Standard Business Etiquette - Study Notes

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The rules of proper business etiquette have been changing. In a flat organizational structure, the need for appropriate behavior especially crucial, particularly if
you're looking to advance your career. How do you maintain your private "space" when you sit in one of a dozen cubicles? How should you address your peers and
superiors, and what's the proper attire for today's corporate culture? Learn how to conduct yourself in the standard business environment with poise and confidence.

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Standard Business Etiquette - Study Notes

  1. 1. Standard Business Etiquette Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge
  2. 2. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 2 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e Table of Contents References.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3 A. BUSINESS INTRODUCTIONS AND HANDSHAKES ........................................................................................................................................5 Making proper business introductions.......................................................................................................................................................................5 Shaking hands properly .....................................................................................................................................................................................................6 B. THE THREE C'S OF GOOD COMMUNICATION .............................................................................................................................................8 1. Clarity.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................8 2. Cooperation.........................................................................................................................................................................................................................9 3. Courtesy................................................................................................................................................................................................................................9 C. THE ETIQUETTE OF BUSINESS ATTIRE....................................................................................................................................................11 1. What's the dominant style of dress at my company?................................................................................................................................... 11 2. What will my clothing choices say to co-workers? ....................................................................................................................................... 12 3. What risks am I willing to take? ............................................................................................................................................................................. 13 D. RULES OF WORK SPACE ETIQUETTE........................................................................................................................................................15 E. THE ETIQUETTE OF OFFERING OPINIONS...............................................................................................................................................17 1. Who will hear your opinion?.................................................................................................................................................................................... 17 2. Does your opinion stay within bounds?............................................................................................................................................................. 18 3. Is the language of the criticism or compliment appropriate?.................................................................................................................. 18 F. THE CORRECT ETIQUETTE FOR HANDLING CONFLICTS........................................................................................................................19 1. State a clear point of view ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 19 2. Explore what's happening in the conflict........................................................................................................................................................... 19 3. Propose a collaboration.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 19 G. THE ETIQUETTE OF OFFICE ROMANCES..................................................................................................................................................21 Starting a relationship with someone from the office...................................................................................................................................... 21 Dating someone from the office .................................................................................................................................................................................. 22 When the relationship dissolves................................................................................................................................................................................. 23 H. THE NEW RULES FOR BUSINESS CHIVALRY............................................................................................................................................24 Chivalry for the 21st century........................................................................................................................................................................................ 24 Chivalry you'd best forget.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 24 How to respond to chivalry........................................................................................................................................................................................... 25 I. TWO COMPANY DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES ....................................................................................................................................26 J. ETIQUETTE AND THE AUTHORITY TO LEAD............................................................................................................................................28 K. ANNEXES: .....................................................................................................................................................................................................30 Glossary................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 30 L. GLOSSARY .....................................................................................................................................................................................................31
  3. 3. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 3 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e References The Magic of Conflict, Crum, Thomas F., Simon and Schuster, How to Make Meetings Work, Doyle, Michael, and David Straus, Berkley Books, The Etiquette Advantage in Business, Post, Peggy and Peter, Harper Collins, Business Etiquette: 101 Ways to Conduct Business with Charm and Savvy, Sabath, Ann Marie, Career Press, Executive Etiquette in the New Workplace, Stewart, Marjabelle Young, and Marian Faux, St. Martin's Griffin, Company Manners, Wyse, Lois, Crown Trade Paperbacks,
  4. 4. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 4 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e Standard Business Etiquette A. Business Introductions and Handshakes B. The Three C's of Good Communication C. The Etiquette of Business Attire D. Rules of Work Space Etiquette E. The Etiquette of Offering Opinions F. The Correct Etiquette for Handling Conflicts G. The Etiquette of Office Romances H. The New Rules for Business Chivalry I. Two Company Decision-making Processes J. Etiquette and the Authority to Lead
  5. 5. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 5 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e A. Business Introductions and Handshakes What do most successful business relationships have in common? They begin exactly the same way – with a proper introduction and a handshake. To ensure these important initial steps in a business relationship are conducted properly, you should be aware of some of the basic points of business etiquette. Details about introductions and proper handshakes are provided in this chapter. Making proper business introductions Many business people, even those with years of experience, feel uncomfortable making business introductions. Those few moments are filled with uncertainty. Who speaks first? What's the right thing to say? To make proper introductions, keep the following points in mind:  Generally, when introducing yourself to someone else, give your first and last name. Don't call yourself "Ms. Mitchell." Although titles such as "Mr." or "Ms." are signs of respect, you may give them to others, but not to yourself.
