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Political Communication: Old and new media relationships

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POLITICAL COMMUNICATION:
OLD AND NEW MEDIA
RELATIONSHIPS
Michael Gurevitch, Stephen Coleman and Jay G. Blumler
Mariana Pon...

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OLD AND NEW MEDIA
RELATIONSHIPS
We have always to keep in mind that every new technology
brings huge transformations in th...

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1.
QUIZ: TV X INTERNET
Be kind, engage with this game! :)

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Political Communication: Old and new media relationships

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Presentation about the article "Political Communication: old and new media relationships", by Michael Gurevitch, Stephen Coleman and Jay G. Blumler, presented during the Political Communication course, in my World Internet Studies Masters in ISCTE-IUL.

Presentation about the article "Political Communication: old and new media relationships", by Michael Gurevitch, Stephen Coleman and Jay G. Blumler, presented during the Political Communication course, in my World Internet Studies Masters in ISCTE-IUL.

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Political Communication: Old and new media relationships

  1. 1. POLITICAL COMMUNICATION: OLD AND NEW MEDIA RELATIONSHIPS Michael Gurevitch, Stephen Coleman and Jay G. Blumler Mariana Pontual Braga e Álvares October 2019
  2. 2. OLD AND NEW MEDIA RELATIONSHIPS We have always to keep in mind that every new technology brings huge transformations in the society. Technology is not "good" or "bad" for democracy. There is no space for this kind of determinism. There are more things in common between TV and the Internet in the political communication field that we can imagine. 2
  3. 3. 1. QUIZ: TV X INTERNET Be kind, engage with this game! :)
  4. 4. 1. Depoliticization 4 _____ shifted the focus of political discourse from issues to personalities.
  5. 5. 1. Depoliticization 5 _____ shifted the focus of political discourse from issues to personalities. Answer: TV. The educational value of election campaigns, which was once regarded as a key benefit of televised politics, was allegedly diminished by this focus on spectacle rather than ideas (p. 166).
  6. 6. 2. Public X private 6 _____ transferred politics from the public arena to the living room.
  7. 7. 2. Public x private 7 _____ transferred politics from the public arena to the living room. Answer: TV. By bringing politics into the home, television undoubtedly contributed to the expansion of the audience for politics. (...)At the same time, the multiplication of television and other media outlets offering diverse contents has allowed viewers to escape from political content into a vast range of diversionary offerings (p. 166).
  8. 8. 3. Polarization 8 _____ creates more scope for selectivity and more opportunities for group herding and opinion polarization.
  9. 9. 3. Polarization 9 _____ creates more scope for selectivity and more opportunities for group herding and opinion polarization. Answer: Internet. Whereas televised coverage diminished partisanship by reducing possibilities for selective exposure, the new media makes it easier to establish partisan patterns of media access by creating more scope for selectivity (p. 175)
  10. 10. 4. Protagonism 10 _____ moved from the role of "observer" of events and emerged as definer and constructor of political reality.
  11. 11. 4. Protagonism 11 _____ moved from the role of "observer" of events and emerged as definer and constructor of political reality. Answer: TV. Television moved into the center of the political stage, assuming a “coproducer” role of political messages instead of the earlier journalistically sanctioned “reporter” role (p. 166).
  12. 12. 5. Inequality 12 Reflect patterns of social inequality, with poorer, less educated people least likely to have access to or skills in _____.
  13. 13. 5. Inequality 13 Reflect patterns of social inequality, with poorer, less educated people least likely to have access to or skills in _____. Answer: Using the internet. The growing importance of the online environment could serve to strengthen the voices of the privileged, leaving citizens with limited resources reliant upon a narrowing range of mass-media sources providing shallow political information (p.174)
  14. 14. 6. Power 14 _____ and politics became indeed complementary institutions, existing in a state of mutual dependence.
  15. 15. 6. Power 15 _____ and politics became indeed complementary institutions, existing in a state of mutual dependence. Answer: TV. As the medium became settled and ubiquitous, it came to seem as if politics in electoral democracies could not take place without or beyond the mediating gaze of television (p. 165).
  16. 16. 2. INTERNET > TV So as we can see the TV and the Internet have similarities, but the media ecosystem is changing with the growing presence of the Internet in our lives.
  17. 17. PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN NEWS IN 2008 17
  18. 18. ALL KINDS OF NEWS IN 2017 Source: Reuters Institute Digital Report News 2017 - 75,000 online news consumers in 38 countries
  19. 19. TV remains a significant medium for political communication and news in general. But we can see an ecological reconfiguration, with recasting roles and relationships within an evolving media landscape. 19
  20. 20. 3. CONSEQUENCES It is to the new pressures facing each of the key players in political communication that we now turn.
  21. 21. 1. CONSEQUENCES FOR CITIZENS ❑ Have to deal with information overload, uncertainty about what to trust and the fact that communication resources are not distributed equally (the online environment serve to strengthen the voices of the privileged); ❑ A disorientating sense of being technologically connected, but politically disconnected fuels civic disengagement. 21
  22. 22. 2. CONSEQUENCES FOR THE MASS MEDIA ❑ Need to redefine the nature of their contribution to the political public sphere beyond "simply telling the story" and according to their public service function; ❑ Journalists have a unique opportunity to provide authoritative interpretation and filter the vast amount of data, news, rumor, and conversation that is accessible, with a view to presenting a broad and balanced account of political events and ideas. 22
  23. 23. 3. CONSEQUENCES FOR GOVERNMENTS/POLITICIANS ❑ Adopt an increasingly responsive mode rather than the proactive, agenda-setting role they would prefer; ❑ Need to construct sincere, authentic personas capable of inspiring trust and generating conversational interaction places, since political discourse is taking a more vernacular, quotidian form. 23
  24. 24. 4. CONCLUSION The new features of political communication present challenges for media policy makers.
  25. 25. CONCLUSION The future of this ambivalent relationship between television and politics, and of political communication more generally, entails normative policy choices. Contrary to the forceful rhetoric of technological determinism, new means of producing, distributing, receiving, and acting upon information do not in themselves shape or reshape the media ecology. Unanticipated and misunderstood, technological innovations not only disrupt settled cultural arrangements but also appear to possess teleological propensities of their own. In the early days of television—and before it, radio and the printing press—many commentators assumed that culture could not withstand their inherent effects. But this is a mistake: technologies are culturally shaped as well as shaping. In these first years of the twenty-first century, policies to shape the new media ecology in a democratic direction are still in their infancy. It is high time for such a policy to be devised, debated, and implemented (p. 176). 25
  26. 26. 26 THANKS! Any questions?

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