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Research Data Management for Librarians at Oxford Brookes

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Research Data Management for Librarians at Oxford Brookes

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Workshop given at Oxford Brookes University on Tuesday 21st May 2013. Includes Research Data Management at Oxford Brookes

Workshop given at Oxford Brookes University on Tuesday 21st May 2013. Includes Research Data Management at Oxford Brookes

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Research Data Management for Librarians at Oxford Brookes

  1. 1. Research Data Management for librarians
  2. 2. Introductions Introduce yourself and your involvement with research data management at Oxford Brookes so far
  3. 3. Research Data Demystified
  4. 4. What are research data?  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JBQS0qKOBU  Video from DCC – first 3.10 minutes
  5. 5. Research lifecycle Create Document Use Store Share Preserve
  6. 6. Creating data: questions What formats will you use? - determined by the instruments / software you have to use - common, widespread formats to enable reuse How will you create your data? - What methodologies and standards will you use? - How will you address ethical concerns and protect participants? - Will you control variations to provide quality assurance? - What external data sets will you use? (See the BL Social Science Collection guide to Management and Business studies datasets) Create
  7. 7. Different formats are good for different things - open, lossless formats are more sustainable e.g. rtf, xml, tif, wav - proprietary and/or compressed formats are less preservable but are often in widespread use e.g. doc, jpg, mp3 May choose one format for analysis then convert to a standard format for preservation / sharing Excellent guidance on creating data & managing ethics in: www.data-archive.ac.uk/media/2894/managingsharing.pdf Creating data: advice Create
  8. 8. Documenting data: questions What information do users need to understand the data? - descriptions of all variables / fields and their values - code labels, classification schema, abbreviations list - information about the project and data creators - tips on usage e.g. exceptions, quirks, questionable results How will you capture this? Are there standards you can use? DocumentCreate
  9. 9. • How will you move data around? • What about the security of data? • Is there an appropriate RDM system in place Using data: questions UseDocumentCreate
  10. 10. • Restrict access to those who need to read/edit data • Consider the data security implications or where you store data and from which devices you access files • Choose appropriate methods to transfer / share data • filestores & encrypted media rather than email & Dropbox Using data: advice UseDocumentCreate
  11. 11. Storing data: questions What is available to you? What facilities do you need? - remote access - file sharing with colleagues - high-levels of security How will the data be backed up? StoreUseDocumentCreate
  12. 12. Storing data: advice Remember that all storage is fallible – need to back-up - keep 2+ copies on different types of media in different locations - manage back-ups (migrate media, test integrity) Choose appropriate methods to transfer / share data - email, dropbox, ftp, encrypted media, filestore, VREs... StoreUseDocumentCreate
  13. 13. Sharing data: questions A Panda and Bear story about datasharing – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVZbk3GEVSw Does your funder expect you to share data? Which data can be shared? How will you share your data? What do you get from sharing? - citations, recognition... StoreUseDocumentCreate Share
  14. 14. Reasons to share data BENEFITS  Avoid duplication  Scientific integrity  More collaboration  Better research  More reuse & value  Increased citation 9-30% increase depending on e.g. discipline (Piwowar et al, 2007, 2013) DRIVERS  Public expectations  Government agenda  Content mining ― http://www.jisc.ac.uk/news/stories/2 012/03/textmining.aspx  RCUK Data Policy ― www.rcuk.ac.uk/research/Pages/Data Policy.aspx  Oxford Brookes Policy
  15. 15. Sharing data: advice Where possible, make your data available via repositories, data centres and structured databases http://datacite.org/repolist http://databib.org/ RADAR: https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/ StoreUseDocumentCreate Share
  16. 16. Preserving data: questions Are you required to preserve (or destroy) your data? How will you select what to keep? Is there somewhere you can archive your data? How can you support the reuse of your data? StoreUseDocumentCreate Share Preserve
  17. 17. Preserving data: advice How to select and appraise research data: www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/appraise-select-research-data How to licence research data www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/license-research-data How to cite datasets and link to publications www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/cite-datasets StoreUseDocumentCreate Share Preserve
  18. 18. Research Data Management at Oxford Brookes Sarah Taylor, Research Support Manager, RBDO
  19. 19. Where did we start?  Traditionally have had a very devolved set-up  Schools (as was) largely responsible for own data storage – some central provision but no consistency  Some subjects more experience in this area than others  Issues around hardcopy data and digital data – and the move from one to the other  Have a wide range of data – samples, artefacts, datasets, models, questionnaires, artworks etc etc
  20. 20. Why did we start?  (failed) JISC bid  Support from DCC  Centralisation of IT provision – establishment of OBIS  New Faculty structure with focus moved to subject disciplines (lots of Departments)  Central support functions all in Directorates  Acknowledgement of weakness in support in this area