  6. 6. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 6 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e  Next add a little information about yourself or your job. That helps start the conversation.  When you first meet someone else, refer to that person by his or her title and last name – for example, "Mr. Jones" or "Ms. Green" – until the other person invites you to use his or her first name.  Once you've been introduced to someone, make a point to repeat the other person's name right away. That helps you to remember the name and check correct pronunciation. In some situations, you're expected to introduce yourself. In others, a third party – maybe you – will introduce two people to each other. But whose name do you mention first? Who is introduced to whom? Business etiquette resembles military protocol in many ways, so a person of lesser rank is always presented to a person of higher rank. How do you judge rank in a business setting? Any CEO will tell you that no one outranks your customer. So always mention the customer's name first, and then present the other person by first and last name. Within the company, rank is determined by the organization chart. A president outranks a vice president, and so forth. If you're introducing two people of similar business rank, treat the older person, or the person who has been with the company longest, as higher ranking. If you can't decide who has seniority with any of these rules, here's a last resort: Give higher rank to the person with whom you're least familiar. Shaking hands properly Many business relationships are started – and sealed – through another important business ritual. Most business professionals still rely on a firm, sincere handshake as a sign of good will. Many still see it as the highest form of agreement.
  7. 7. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 7 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e What's there to know about shaking hands? It seems like a simple thing to do. In a business setting, however, there are some important guidelines to follow. Most important of all, relax. A handshake is supposed to be a friendly gesture. Begin the handshake as introductions are ending. Make sure your hand isn't damp or sweaty. Quickly wipe your palm on your clothing’s pockets if necessary. Stand close enough so you reach the other person's hand while maintaining a slight bend at the elbow. Grip the other person's hand firmly, but without squeezing. Make eye contact and smile. Continue the handshake for two or three seconds. Remember, the introduction and the handshake are the critical first steps in any business relationship. By knowing the proper business etiquette for business introductions and handshakes, and following the points described above, you can ensure that all your business relationships starts off positively.
  8. 8. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 8 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e B. The Three C's of Good Communication The CEO asked the DVPs to estimate the ROI on the M and A proposal. Now, can you decipher that code? The chief executive officer (the CEO) asked the division vice presidents (the DVPs) to estimate the return-on-investment (or ROI) on the merger and acquisition (M and A) proposal. Many business people like to pepper their speaking with too many TLAs – Three-Letter Abbreviations – and other insider jargon. That's one of the ways people violate the rules of etiquette for good communication. When speaking to others on the job, you should follow proper business etiquette. To do this, keep the "three C's" of etiquette in mind. Details about these three rules of business etiquette are provided in what follows. 1. Clarity The first of the three C's is Clarity. Clear, concise communication prevents misunderstandings and gives people the information they need to work more efficiently. Three obstacles to clarity in speaking are  using jargon, abbreviations, or slang  failing to come to the point quickly  clouding the issue with ambiguous statements
  9. 9. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 9 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e 2. Cooperation The second of the three C's is Cooperation. Business is a team activity, so don't dominate the conversation. Give other people a chance to fully express themselves. Here are three ways to build cooperation into your conversations:  Ask questions if you don't understand what someone says, or if you disagree. Don't object too quickly.  Pause occasionally while you're talking to add emphasis to your point and to allow others to speak without interrupting.  Don't interrupt, even when you have an important point to make. 3. Courtesy The third of the three C's is Courtesy. Business isn't always calm or calculated. Even senior managers can become emotional under pressure. But angry words are not easily forgotten or forgiven. No matter how strongly you feel about a discussion, never shout at anyone. People listen to you more closely when you lower your voice than when you raise it.
  10. 10. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 10 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e Don't use profanity in your conversations as many individuals find it unacceptable. Even mild profanity can be offensive to some. Similarly, any kind of personal observation about your co-workers – even compliments – can cause problems. If you want to pay someone a compliment, say something about the person's work, not his or her physical appearance. The etiquette you use to speak to co-workers isn't complicated, but these simple rules are frequently forgotten. By keeping the three C's in mind – clarity, cooperation, and courtesy – you can communicate more effectively and work more harmoniously with your colleagues.
