZoneCommunication Improvement Lead to Great Consumer ControlIntelligent Remote Control in the Home, by the Phone and Through the InternetOBIX: Networking HVACHVAC Industry Adopts the gbXML StandardHVAC - The Comfort MarketIntegrated Comfort Systems Grab AttentionHVAC Designs to Appeal to the Aesthetically Inclined ConsumersIndustry Enters the Quiet Comfort EraRising Prices Heat Up HVAC MarketFigure 6-5: Producer Price Index of Sheet Metal used Air Conditioning Ducts andStove Pipes, 2004-2009Figure 6-6: Producer Price Indices for Sheet Metal Used in Roof Ventilators,Louvers, & Dampers for HVAC, 2004-2009Figure 6-7: Producer Price Indices for Copper, Nickel, Lead and Zinc Mining,2004-2008Figure 6-8: Producer Price Indices for Air Conditioning & Heat TransferEquipment, 2004-2008Figure 6-9: Producer Price Indices for Air Conditioning & Heat TransferEquipment, January-September 2009Figure 6-10: Producer Price Indices for Unitary Air Conditioners, 2004-2008Figure 6-11: Producer Price Indices for Unitary Air Conditioners, January-September, 2009Unprecedented Increase in Cost of Raw MaterialsFigure 6-12: Producer Price Index for Cold Rolled Steel Sheet & Strip, Copper &Copper Base Alloy Pipe & Tube, and Aluminum Sheet and Strip, 2004-2008Figure 6-13: Producer Price Index for Cold Rolled Steel Sheet & Strip, January-September 2009Figure 6-14: Producer Price Index for Copper & Copper Base Alloy Pipe & Tube,January-September 2009
  18. 18. Figure 6-15: Producer Price Index for Aluminum Sheet & Strip, January- September, 2009 Soaring HVAC Component Prices Figure 6-16: Producer Price Index for Parts, Accessories & Components for Air Conditioning and Heat Transfer Equipment, 2004-2008 Figure 6-17: Producer Price Index for Parts, Accessories & Components for Air Conditioning and Heat Transfer Equipment, January-September 2009 Product Trends The Use of Thermal Expansion Valves (TXVs) Whole House Ventilation Systems Outdoor HVAC Systems HVAC Systems - An Architectural Misfit? Portable Air Conditioners The Future of HVAC Technology Geothermal HVAC Systems Table 6-8: Cost Comparison of Geothermal (GeoExchange System) and other HVAC Systems for a Home in St. George, Utah Underfloor Air Distribution Systems Table 6-9: Types of UFAD Systems Ductless Air Conditioners Solar Energy SystemsChapter 7: End User Overview Residential Use Builders Challenge and Net-Zero Homes The E-Scale, an Easy Measure of a Home’s Energy Efficiency Tax Credits The Benefits of Geothermal Heat Pumps and the Geothermal Technologies Program Air Conditioner Use in American Households Figure 7-1: Percentage of U.S. Households Owning Air Conditioning Units Figure 7-2: U.S. Residential Energy Consumption, 2004-2008 (in trillion Btu) Figure 7-3: U.S. Residential Energy Consumption, First Half of 2009 (in trillion Btu) Decreased Construction Leads to Fewer HVAC Installations Table 7-1: Residential HVAC System Utilization (in thousand housing units) Figure 7-4: U.S. Total Residential Construction, 2004-2008 (in million $) Figure 7-5: U.S. Total Residential Construction, January-June, 2009 (in million $) Consumption Characteristics of Residential Buildings Figure 7-6: Residential Building Primary Electric Energy Breakdown, 2005 (%) Figure 7-7: Households with Selected HVAC Appliances in 2005 (%) Figure 7-8: Type of Air Conditioning Equipment Used by U.S. Households, 2005 Characteristics of Residential HVAC Consumers Strong Economy Boosts HVAC Installation, Weak Economy Slows it Down Table 7-2: Consumer Price Index, 1999-2009 Figure 7-9: U.S. Residential HVAC Expenditures, 2001-2005 (in billion $)