  21. 21. What did we do?  Set up Steering Group (chaired by Pro VC, Research and Knowledge Exchange).  Agreed Research Data Management Policy in February 2013  Set up audit process – 2 Faculties already audited, remaining 2 being completed by May 2013 – which Rowena is going to talk about  Trying to work across support areas: RBDO, Learning Resources, OBIS  Set up webpages with ‘stuff’ – revising over summer 2013  Trying to use existing solutions – linking with Oxford JISC projects (DataStage, DataFlow etc; Neurohub)  Working with DCC on how to develop, pitfalls to avoid, kick- off meetings for each of the audit processes
  22. 22. The business end.… What now?  Steering Group still meeting  Research Data Management Policy supported by an operational document  Academic staff taking up instances of Neurohub at Oxford Brookes  Working with DCC on DMP Online for Oxford Brookes – just about to test this with two researchers at Brookes who have received RCUK funding  Significant impact in terms of awareness-raising (not so sure on practice changing – but noises being made)
  23. 23. What about resources?  So far, no additional resource  Audits done within existing workloads  Policy developments, meetings with other stakeholders done within existing workload  Real willingness to see how what we already have can be developed to provide better support  Bought Converis – our CRIS system. Will use this or our Repository to flag where completed research data sits  Will use our Repository to hold completed data if not held in national/international repository
  24. 24. Future scenario  Until December 2014, or later, no idea on money available for central support ie QR  Need Faculties to flag up needs in Strategic Planning round, to influence if money can be allocated for support in Directorates  Using and developing existing expertise (IT Business Partners; Subject Librarians; Research Managers; RBDO)  Will the technology save us?
  25. 25. Data Audit Framework – the story so far October 2011 DCC consultancy starts Faculty of Health and Life Sciences - ran a pilot for Digital Audit Framework (DAF) January 2012 - DCC conducted introductory workshop – research staff, research support staff , librarians, OBIS business partners March– June 2012 - 30 research active staff interviewed – different roles, different departments
  26. 26. The PILOT Audit - How did we do it? Team of interviewers – research support staff in faculty, Sarah Taylor from RBDO, RR, and 1 other. • Associate Dean RKT gave us names of staff to be interviewed which were distributed amongst interviewers. • Pre meeting with interviewers then left to setup meeting with researcher • Once fixed a date – send out pre-interview information just to prepare them for the sort of questions we were going to ask
  27. 27. Preparation
  28. 28. The Results • Structured interview – recorded within Google form, Usually conducted in researcher’s office The Interview • Google can be exported to excel • Aim to genuinely help researchers What do you see as the top 3 priorities for services that could help you benefit from more effective data management? Policy / Guidelines on research data management? 38% Training? 38% Storage, backup and access services? 85% Preservation, archiving and sharing 69% Other 4% Note: People may select more than one checkbox, so percentages may add up to more than 100%.
  29. 29. Where are we now? September – December 2012 – Faculty of Technology, Design and the Environment Introductory meeting facilitated by DCC for research staff and support staff. Invited subject librarians to come along and get involved in interviewing 4 subject librarians became interviewers, 2 OBIS, 2 from Faculty Research Support, Sarah and myself 28 interviews conducted January- June 2013 Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Business Introductory meeting facilitated by DCC 7 subject librarians Thanks to all who have helped with interviews
  30. 30. What Next? Data Audit Framework Consider output from interviews – July – Help needed Ongoing involvement Research Data Management Policy – what does it say? RADAR – a place to signpost and store and make openly available research data Communication – web pages – work with RBDO, DMP online http://www.brookes.ac.uk/res/support/staff/managing_data/index_html Collaborating with OBIS – data storage and backup , Oxford University, DCC, - DMP online Subject Librarians – a role for you?
  31. 31. Data Management Planning
  32. 32. Data Management Planning DMPs are written at the start of a project to define:  What data will be collected or created?  How the data will be documented and described?  Where the data will be stored?  Who will be responsible for data security and backup?  Which data will be shared and/or preserved?  How the data will be shared and with whom?
  33. 33. Why develop a DMP? DMPs are often submitted with grant applications, but are useful whenever researchers are creating data. They can help researchers to:  Make informed decisions to anticipate & avoid problems  Avoid duplication, data loss and security breaches  Develop procedures early on for consistency  Ensure data are accurate, complete, reliable and secure
  34. 34. Which funders require a DMP? www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/policy-and-legal/ overview-funders-data-policies
  35. 35. What do research funders want?  A brief plan submitted in grant applications, and in the case of NERC, a more detailed plan once funded  1-3 sides of A4 as attachment or a section in Je-S form  Typically a prose statement covering suggested themes  Outline data management and sharing plans, justifying decisions and any limitations