  11. 11. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 11 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e C. The Etiquette of Business Attire The clothes you wear in the workplace are as much a part of business etiquette as the words you say or the actions you take. That's why it's important to carefully consider what you wear on the job. Your choice of clothing can send subtle but clear messages that reinforce the positive – or negative – impressions of others. When making decisions about how to dress on the job, you can ask yourself three important questions. These are treated in the following points. 1. What's the dominant style of dress at my company? The first question you should consider is about your company's culture. The number of businesses that allowed workers to dress casually – at least part of the time – increased sharply in the last while. But different companies have different ideas about what's appropriate and what's too casual. Although some companies issue a written dress code, every company has an unwritten code that determines what's expected from employees.
  12. 12. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 12 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e Generally, there are four styles of attire appropriate in companies. They are, from most formal to least formal, traditional, professional, collegiate, and casual. Traditional business attire includes dark wool or wool-blend suits for men, and suits or dresses for women. Professional attire includes blazers, skirts, and dressy blouses for women, and sport coats and ties for men. The collegiate style includes khakis, denim shirts, casual jackets, and no ties, while the casual style usually includes jeans, t-shirts, and sneakers. Which style is most appropriate for your company? 2. What will my clothing choices say to co-workers? This doesn't mean all your clothing choices have to reflect your company's style instead of your own. But it's important to recognize how your choices signal your attitudes to those around you.
  13. 13. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 13 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e Different people you work with will interpret your clothing choices in different ways. Think about the signals your personal style sends. Does your clothing say you're one of the team, upwardly mobile, or a unique individual? 3. What risks am I willing to take? No matter what image you choose, there's always a risk that someone you work with will be uncomfortable with your clothing choices. So the third question to ask reflects your goals. For example, if you're a manager who wants to get ahead, you may have to dress a little better than the rank and file to stand out from the crowd. If you want to stay in your current position for quite a while, you may decide to dress casually, like most of your co-workers. And what if your personal preferences are vastly different from the prevailing style at the company? Shouldn't you express your individuality and dress the way you want? Well, a few eccentric geniuses and artistic visionaries can get away with ignoring the etiquette of business attire. Everyone else, though, should carefully consider the impact of their decisions.
  14. 14. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 14 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e Asking yourself these three important questions about clothing etiquette doesn't mean you can't express your individual style. But your answers to these questions will help you recognize the impact of your decisions on the people you work with. By asking yourself these three questions and carefully evaluating the clothes you wear on the job, you'll be meeting the requirements of business etiquette established by your company.
  15. 15. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 15 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e D. Rules of Work Space Etiquette Working together in an office requires a delicate balance. People must be close together to collaborate, but to be productive, people need a little elbowroom to call their own. To ensure you respect everyone's personal space, you can follow five basic rules when you enter someone's cubicle or work space: 1. Knock to announce your presence – A cubicle may not have a door or walls that reach the ceiling, but it's still an office. Therefore, the first rule of work space etiquette is to knock or announce your presence. 2. Ask permission to enter – Don't just barge into the cubicle or work space, since the person you're visiting may not want interruptions. Be sure to first ask permission to enter. 3. Physically enter a cubicle or office to begin a conversation – Some people avoid entering a cubicle at all. They just peer over the top of the wall to speak to the person inside. That's like shouting to someone in an office from the hallway. When you fail to enter the work space physically, it emphasizes the other person's lack of privacy, makes a noisy environment even noisier, and tells people it's acceptable to treat you with the same lack of respect. 4. If the person you're visiting is busy, leave and try again later – Do you ever have the feeling you're being watched? That's how many people feel when others loiter outside their work space until a phone call or meeting is completed. Avoid "loitering" by following this fourth rule of work space etiquette. 5. Don't handle another person's work-related materials or personal belongings – Many people spend up to a third of their days in their work spaces, so they often put pictures, mementos, toys, trophies, and other objects on display. The things people display in their offices often have a great deal of personal and sentimental value. Don't assume you may handle or examine them. The same is true for work-related papers and tools, such as
  16. 16. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 16 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e computers. Don't handle other people's work-related materials or machines unless you're specifically invited to do so. Now you know how to avoid intruding on someone else's work space. But what do you do when someone intrudes on you? Well, you should handle the situation with tact, of course. Keep in mind that ignoring people or pretending to be busy won't make them go away. Instead, always greet people who come into your cubicle. A simple "hello" is enough. Sometimes that's all that's needed to get people to say what they have to say and move on. Don't try to block the interruption. Go along with it – briefly. Once you learn the reason for the interruption and agree on its importance, you can assert your priority. This is your chance to tell someone if you have urgent work you must attend to immediately. Finally, end the interruption and get back to work. You may want to offer an alternative time when you can discuss the other matter more fully. These simple rules of work space etiquette may seem unnecessary in an informal atmosphere, but observing other people's need for privacy – and knowing how to protect the privacy of your own cubicle or work space – can keep small conflicts from becoming major battles.