  19. 19. Single-Family Detached Homes Use the Most EnergyTable 7-3: U.S. Residential Energy Consumption According to Housing Type (inmillion Btu)South and Southwest Greatest Users of Air ConditioningTable 7-4: Average Regional Expenditures for Households Having Electric AirConditioning, 2005 (in million $)HVAC Consumption According to Climatic ZonesTable 7-5: Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in U.S. Households Accordingto Climate Zone, 2005Table 7-6: Space Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households According toClimate Zone, 2005Type of Fuel Used For Residential Heating SystemsFigure 7-10: Type of Fuel Used for Heating Systems in Occupied Housing Units,2005 (%)Geothermal Heating Systems Grow in PopularityTable 7-7: Electricity Net Generation from Renewable Energy, 2003-2007 (inthousand kilowatt-hours)Remodeling Market and HVAC Retrofit InstallationsFigure 7-11: U.S Quarterly Expenditures for Maintenance, Repairs andImprovements, 2005-2007 (in billion $)The Remodeling Market Index has been in Sharp DeclineFigure 7-12: Remodeling Market Index, 2004-2009Residential HVAC Retrofitting Expenditures Continued to Increase DespiteRecessionFigure 7-13: U.S. Residential HVAC Retrofit Expenditures in Owner-OccupiedProperties, 2002-2007 (in million $)Non-Residential End UseTable 7-8: Commercial Sector Energy Consumption, 2003-2008 (trillion BTUs)Figure 7-14: U.S. Commercial Energy Consumption (in trillion Btu)The Push Toward Energy Conservation and Net-Zero BuildingsThe Building Technologies Program and the Impact of HVAC EquipmentNET-ZERO and GDP GrowthUpdating the Building EnvelopeThe Commercial Building Initiative and EnergyPlus SoftwareFigure 7-15: Percentage of U.S. Commercial Buildings With Cooling Systems(s),1999, 2003, 2007 (E)Figure 7-16: Percentage of U.S. Commercial Buildings with Heating Systems(s),1999, 2003, 2007 (E)U.S. Non-Residential Construction Continues to GrowFigure 7-17: U.S. Total Non-Residential Construction, 2003-2007 (in million $)Figure 7-18: U.S. Total Non-Residential Construction, January-June, 2009 (inmillion $)Table 7-9: U.S. Non-Residential Construction, by Type, 2004-2007 (in million $)Table 7-10: U.S. Non-Residential Construction, by Type, January-June 2009 (inmillion $)Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Buildings
  20. 20. Figure 7-19: Commercial Building Primary Energy Use Breakdown, 2005 (%) Space Heating Equipment Figure 7-20: Commercial Building Heating Equipment Use, 2005 (%) Cooling Equipment Figure 7-21: Commercial Building Cooling Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (%) Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Users Table 7-11: Commercial Buildings HVAC Consumption, by End Use, in 2005 (in trillion Btu) Educational Institutions Figure 7-22: U.S. School Buildings Heating Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E) (%) (More than one may apply) Figure 7-23: U.S. School Buildings Cooling Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (%) (More than one may apply) Food & Beverage Service Industry Figure 7-24: U.S. Food & Beverage Service Outlets Heating Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (%) (More than one may apply) Figure 7-25: U.S. Food & Beverage Service Outlets Cooling Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E) (%) (More than one may apply) Healthcare Facilities Figure 7-26: U.S. Healthcare Facilities Heating Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (%) (More than one may apply) Figure 7-27: U.S. Healthcare Facilities Cooling Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E) (%) (More than one may apply) Lodging Facilities Figure 7-28: Annual Sales in Hotel and Lodging, 2002-2007 (in $ million) Figure 7-29: U.S. Lodging Facilities Heating Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (%) (More than one may apply) Figure 7-30: U.S. Lodging Facilities Cooling Equipment Breakdown, 2005 (E) (%) (More than one may apply) Commercial HVAC Equipment Use by Geography Figure 7-31: U.S. Commercial Buildings HVAC Equipment Breakdown, by Census Region, 2005 (%) Energy Sources Used for Commercial HVAC Figure 7-32: Type of Fuel Used by Commercial Buildings for HVAC Equipment in the U.S., 2005 (%) Optimal HVAC Practices Integration Concepts Mechanical SystemsAvailable immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=2511497
  21. 21. US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004

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