Successfully reported this slideshow.

Bridging the gap between researchers and research data management

2

Share

1 of 21
1 of 21

More Related Content

Related Books

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

Bridging the gap between researchers and research data management

  1. 1. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Marieke Guy Digital Curation Centre m.guy@ukoln.ac.uk Funded by: This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 UK: Scotland License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/scotland/ ; or, (b) send a letter to Creative Commons, 543 Howard Street, 5th Floor, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. Bridging the gap between researchers and research data management
  2. 2. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Research data • Data, or units of information which are created in the course of funded or unfunded research • The highest priority research data is that which underpins a research output • Facts, statistics, qualitative, quantitative, not published research output, discipline specific http://www.flickr.com/photos/charl eswelch/3597432481//
  3. 3. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Partitioning research data • Research lifecycle • Research process • Research domain • Other factors e.g. scale
  4. 4. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London
  5. 5. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London •Government Open Agenda •Public pressure – data as a public good •Changes in funders’ data policies •Research now becoming more global and more ‘data Intensive’ – Riding the Wave report •Institutional need for better research integrity - REF •Best practice •Desire to be ‘good researcher’ and a well-cited researcher External Internal RDM drivers
  6. 6. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Key questions to consider when: - Creating data - Documenting data - Storing data - Sharing data - Preserving data - Planning data management How do you manage data?
  7. 7. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Digital Curation Centre (DCC) • Consortium comprising units from the Universities of Bath (UKOLN), Edinburgh (DCC Centre) and Glasgow (HATII) • launched 1st March 2004 as a national centre for solving challenges in digital curation that could not be tackled by any single institution or discipline • funded by JISC with additional HEFCE funding from 2011 for the • provision of support to national cloud services • targeted institutional development
  8. 8. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Screen Shot 2012-05-03 at 11.14.00.png http://www.dcc.ac.uk/
  9. 9. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, LondonHow to cite data • How to: appraise and select, cite data sets, develop a data management plan, licence research data • Access: embargoes, FOI • Storage: file-store, cloud, data centres, funder policy • Worked intensively Informatics: disciplinary metadata schema, standards, formats, identifiers, ontologies • New: How to set a RDM service – coming soon!
  10. 10. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Institutional Engagements • Worked intensively with 20+ HEIs to increase RDM capability • 60 days of free effort per HEI drawn from a mix of DCC staff • Single point of contact - Senior Institutional Support Officer • Deploy DCC & external tools, approaches & best practice • Support varied based on what each institution wanted/needs • Lessons & examples to be shared with the community www.dcc.ac.uk/community/institutional
  11. 11. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Who are we working with?
  12. 12. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Support from the DCC Assess Needs Make the case Develop support and services RDM policy development DAF & CARDIO assessments Guidance and training Workflow assessment DCC support team Advocacy with senior management Institutional data catalogues Pilot RDM tools Customised Data Management Plans …and support policy implementation
  13. 13. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London DCC Tools • CARDIO (http://cardio.dcc.ac.uk) – Used at research group or department level to assess activity and data management infrastructure and contribute to an institution-wide view. • DAF (http://www.data-audit.eu) – Structured mechanism to identify what data exists, who claims responsibility for it and what long-term custody issues it presents. • DMPOnline tool (http://dmponline.dcc.ac.uk) – Creation of a customised DMPOnline, which develops data management plans that fit funder requirements before and after an award of grant. • Risk management (http://bit.ly/drambora)
  14. 14. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Knowledge organising systems • Institutional data registries and Current Research Information Systems (CRIS) • Retrieval systems: – Identifiers, e.g. for data, people & organisations (e.g. DOI, ORCID) – Citation frameworks, attribution, provenance (e.g. DataCite) – National / discipline-based data registries – Metadata standards (e.g. RIF-CF, CERIF, DCMI) – DCC catalog – Open data approaches and the use of semantic technologies (e.g. Linked Data)
  15. 15. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Case Study: Oxford Brookes • Steering group meeting attendance • Policy and EPSRC roadmap development • Conducted a DAF in 4 different faculties (Business, Health & Life Sciences, Humanities & Social Sciences, Technology, Design & Environment)- investigated data holdings, capacity growth, current practice etc. • DMP Online template • CARDIO lite exercise • Training sessions for researchers and librarians
  16. 16. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London immersiveInformatics • Pilot training programme • Research data management training for HE support services • Run in parallel at Uni of Bath and Uni of Melbourne • Modular training - 10 modules delivered at approximately one module per week, delivered in one-day F2F workshops • Supported with a suite of resources • Two modules will feature Immersive Research Department Days (IRDDs) and will involve shadowing practising researchers • Participants will work on a real dataset and create a data diary
  17. 17. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London • Less hierarchy  quicker approval • Smaller scale  easier to engage research community • Researchers more willing to work with the centre • Senior management more hands-on Existing tools & resources + quicker process of change = opportunity for smaller, modern institutions to storm ahead Reflections: small is beautiful
  18. 18. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Socio-organisational factors • Awareness by HEIs of the value of research data as a component of their knowledge store • High-level management commitment – pilot services • Fostering of relationships across departments, disciplines and support groups • Engagement with external stakeholders e.g. commercial partners and funders • Training for researchers, librarians, support staff
  19. 19. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Components of RDM support service From ‘How to develop RDM services’
  20. 20. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Final thoughts.. • DCC has published reports, case studies, blog posts and best practice guides • Process has vehicle for embedding good practice within small group - broader impact on the HE community • Possible to identify changes in research data management practice as a result of institutional engagements • External interest in programme • New tranche of engagements planned – with changes – DCC 121 • Much overlap with knowledge organisation field of study
  21. 21. ISKO UK Biennial Conference, 9th July 2013, London Any questions? • Thanks to my DCC colleagues for help with my paper and slides

Editor's Notes

  • We ’ve tried to get a balanced mix of institutions, from ancient unis such as Edinburgh and Glasgow to more modern post 1992 institutions. There ’s a geographic spread and a mixture of research strengths.
  • To close I want to pick up on some trends that differentiate smaller, more modern institutions in terms of progressing RDM - In places such as Northampton and UEL there ’s less hierarchy so it’s been quicker to get policies and roadmaps approved. - Less research-intensive unis also have a smaller cohort of researchers to engage with – it ’s easier to disseminate news and get them involved - Researchers seem to be more willing to use central services – there ’s not the same degree of autonomy and resistance as in large, ancient unis - Senior management may commit more time to getting involved in RDM work – anecdote that PVC-R at OB stayed throughout DC101 workshop and joined in the breakout discussion with researchers to identify what they needed This flexibility and speed of change presents a real opportunity for smaller unis to storm ahead
  • ×