  17. 17. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 17 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e E. The Etiquette of Offering Opinions Everyone is entitled to an opinion. So why aren't people more receptive when someone offers to give them one? Giving your opinion can be like giving a gift. Both are welcome as long as they're sincere, thoughtful, and packaged nicely. However, either type of opinion – a compliment or a criticism – can damage a business relationship if it's awkwardly offered. So you should be cautious when offering both positive and negative opinions. Fortunately, the etiquette of offering opinions is the same for both compliments and criticism. To ensure you're following this etiquette, you can ask yourself three questions. 1. Who will hear your opinion? The first thing to consider when you're offering an opinion is who will hear it. Your opinion can lose its punch if you express it to too many or too few people. If you must deliver a criticism, do what you can to limit the audience to those who need to hear it. No one likes to have his or her errors pointed out in public.
  18. 18. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 18 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e Alternatively, compliments boost the confidence and the image of the person being complimented. So compliments work better when they're offered in front of a wide audience. 2. Does your opinion stay within bounds? The next thing to consider when you're offering your opinion is whether your opinion stays in bounds. An opinion strays out of bounds when it's too broad or off the subject. It's in bounds when it is specific and focused on the topic at hand. In general, compliments and criticisms that are in bounds focus on specific acts or specific results. People who offer these opinions don't make generalizations about the listener's capabilities in other situations. 3. Is the language of the criticism or compliment appropriate? The third question to consider when offering an opinion is whether the language of the criticism or compliment is appropriate. Understated language steals impact from your message. Overstated language sounds exaggerated and makes your opinion less credible. Moderate language is clear and honest and lends both impact and credibility to your message. Will people always accept your opinions if you follow these three guidelines? Probably not. But using correct etiquette will help prevent reactions you didn't expect – and help ensure that your opinions are received in the spirit in which they are intended.
  19. 19. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 19 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e F. The Correct Etiquette for Handling Conflicts When people work together, conflicts are inevitable. Some company cultures tolerate more conflict than others. But in all cultures, resolving conflicts is the only way to stay productive and efficient. It's up to you to determine whether a conflict remains a small disagreement or erupts into an all-out duel. That's why it's important to be aware of the correct etiquette for handling conflicts. To ensure you're following the correct etiquette, you can follow the three steps described below to work through conflicts. 1. State a clear point of view The first step in working through a conflict is to state a clear point of view. Choose your words carefully. That way you can make your position clear without escalating the disagreement. When you're discussing your own point of view, avoid using the word you. For example, don't say, "You're always late completing your assignments." Instead, explain your point of view using the word I. You could say, "I'm frustrated when I don't have the information I need to do my work." 2. Explore what's happening in the conflict After both people in a conflict have clearly stated their points of view, the source of the conflict becomes more apparent. The source of the problem usually falls into one of four categories:  Some conflicts arise because people are working from different sets of facts.  Conflicts are bound to happen when people who are working together have different goals.  Conflicts can happen when two people share a goal but disagree about the best way to get there.  Sometimes people agree on a goal as well as the best way to achieve it. However, conflicts can still happen if people have different priorities. 3. Propose a collaboration After you've clarified the source of the conflict, you should identify common interests. By offering to collaborate in working toward common interests, the conflict can be minimized. You're also building a more cooperative relationship.
  20. 20. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 20 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e If the other person presents a strong case, surrender is an option. But in truth, you'll feel defeated and resentful. If you defer to others in all conflicts, you'll be less effective getting your own work done. And if you resist making any concessions at all, you might get what you want – this time. But defeating every opponent is time-consuming and creates hard feelings. You won't win any friends this way. That's why collaboration is the best way to resolve conflict. Workplace conflicts are often complicated. You won't solve them all with one simple formula. But you can keep many small problems from becoming big ones by following the correct etiquette for handling conflicts.
