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2.1 
Linear and 
Quadratic 
Functions and 
Modeling 
Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc.
What you’ll learn about 
 Polynomial Functions 
 Linear Functions and Their Graphs 
 Average Rate of Change 
 Linear C...
Polynomial Function 
Let n be a nonnegative integer and let a0 ,a1,a2 ,...,an1,an 
be real numbers with an  0. The funct...
Polynomial Functions of 
No and Low Degree 
Name Form Degree 
Zero Function f(x) = 0 Undefined 
Constant Function f(x) = a...
Example Finding an Equation of a 
Linear Function 
Write an equation for the linear function f 
such that f (1)  2 and f...
Example Finding an Equation of a 
Linear Function 
Write an equation for the linear function f 
such that f (1)  2 and f...
Average Rate of Change 
The average rate of change of a function 
y  f (x) between x  a and x  b, a  b, is 
f (b)  f ...
Constant Rate of Change Theorem 
A function defined on all real numbers is a linear 
function if and only if it has a cons...
Characterizing the Nature of 
a Linear Function 
Point of View Characterization 
Verbal polynomial of degree 1 
Algebraic ...
Properties of the 
Correlation Coefficient, r 
1. –1 ≤ r ≤ 1 
2. When r > 0, there is a positive linear 
correlation. 
3. ...
Linear Correlation 
Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 11
Regression Analysis 
1. Enter and plot the data (scatter plot). 
2. Find the regression model that fits the 
problem situa...
Example Transforming the Squaring 
Function 
Describe how to transform the graph of f (x)  x2 into the 
graph of f (x)  ...
Example Transforming the Squaring 
Function 
Describe how to transform the graph of f (x)  x2 into the 
graph of f (x)  ...
The Graph of f(x)=ax2 
Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 15
Vertex Form of a Quadratic Equation 
Any quadratic function f(x) = ax2 + bx + c, 
a ≠ 0, can be written in the vertex form...
Example Finding the Vertex and Axis 
of a Quadratic Function 
Use the vertex form of a quadratic function to find the 
ver...
Example Finding the Vertex and 
Axis of a Quadratic Function 
Use the vertex form of a quadratic function to find the 
ver...
Example Using Algebra to Describe 
the Graph of a Quadratic Function 
Use completing the square to describe the graph of 
...
Example Using Algebra to Describe 
the Graph of a Quadratic Function 
Use completing the square to describe the graph of 
...
Example Using Algebra to Describe 
the Graph of a Quadratic Function 
Use completing the square to describe the graph of 
...
Example Using Algebra to Describe 
the Graph of a Quadratic Function 
Use completing the square to describe the graph of 
...
Characterizing the Nature of 
a Quadratic Function 
Point of Characterization 
View 
Verbal polynomial of degree 2 
Algebr...
Vertical Free-Fall Motion 
The height s and vertical velocity v of an object in 
free fall are given by 
s(t )   
1 
2 
...
Quick Review 
1. Write an equation in slope-intercept form for a line 
with slope m  2 and y-intercept 10. 
2. Write an e...
Quick Review Solutions 
1. Write an equation in slope-intercept form for a line 
with slope m  2 and y-intercept 10. y  ...
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Unit 2.1