  36. 36. Five common themes / questions  Description of data to be collected / created (i.e. content, type, format, volume...)  Standards / methodologies for data collection & management  Ethics and Intellectual Property (highlight any restrictions on data sharing e.g. embargoes, confidentiality)  Plans for data sharing and access (i.e. how, when, to whom)  Strategy for long-term preservation
  37. 37. A useful framework to get started Think about why the questions are being asked Look at examples to get an idea of what to include www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/content/datamanagement/dmp/framework.html
  38. 38. Help from the DCC https://dmponline.dcc.ac.uk www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/develop-data-plan
  39. 39. How DMPonline works Create a plan based on relevant funder / institutional templates... ...and then answer the questions using the guidance provided
  40. 40. Demo of DMPonline at OB
  41. 41. Exercise: DMP checklist Imagine that you have been called in by a researcher for a meeting about writing a DMP.  Go through DCC’s Data Management Plan checklist  What are the five things your researcher is going to have most difficulty with? Explain why you choose each item.
  42. 42. Tips to share: writing DMPs  Keep it simple, short and specific  Seek advice - consult and collaborate  Base plans on available skills and support  Make sure implementation is feasible  Justify any resources or restrictions needed Also see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7OJtiA53-Fk
  43. 43. Supporting researchers with DMPs Various types of support could be provided by libraries:  Guidelines and templates on what to include in plans  Example answers, guidance and links to local support  A library of successful DMPs to reuse  Training courses and guidance websites  Tailored consultancy services  Online tools (e.g. customised DMPonline)
  44. 44. Roles and Activities
  45. 45. Possible Library RDM roles  Leading on local (institutional) data policy  Bringing data into undergraduate research-based learning  Teaching data literacy to postgraduate students  Developing researcher data awareness  Providing advice, e.g. on writing DMPs or advice on RDM within a project  Explaining the impact of sharing data, and how to cite data  Signposting who in the University to consult in relation to a particular question  Auditing to identify data sets for archiving or RDM needs  Developing and managing access to data collections  Documenting what datasets an institution has  Developing local data curation capacity  Promoting data reuse by making known what is available RDMRose Lite
  46. 46. Activity 1.3.1 Potential RDM roles for LIS professionals  What could you do tomorrow?  Which roles fit best with how you work now / existing professional practices?  Which roles might the library wish to avoid taking on? Sep-2012 Learning material produced by RDMRose http://www.sheffield.ac .uk/is/research/project s/rdmrose
  47. 47. Why should libraries support RDM? RDM requires the input of all support services, but libraries are taking the lead in the UK – why? ― existing data and open access leadership roles ― often run publication repositories ― have good relationships with researchers ― proven liaison and negotiation skills ― knowledge of information management, metadata etc ― highly relevant skill set
  48. 48. How are libraries engaging in RDM? Library IT Research Office The library is leading on most DCC institutional engagements. They are involved in:  defining the institutional strategy  developing RDM policy  delivering training courses  helping researchers to write DMPs  advising on data sharing and citation  setting up data repositories  ... www.dcc.ac.uk/community/institutional-engagements
  49. 49. An exciting opportunity  Leadership  Providing tools and support  Advocacy and training  Developing data informatics capacity & capability “Researchers need help to manage their data. This is a really exciting opportunity for libraries….” Liz Lyon, VALA 2012
  50. 50. Exercise: skills to support RDM  Based on the activities we discussed earlier, consider who may have relevant skills or expertise to share.  You have 15 minutes Activity Library IT Services (OBIS) Research Support Other Copyright Data citation Information literacy Data storage Digital preservation Metadata
  51. 51. Summary
  52. 52. Feedback  Has the event met your expectations? ― If not, what would you have liked to see more / less of?  Was the content useful?  Did you like the mix of exercises?
  53. 53. Acknowledgement Ideas and content have been taken from various courses: ― Skills matrix, ADMIRe project, University of Nottingham http://admire.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2012/09/18/rdmnottingham-training-event ― DIY Training Kit for Librarians, University of Edinburgh http://datalib.edina.ac.uk/mantra/libtraining.html ― Managing your research data, Research360, University of Bath http://opus.bath.ac.uk/32296 ― RDMRose Lite, University of Sheffield http://rdmrose.group.shef.ac.uk/?page_id=364 ― RoaDMaP training materials, University of Leeds http://library.leeds.ac.uk/roadmap-project-outputs ― SupportDM modules, University of East London http://www.uel.ac.uk/trad/outputs/resources

Editor's Notes

  • For this we are just going to show the first 3 minutes of this video as we think most of you already know this and there is more information in the handbook
  • Angus going to talk about Data Management Planning
  • Just stick to showing this slide
  • Split into 3 groups to discuss this. Report back hopefully get a feel for different problems in different subject disciplines (5 mins then coffee)If coffee has arrived, grab a cup, report back in 10 mins. Bit of flexibility.Marieke and Angus to manage reporting back
  • Helen and Rowena to manage reporting after exercise
  • Marieke to present from here
  • Use more detailed matrix from handbook or Oxford Brookes matrixReporting back – Helen/Rowena to manageComplete Oxford Brookes Matrix
  • Jan to wrap up with conclusions
  • ×