  21. 21. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 21 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e G. The Etiquette of Office Romances Office romances have become a fact of office life in the contemporary business world. With more women in the work force than ever before, and with co-workers sharing the same space 8, 10, or 12 hours a day, mutual attractions are bound to develop. If you find yourself in a romantic situation you can't resist, you should be aware of some common- sense yet oft-violated rules. Details about the etiquette of office romances are provided here. Starting a relationship with someone from the office The first step in any romance can be tricky, but it's much more complicated when the person who is the object of your affection works in the same office with you. You'd like to ask the other person out, and there's no policy at your company that forbids co-worker dating, yet you're unsure of how to proceed. Would discreet flirting, just to get a feel for the situation, be tacky? What about a more direct approach? It's best to put off any move until you know the person. Once you do, it may be possible to predict the person's response, which could save both of you some discomfort. But if you get a good feeling about the situation, go ahead and invite him or her out for lunch. If the person you're interested in flirts with you or seems open to such advancements, it's acceptable to flirt. Just make sure it's done discreetly. But if your attempt is met with a cold shoulder, get the clue and drop the matter altogether. One key word to respect after you've asked a co-worker for a date is "No." This means no more asking, no more hanging around the other person's cubicle, no more prolonged eye contact.
  22. 22. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 22 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e On the other hand, if you're asked out by a co-worker who you have no interest in dating, be honest in telling that person how you feel without being offensive. That is the best way to put an end to the situation quickly and avoid repeated requests. Dating someone from the office So you finally got up the nerve to ask your co-worker out for dinner, and he or she said "Yes!" And then you went out again and then another time. Now it's been several weeks or months. Work is so much more enjoyable than it used to be. You feel energized and everything seems right with the world. However, during this period of time, you need to exercise caution and restraint. Be especially aware of how you and your partner are behaving in the office. Don't flaunt the relationship, be discreet, and behave professionally and respectfully in all office situations. Just as important, both you and your partner should ensure that your romance does not affect your ability to get your jobs done. Make an extra effort to apply yourselves to your work and to conduct yourselves in a way that demonstrates this.
  23. 23. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 23 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e When the relationship dissolves Sadly, not all relationships work, and that includes the office romance. Now what do you do? It hurts, especially so because you must still see your former partner every day. On top of that, you might be a little angry, but don't let this affect the way you do your job. Remember that open hostilities can damage the department's atmosphere – and possibly your careers. The best way to handle a dissolving relationship is to keep it to yourself. No doubt the thing you may want to do the most is talk about your troubles. Unfortunately, that's the last thing you should do in the office. Spare your peers the grisly details and your darker moods. Your co-workers will appreciate it and admire your forbearance. You might want to consider taking a few days off to collect yourself, especially if you're truly devastated by the situation and feel your office behavior just won't be up to par. Most of all, be civil, try to keep your relationship with your ex-partner on an even keel, and ignore discourtesies. Despite the relaxed attitude toward office romances compared to eras past, romance in the workplace still requires a keen understanding of the proper etiquette. The last thing you want to do is alienate the people you work with. Should you find yourself in an office romance, be sure to exercise common sense and follow the rules of etiquette.