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Unit 2.1

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Unit 2.1

  1. 1. 2.1 Linear and Quadratic Functions and Modeling Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc.
  2. 2. What you’ll learn about  Polynomial Functions  Linear Functions and Their Graphs  Average Rate of Change  Linear Correlation and Modeling  Quadratic Functions and Their Graphs  Applications of Quadratic Functions … and why Many business and economic problems are modeled by linear functions. Quadratic and higher degree polynomial functions are used to model some manufacturing applications. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 2
  3. 3. Polynomial Function Let n be a nonnegative integer and let a0 ,a1,a2 ,...,an1,an be real numbers with an  0. The function given by f (x)  anxn  an1xn1  ...  a2x2  a1x  a0 is a polynomial function of degree n. The leading coefficient is an . The zero function f x 0 is a polynomial function. It has no degree and no leading coefficient. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 3
  4. 4. Polynomial Functions of No and Low Degree Name Form Degree Zero Function f(x) = 0 Undefined Constant Function f(x) = a (a ≠ 0) 0 Linear Function f(x) = ax + b (a ≠ 0) 1 Quadratic Function f(x) = ax2 + bx + c (a ≠ 0) 2 Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 4
  5. 5. Example Finding an Equation of a Linear Function Write an equation for the linear function f such that f (1)  2 and f (2)  3. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 5
  6. 6. Example Finding an Equation of a Linear Function Write an equation for the linear function f such that f (1)  2 and f (2)  3. The line contains the points (1,2) and (2,3). Find the slope: m  3 2 2 1  1 3 Use the point-slope formula and the point (2,3): y  y1  m(x  x1 ) y  3  1 3 x  2 f (x)  1 3 x  7 3 y  3  1 3 x  2 3 y  1 3 x  7 3 Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 6
  7. 7. Average Rate of Change The average rate of change of a function y  f (x) between x  a and x  b, a  b, is f (b)  f (a) b  a . Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 7
  8. 8. Constant Rate of Change Theorem A function defined on all real numbers is a linear function if and only if it has a constant nonzero average rate of change between any two points on its graph. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 8
  9. 9. Characterizing the Nature of a Linear Function Point of View Characterization Verbal polynomial of degree 1 Algebraic f(x) = mx + b (m≠0) Graphical slant line with slope m, y-intercept b Analytical function with constant nonzero rate of change m: f is increasing if m > 0, decreasing if m < 0; initial value of the function = f(0) = b Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 9
  10. 10. Properties of the Correlation Coefficient, r 1. –1 ≤ r ≤ 1 2. When r > 0, there is a positive linear correlation. 3. When r < 0, there is a negative linear correlation. 4. When |r| ≈ 1, there is a strong linear correlation. 5. When |r| ≈ 0, there is weak or no linear correlation. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 10
  11. 11. Linear Correlation Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 11
  12. 12. Regression Analysis 1. Enter and plot the data (scatter plot). 2. Find the regression model that fits the problem situation. 3. Superimpose the graph of the regression model on the scatter plot, and observe the fit. 4. Use the regression model to make the predictions called for in the problem. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 12
  13. 13. Example Transforming the Squaring Function Describe how to transform the graph of f (x)  x2 into the graph of f (x)  2x  22  3. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 13
  14. 14. Example Transforming the Squaring Function Describe how to transform the graph of f (x)  x2 into the graph of f (x)  2x  22  3. The graph of f (x)  2x  22  3 is obtained by vertically stretching the graph of f (x)  x2 by a factor of 2 and translating the resulting graph 2 units right and 3 units up. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 14
  15. 15. The Graph of f(x)=ax2 Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 15
  16. 16. Vertex Form of a Quadratic Equation Any quadratic function f(x) = ax2 + bx + c, a ≠ 0, can be written in the vertex form f(x) = a(x – h)2 + k The graph of f is a parabola with vertex (h, k) and axis x = h, where h = –b/(2a) and k = c – ah2. If a > 0, the parabola opens upward, and if a < 0, it opens downward. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 16
  17. 17. Example Finding the Vertex and Axis of a Quadratic Function Use the vertex form of a quadratic function to find the vertex and axis of the graph of f (x)  2x2  8x 11. Rewrite the equation in vertex form. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 17
  18. 18. Example Finding the Vertex and Axis of a Quadratic Function Use the vertex form of a quadratic function to find the vertex and axis of the graph of f (x)  2x2  8x 11. Rewrite the equation in vertex form. The standard polynomial form of f is f (x)  2x2  8x 11; a  2, b  8, c  11, and the coordinates of the vertex are h   b 2a  8 4  2 and k  f (h)  f (2)  2(2)2  8(2) 11  3. The equation of the axis is x  2, the vertex is (2,3), and the vertex form of f is f (x)  2(x  2)2  3. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 18
  19. 19. Example Using Algebra to Describe the Graph of a Quadratic Function Use completing the square to describe the graph of f (x)  2x2  8x 11. Support your answer graphically. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 19
  20. 20. Example Using Algebra to Describe the Graph of a Quadratic Function Use completing the square to describe the graph of f (x)  4x2 12x  8. Support your answer graphically. f (x)  4x2 12x  8  4x2  3x 8  4 x2   3x      8 2   4 x2  3x  3 2       2  3 2             8 Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 20
  21. 21. Example Using Algebra to Describe the Graph of a Quadratic Function Use completing the square to describe the graph of f (x)  4x2 12x  8. Support your answer graphically.   4 x2  3x  9 4       4   9 4      8   4 x  3 2      2 1 Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 21
  22. 22. Example Using Algebra to Describe the Graph of a Quadratic Function Use completing the square to describe the graph of f (x)  4x2 12x  8. Support your answer graphically. The graph of f is a downward-opening parabola with vertex (3/2, 1) and axis of symmetry x = 3/2. The x-intercepts are at x = 1 and x = 2. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 22
  23. 23. Characterizing the Nature of a Quadratic Function Point of Characterization View Verbal polynomial of degree 2 Algebraic f(x) = ax2 + bx + c or f(x) = a(x – h)2 + k (a ≠ 0) Graphical parabola with vertex (h, k) and axis x = k; opens upward if a > 0, opens downward if a < 0; initial value = y-intercept = f(0) = c; x-intercepts  b  b2  4ac 2a Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 23
  24. 24. Vertical Free-Fall Motion The height s and vertical velocity v of an object in free fall are given by s(t )   1 2 gt 2  v0t  s0 and v(t )  gt  v0 , where t is time (in seconds), g  32 ft/sec2  9.8 m/sec2 is the acceleration due to gravity, v0 is the initial vertical velocity of the object, and s0 is its initial height. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 24
  25. 25. Quick Review 1. Write an equation in slope-intercept form for a line with slope m  2 and y-intercept 10. 2. Write an equation for the line containing the points (  2,3) and (3,4). 3. Expand (x  6)2 . 4. Expand (2x  3)2 . 5. Factor 2x2  8x  8. Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 25
  26. 26. Quick Review Solutions 1. Write an equation in slope-intercept form for a line with slope m  2 and y-intercept 10. y  2x 10 2. Write an equation for the line containing the points (  2,3) and (3,4). y  4  1 5 x  3 3. Expand (x  6)2 . x2 12x  36 4. Expand (2x  3)2 . 4x2 12x  9 5. Factor 2x2  8x  8. 2x  22 Copyright © 2011 Pearson, Inc. Slide 2.1 - 26

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