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Project Stakeholder Engagement

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Project stakeholder engagement at the University of Edinburgh

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Project Stakeholder Engagement

  1. 1. Effective Stakeholder Engagement Mark Ritchie and Rhian Davies IS Applications Division
  2. 2. Stakeholder Engagement • What are stakeholders? • Why do stakeholders matter? • Stakeholder Engagement Process –Identification –Assessment –Planning Communication • Stakeholder Engagement in practice
  3. 3. “a key individual or group of people that are impacted by the project or are critical to the success of the project” Stakeholder Definition
  4. 4. Project Communication • Passive • One way • Reliant on newsletters, mail shots and static web sites If your approach to informing stakeholder is this is unlikely to be result in happy customers or successful projects!
  5. 5. 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Poor Communications Inadequate Planning Unrealistic Budget or Schedule Poorly Defined Requirements or Success Criteria Lack of Stakeholder Buy In Poor Risk Management Lack of Change Control Why Do Projects Fail? Source: PMI (2007)
  6. 6. Why Engage Stakeholders? • maximise the likelihood of project success • win and maintain support from the most influential stakeholders • encourage wider and more positive cooperation with your project • anticipate stakeholder reaction and build into the plan actions to win support • improve quality of project deliverables
  7. 7. Identify Stakeholders Plan Communication Engage Stakeholders Stakeholder Assessment  Identify stakeholder groups  Identify individual stakeholders representatives  Create initial stakeholder list  Create Stakeholder Communications Planning Sheet  Identify engagement activities  Develop detailed engagement plans  Maintain plan to support ongoing engagement activities  Execute stakeholder communication plan  Monitor progress  Conduct high-level stakeholder assessment  Prioritise stakeholders  Develop stakeholder map  Stakeholder List  Stakeholder Communications Planning Sheet  Stakeholder Communications Plan  Updated Stakeholder Communication Plan  Communication and engagement activities  Feedback mechanisms implemented  Stakeholder Map  Engagement Grid  Updated Stakeholder List Stakeholder Engagement Process OutputsOutputs TasksTasks
  8. 8. Who are our stakeholders? Students Alumni Prospective Students Academic Staff Administrative Staff Future Staff Recruits Senior University Executives Project Team Colleagues Human Resources Trade Unions Procurement Disability Office Records Management Communications and Marketing Finance IT/Customer Support Staff Suppliers Government Agencies General Public Press and Media Press and Media Local Community
  9. 9. Identifying Stakeholders • consider all areas of the project’s influence • consider the entire project lifecycle • be inclusive and diverse • use past stakeholder information as a guide • Include relevant interests groups e.g. Finance, HR or Procurement • engage empowered representatives
  10. 10. Stakeholder Map New Email Service Business Testers Business Analyst: David Watters Business Assurance: Stephen Smith Business Reps (TBC): Units with shared, delegated and real time diary needs e.g. Careers or Accommodation Services. Local College integration experts. Non central service units e.g. Physics. Business Testers Business Analyst: David Watters Business Assurance: Stephen Smith Business Reps (TBC): Units with shared, delegated and real time diary needs e.g. Careers or Accommodation Services. Local College integration experts. Non central service units e.g. Physics. Project Board Convenor: Bruce Nelson Project Board Convenor: Bruce Nelson User Support Lead Migration coordinators, Service Desk helpline & testers: Neil Bruce Keith Nicol Local computing Officers User Support Lead Migration coordinators, Service Desk helpline & testers: Neil Bruce Keith Nicol Local computing Officers External Suppliers and Procurement Procurement Office Microsoft Vodophone/02 External Suppliers and Procurement Procurement Office Microsoft Vodophone/02 Client Delivery Client Config. for all OS’s: Hugh Brown Windows Desktop/CAB: Kenneth McDonald Client Delivery Client Config. for all OS’s: Hugh Brown Windows Desktop/CAB: Kenneth McDonald MS Exchange (2000/2007) John McFarlane, David Foggo MS Exchange (2000/2007) John McFarlane, David Foggo Infrastructure Technical Design: Iain Fiddes, Pride Shoniwa, Garry Scobie, Martin Cassels, Fiona Lawson, Apollon Koutlidis Mail relay, staffmail & SMS: Scott Larnach Infrastructure Technical Design: Iain Fiddes, Pride Shoniwa, Garry Scobie, Martin Cassels, Fiona Lawson, Apollon Koutlidis Mail relay, staffmail & SMS: Scott Larnach Student Groups Elected Student VP EUSA Student Groups Elected Student VP EUSA UoE Staff Incl. PGR’s, ‘staff like’ visitors, and staff from each College and support Group. UoE Staff Incl. PGR’s, ‘staff like’ visitors, and staff from each College and support Group. Project Project Sponsor: Jeff Haywood Business Owner: Mark Wetton Project Manager: Susan McKeown Service Manager: Stephen Smith Programme Manager: Maurice Franceschi Project Project Sponsor: Jeff Haywood Business Owner: Mark Wetton Project Manager: Susan McKeown Service Manager: Stephen Smith Programme Manager: Maurice Franceschi
  11. 11. Prioritising Stakeholders • High Power/High Interest – Fully engage with – Make greatest efforts to satisfy • High Power/Less Interest – Keep satisfied • Low Power/High Interest – Keep informed – Leverage their interest • Low Power/Low Interest – Monitor e.g for changes as project progresses