  24. 24. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 24 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e H. The New Rules for Business Chivalry Chivalry in the business world isn't dead; it's just changing. Within a generation, the rules of etiquette that once urged men to pamper women have been turned upside down. It's now a level playing field, with women rightfully asserting their power and independence alongside men. Now women are extending some of those age-old courtesies to their male counterparts. Yet members of both genders are sometimes offended by such behavior. How do you know which civilities are off the map? And how should you respond to chivalry in any case? Welcome to the "new etiquette." Chivalry for the 21st century Twenty-first-century business etiquette no longer makes a distinction between which gender should do what for whom and in which situations. Instead, the etiquette of chivalry has become gender-free. It's now a simple matter of courtesy. Whether a man helps a woman, or vice versa, depends on the situation and who's in need. For example  The person who arrives at the door first holds it for everyone else.  The host, or whoever asked the others out for the business lunch, pays the tab.  If someone's struggling with his coat, give him a hand. Otherwise, allow people to put their coats on themselves.  A person of either gender typically appreciates an offer to help carry a heavy or awkward load.  It's still considered polite to rise to greet someone, especially in business situations in which you're greeting a client or superior. However, it's not necessary to stand each time a woman returns from making a call or visiting the restroom.  It's no longer necessary, or even acceptable, to presume that a female business contact needs help with her chair. People of either gender who truly need help will usually ask. Chivalry you'd best forget Obviously, things have changed, and for the better. It's much more practical to help someone based on that person's real need, rather than to offer assistance as a form of flattery or superiority. Nevertheless, there are forms of chivalry that should be avoided. For example, some people may skew what they consider to be chivalrous behavior, or they may take it to an extreme. Some types of "chivalry" to avoid include
  25. 25. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 25 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e  consistently offering basic courtesies to one gender but not the other  always having to be the one to offer the civility in the first place, which says to others, "Hey, look at how proper and caring I am!"  forcing your chivalry on people when they don't want it How to respond to chivalry Maybe you don't need or want someone else to be chivalrous. What's the appropriate way to respond to chivalry in this case? It helps to be understanding. Recognize the kindness when you see it, and thank the person for the gesture. Some people are compulsive do-gooders, and you just may have to accept that in some circumstances. Chivalry is alive and well in the 21st century – and it's now easier to practice than ever before. Be courteous to others, but don't go overboard. Remember, chivalry is now gender-free. Keep the points listed above in mind when determining whether to act in a chivalrous manner – and accept chivalrous behavior in the manner in which it's intended. And get used to the age of new etiquette, because it has arrived in the workplace.
  26. 26. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 26 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e I. Two Company Decision-making Processes The work at most companies can be divided into two activities: making decisions and carrying them out. Clearly, some companies do a better job performing these activities than others. The culture of a company determines who makes decisions and how those decisions are passed on to the rest of the organization. Individual supervisors use different supervisory styles to convert those decisions into actions. If you understand how these two processes work at your company, you'll know when to act and when to defer to your supervisor. All companies have unique cultures, but most of them will fit into one of three types when it comes to the way decisions are made: 1. In a company with a hierarchical culture, decisions are made at the top and communicated down through a strong chain of command. Hierarchical cultures are most common in long- established, conservative organizations. 2. Participatory cultures allow input from different levels within the company. Final decisions may be made by top management or delegated elsewhere. Participatory cultures are most common in small to mid-size companies. 3. Distributed cultures spread the ability to make decisions widely to all levels of the organization. Decisions tend to be made by the same people who carry them out. This kind of culture is most common in small companies with highly skilled workers. Companies with hierarchical cultures place a great emphasis on following orders, while participatory and distributed decision-making cultures allow – or expect – employees to contribute to the decision- making process. After the decisions have been made, someone has to carry them out. A manager's supervisory style determines how the work will be assigned and how the job will be completed. Most supervisors can be described as Quarterbacks, Coaches, or Cheerleaders.  In a football game, the quarterback doesn't just direct the action; he's the player who most often has his hands on the ball. That's how quarterback-type supervisors like to do their jobs. Quarterbacks prefer to do things themselves rather than delegate to others.  A football coach doesn't run, throw the ball, or tackle the opposing players. A coach decides on a game plan that others carry out. Supervisors who work like coaches tend to delegate
  27. 27. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 27 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e tasks to subordinates frequently, provide guidelines for action instead of detailed instructions, and ask for opinions, but they make final decisions themselves.  Cheerleaders are more interested in raising enthusiasm and reaching goals than getting involved in the action, directly or indirectly. Cheerleader-style supervisors let their subordinates make plans and take action without interference, as long as they get results. These three styles may not accurately describe all supervisors, but they should point out the differences in the way supervisors delegate the authority to make decisions and take action. By understanding the basic ways company cultures distribute the responsibility for decision-making, and how supervisors delegate responsibility to their subordinates, you will know how to deal with your supervisor and how to better make decisions at your job.
