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Geneticall modified crops jessica schacherer

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Geneticall modified crops jessica schacherer

  1. 1. GeneticallyModified Crops Jessica Schacherer
  2. 2. What are Genetically Modified Crops?  GM plants created using GMOs  GMOs  Organisms in which DNA has been altered in a way not naturally occurring  “modern biotechnology”  “gene technology”  Allows selected individual genes to be transferred from one organism to another or between non-related species
  3. 3. Benefits of GM Crop Use  Resistance to herbicides  Insect resistance  Decrease use of pesticides  Drought resistance  Addition of vitamins & nutrients  Golden Rice – Vitamin A  Bt cotton in India  Crop yields increased by 60%  Use in United States by 2009/2010  Soybeans 93%  Cotton 93%  Corn 86%  Sugar Beet 95%
  4. 4. GM Crop Global Uses World hunger issue  Supply more food to starving nations  Poverty issue  Conflict with current  Allow for better crop yield in regulations in Africa poor countries  Promote economic growth  Export products  Financially independent  Conflict with current regulations
  5. 5. Allergenicity Gene Transfer Out CrossingConcerns
  6. 6. Allergenicity •Transfer from commonly allergenic foods discouraged •Unless protein product proven safe •Protocols for tests by WHO •No allergic effects foundConcerns currently in GM foods
  7. 7. Gene Transfer •Transfer from GM foods to human cells •Via intestinal tract •Antibiotic resistant genes •Probability low •Negative health effects?Concerns
  8. 8. Out Crossing •Movement of genes from GM plants to wild species •Mixing of seeds, indirect effect on food safety & security Maize product in US •Ecological relationshipsConcerns
  9. 9. What happens whenyou combine….
  10. 10. Grapples
  11. 11. What about…
  12. 12. Lematos
  13. 13. What about…
  14. 14. Plumcots
  15. 15. Designer Fruit Example: Peach + Nectarine  “Natural cross hybrid”  Peach: passes on its taste  Combinations of different fruits to  Nectarine: easy to eat, no fuzz produce novel ones on skin  None naturally occurring  Genetically different than either parent  Created to enhance characteristics from other species  Sold as specialty items  New fruit market  .50 cents to $1.00 more  Methods in field, not lab  Still genetically modified food?  Controversy avoided
  16. 16. Howcouldlettucetreatdiabetes?
  17. 17. Genetically Modified Lettuce Professor Henry Daniell of the University of Central Florida Genetically engineered tobacco plants with insulin gene  Administered to diabetic mice  Restored normal blood and urine sugar levels  Proposed using lettuce instead Prevent diabetes before symptoms appear Treat disease is later stages
  18. 18. Genetically Modified Lettuce  20.8 million children and adults in US  7% of population  Type 1 or 2 diabetes  Double by 2025  $79.7 billion out of $645 billion federally spent treating diabetes  NIH provided $2 million in funding of study  Affect millions worldwide
  19. 19. Do you considerhybrid fruit to be GM foods?
  20. 20. Do you thinkproduction of these fruits is harmful orhelpful with regards to: society? the environment? the economy?
  21. 21. How do you feelabout the use of GM lettuce totreat diabetes?
  22. 22. Questions?
  23. 23. References http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/ 070730111638.htm http://webecoist.com/2009/02/19/genetically- modified-fruits-vegetables/ http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/biot ech/20questions/en/ http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/africa_policy_o n_genetically_modified_organisms_gmo_and_ genetically_engineered_ge_foods http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142405311 1904900904576552543026705926.html#print Mode%3D%26project%3DFRUIT090711%26a rticleTabs%3Dinteractive

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