  12. 12. Understanding Stakeholders • Talk directly - don’t rely on email • Ask them their opinions • Draw out emotional responses • Help them see next steps and ultimate goal • Explain the benefits
  13. 13. Understanding Stakeholders • Have they a financial or other interest? • What motivates them most? • Is their current opinion positive or negative? • Who influences them and who do they influence? • At what stage will they be most impacted? • Can they assist with project design or reduce costs? • What information do they want from you? • How can you win their support or manage their opposition?
  14. 14. Key Concerns Record the stakeholder’s most important concerns about the project. These may be positive drivers for why the stakeholder wants the project to succeed or perceived negative impacts to be minimised or avoided Communications Approach Monitor, Keep Informed, Keep Satisfied or Manage Closely Required Level of Support High, Medium or Low Required Action Record any actions that you need the stakeholder to take e.g. to publicly champion the project or carry out specific tasks. Sign Off Confirm whether the stakeholder will participate in sign off reviews and has influence over whether the project is allowed to proceed. Key Messages Record any messages you will need to convey to the stakeholder to maintain there support. Typically messages will identify benefits to the stakeholder or focus on their particular concerns. Communications Planning Sheet
  15. 15. Planning Communication • Focus on issues that matter • Choose the right format and frequency • Ensure adequate resources • Provide feedback loops • Be ready to act - not just PR • Listen – especially to critics • Be open and build trust
  16. 16. Stakeholder Group Key Concerns Approach Required Support Required Actions Project Sponsor Exchange 2007 solution to be implemented as quickly as possible to ease current staff dissatisfaction and relieve burden on support staff. Satisfy Medium To publicly champion the project and provide funding for costs. UoE staff New solution needed as quickly as possible due to problems with current system. Use across different platforms, especially Linux and mobile devices, not just Blackberry. Minimise user effort required to move to new solution. Satisfy High To provide user requirements to inform the project and ensure the best solution is delivered. To provide timely feedback during testing and immediately following deployment. Microsoft Solution meets the requirements and enhance Microsoft's reputation. Manage Closely High Advise and participate in the analysis, design and delivery. Students How the move will affect students ability to book time with staff Inform Low None IS ITI Infrastructure Storage and back-up implications. Mail relay implications. Impact on Exchange architecture. Networking. M M To actively participate in the project. Communications Planning Sheet (Example)
  17. 17. Identify Stakeholders Plan Stakeholder Communication Engage Stakeholders KeyDelive Stakeholder Assessment KeyActivities  Identify stakeholder groups  Identify individual stakeholders representatives for each groups  Create initial stakeholder list  Create Stakeholder Communications Planning Sheet  Identify engagement activities  Develop detailed engagement plans and timelines  Maintain plan to support ongoing engagement activities  Execute stakeholder communication plan  Regular checks to monitor progress  Conduct high-level stakeholder assessment  Prioritise stakeholders for engagement  Develop stakeholder map  Stakeholder List  Stakeholder Communications Planning Sheet  Stakeholder Communications Plan  Updated Stakeholder Communication Plan  Communication and engagement activities  Feedback mechanisms implemented  Stakeholder Map  Engagement Grid  Updated Stakeholder List Stakeholder Engagement Process
  18. 18. Stakeholder Engagement in Practice Rhian Davies IS Applications Division
  19. 19. eProcurement Scotland • Background • Identifying stakeholders • Assessing stakeholders • Communicating with stakeholders • Challenges • Outcome
  20. 20. Background • Online marketplace for goods and services • National eProcurement programme run by the Scottish Government • Used in central government, local government, NHS, higher and further education
  21. 21. Identifying Stakeholders Asked an expert Previous experience Brainstorming Finance Senior Management Scottish Government Users APUC Suppliers Capgemini Procurement Elcom Cedar (Finance System provider)
  22. 22. Assessing Stakeholders • Key stakeholders – Users – Suppliers – Software provider – Senior management – Delivery partners (Capgemini and APUC)
  23. 23. Communication • Needed to actively engage key stakeholders – Established a communication strategy • Used a variety of techniques: – Workshops – One to one meetings – Information events – Dedicated staff e.g. supplier management
  24. 24. Challenges – Delivery Partners • Who… – Delivery partners • What… – Wanted basic implementation – UoE wanted to add more value • How… – Set expectations at start of project – Maintained focus on added value
  25. 25. Challenges - Suppliers • What… – Lack of interest – Why fix what isn’t broken? • How… – Dedicated team member – Regular updates – Work with other institutions
  26. 26. Challenges - Users • What… – needed to maintain interest despite delays • How… – Communication – Focus on benefits
  27. 27. Challenges – Software Provider • What… – Had to communicate through 3rd party • How… – Established weekly conference calls – Highlighted issues to 3rd party senior management
  28. 28. Outcome • Successful rollout • Obtained value added solution – Integration with the Finance system – Accessed via EASE single sign on • Positive feedback from users post implementation

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