  28. 28. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 28 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e J. Etiquette and the Authority to Lead When it's time to take action, you have only three choices: Lead, follow, or get out of the way. Of course, "getting out of the way" is rarely an acceptable choice when there's work to be done. So the proper course of action is to either lead or follow. If you know the right way to go about it, the choice is yours. Your goal, however, should be to tailor your decisions to the company culture and supervisory style in which you work. A company's culture determines who holds the authority to make decisions. If you decide to take the lead in taking action, you have to be sure the organization gives you the authority to act. Good etiquette requires you to observe your company's culture before you assume you have the authority to lead. You need to consider several points:  One company culture is a strict hierarchy. If workers want to take initiative, they need to work through the chain of command. The first step is to document the actions they want to take. Then they wait until they receive approval to proceed.  A participatory culture seeks input from many levels in the organization before managers make the final call. Workers who want to take the lead can gather information and prepare solutions without seeking approval, but they should report back to their bosses.  A company using distributed decision-making expects people to take initiative, so assertive action is welcome. People should start by talking to other workers who may be affected by their actions. They need to build consensus, then implement their decisions. There may be times when you'd rather let others lead. Perhaps you're still learning a new job responsibility or just don't want to take on a new task. The solution is to provide information so others can lead. When you make the decision to lead, you first must think about your boss' supervisory style. Some supervisors may be offended by subordinates who are too assertive. However, in most situations, supervisors appreciate workers who show initiative. If you take actions compatible with your boss' supervisory style, you'll avoid giving the impression you're trying to do your boss's job. Keep the
  29. 29. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 29 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e following points in mind when dealing with the three types of supervisors: quarterbacks, coaches, or cheerleaders.  Bosses who are quarterbacks want to be involved in everything. If you want this type of boss to take charge, just ask his advice. Before you know it, he'll make the plan, assign the tasks, and do a big chunk of the work himself.  Bosses who are coaches like to talk strategy, but then they'll expect you to take over from there. If you want to be a follower, you'll sometimes have to ask the coach to lead. Coaches will lead as a way to help you learn, but don't expect them to change roles frequently.  If your supervisor is a cheerleader and you want to be a follower, you have a problem. Cheerleaders stay on the sidelines while you do the work. You'll have to convince a cheerleader that you can't handle the task before he'll take charge. As you can see, there are no simple rules of etiquette to follow when you're deciding whether to be a leader or a follower. But by tailoring your decisions to the company culture and supervisory style in which you work, you can ensure you're successful when you decide it's time for you to take the lead. What's more, you'll be able to choose the right course of action in everyday business situations. Company Cultures/Recommended Strategies Leader Follower Hierarchy Ask for the task to be delegated through the chain of command. Prepare detailed information to answer the supervisor's questions. Participatory Prepare proposals for the supervisor to approve and distribute. Present your point of view without plans for action. Distributed Build consensus with others affected by the decision. Ask questions to identify potential leaders. Supervisory Styles/Recommended Strategies Leader Follower Quarterback Present several proposals simultaneously; describe proposed course of action. Ask for advice. Coach Present two to three alternative proposals for analysis and planning. Ask your supervisor to take leadership action. Cheerleader Present a single proposal, including goals. Keep a low profile. Don't volunteer information or ask questions.
  30. 30. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 30 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e K. Annexes: Glossary
  31. 31. Study Notes http://SlideShare.net/OxfordCambridge 31 | P a g e S t a n d a r d B u s i n e s s E t i q u e t t e L. Glossary audience The co-workers, customers, and managers an employee interacts with to perform a job. The people who will observe and respond to the employee's behavior. cheerleader A supervisor who prefers not to become directly involved in a subordinate's work but to guide the employee through encouragement, motivation, and setting goals. coach A supervisor who prefers to analyze tasks with his subordinates and discuss strategies but who rarely participates in the assigned tasks. company culture The norms and expected behaviors within a company, including deference to authority, expectations regarding overtime, urgency in completing tasks, and even dress codes. decision-making culture The methods a company uses to gain or limit participation in the decision-making process within the company. distributed culture A decision-making culture that encourages employees at all levels to make independent decisions and act on them. etiquette Not a set of formal rules, but a process of choosing courses of action that respect the needs of co-workers and facilitate interactions. hierarchy culture A corporate culture that limits the participation of all but senior managers in the decision-making process; such a culture relies on a rigid chain-of-command. participatory culture A decision-making culture that invites participation from many levels of employees but reserves final approval for middle and upper managers. quarterback A supervisor who prefers to become directly involved in the work performed by subordinates. supervisory style The method a manager uses to delegate tasks to subordinates.

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