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M|18 Migrating from Oracle and Handling PL/SQL Stored Procedures

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M|18 Migrating from Oracle and Handling PL/SQL Stored Procedures

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M|18 Migrating from Oracle and Handling PL/SQL Stored Procedures

  1. 1. Migrations from PL/SQL and Transact-SQL Easier, faster, more efficient than ever with MariaDB 10.3 Wagner Bianchi RDBA Team Lead @ MariaDB RDBA Team Alexander Bienemann Migration Practice Manager @ MariaDB Professional Services
  2. 2. Agenda ● Why migrate? ● PL/SQL syntax in MariaDB ○ How to enable ORACLE SQL_MODE ○ Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ○ Covering the gap ○ What's coming next ● Transact-SQL migration to MariaDB ○ Toolkit ○ Speeding up migrations ● Live demo
  3. 3. Agenda ● Why migrate? ● PL/SQL syntax in MariaDB ○ How to enable ORACLE SQL_MODE ○ Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ○ Covering the gap ○ What's coming next ● Transact-SQL migration to MariaDB ○ Toolkit ○ Speeding up migrations ● Live demo
  4. 4. Why Migrate? Changes in the IT industry: • Big, mature application systems – Long-term utilization and lifecycle – Long-living data, processes, requirements • Cloud-based systems – Strategies, architectures • Changed perception of Open Source – Evolutionary change instead of net-new – Production-readiness • Cost efficiency – Another round of cost reduction • Perception of core features – Pareto principle, 80/20 – What are core functions of a DBMS? • Re-valuation of the Relational Model – OLTP vs. semi-/non-structured data Changes in Open Source and MariaDB: • Open Source has matured – 24/7 support, SLAs, features, ... • MariaDB has gained features – High Availability – Interoperability – SQL features • Migration-supporting features – SQL_MODE=ORACLE • Migration tools – Automatic schema migration – Semi-automatic procedure migration • Migration Practice within MariaDB – Highly specialized analysis – Best practices – Scaling out migration projects
  5. 5. Features for cost-effective migration: • Common Table Expressions, CTE’s – Convenient aliases for subqueries – Recursive SQL queries – Introduced in MariaDB 10.2 • Window Functions – NTILE, RANK, DENSE_RANK, … – For analytic purposes, convenient handling of query result sets – Introduced in MariaDB 10.2 • Native PL/SQL parsing – Direct execution of native Oracle procedures – Introduced in MariaDB 10.3 Migrations have become easier Target architectures at eye level: • Shared-nothing replication architecture – Synchronous, asynchronous, semi-synchronous – Failovers with no write transaction loss • Replication performance: – In-order parallelized replication on slaves – Reduces asynchronous replication delays • Security and compliance: – Audit Plug-In – Encryption of data, data-at-rest – Certificates, TLS connections – PAM plugin
  6. 6. • MySQL: – all industries covered • Oracle: – Banking – Financials / investment – E-Procurement – Trading, retail – Repair services – Business software – Telecommunications • Sybase / Transact-SQL: – Insurance Example migration projects
  7. 7. Agenda ● Why migrate? ● PL/SQL syntax in MariaDB ○ How to enable ORACLE SQL_MODE ○ Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ○ Covering the gap ○ What's coming next ● Transact-SQL migration to MariaDB ○ Toolkit ○ Speeding up migrations ● Live demo
  8. 8. PL/SQL Syntax in MariaDB SQL_MODE = ORACLE ● From the version 10.3++, MariaDB starts its support to PL/SQL structures; ● For starting using the new features, everything starts with the SQL_MODE; ○ It can be set on the configuration file and then, restarting the MariaDB Server; ○ One can yet set it dynamically, knowing that this way, the configuration won't survive a restart. ● While running the MariaDB Server with the SQL_MODE as ORACLE: ○ The traditional MariaDB syntax for stored routines won't be available at this point on; ● ● ● ● The best option is to run MariaDB Server with the SQL_MODE set on the configuration file to avoid losing the feature in case of a restart. :: wb_on_plsql_mariadb_server :: [(none)]> SELECT @@sql_modeG *************************** 1. row *************************** @@sql_mode: PIPES_AS_CONCAT,ANSI_QUOTES,IGNORE_SPACE,ORACLE,NO_KEY_OPTIONS,NO_TABLE_OPTIONS,NO_FIELD_OPTIONS,NO_AUTO_CREATE_USER 1 row in set (0.000 sec)
  9. 9. Agenda ● Why migrate? ● PL/SQL syntax in MariaDB ○ How to enable ORACLE SQL_MODE ○ Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ○ Covering the gap ○ What's coming next ● Transact-SQL migration to MariaDB ○ Toolkit ○ Speeding up migrations ● Live demo
  10. 10. Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ● The parser is yet evolving and one can keep track of the current development accessing the following JIRA: https://tinyurl.com/yd9otwdv This is not just about PL/SQL, is about: ● Oracle Data Types; ● Oracle Sequences; ● EXECUTE IMMEDIATE; ● Stored Procedures; ● Cursors; ● ...
  11. 11. Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ● The MariaDB support when running with sql_mode=ORACLE: ○ VARCHAR2 - a synonym to VARCHAR; ○ NUMBER - a synonym to DECIMAL; ○ DATE (with time portion) - a synonym to MariaDB DATETIME; ○ RAW - a synonym to VARBINARY; ○ CLOB - a synonym to LONGTEXT; ○ BLOB - a synonym to LONGBLOB.
  12. 12. Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ● Creating tables with Oracle Data Types: #: let's create some tables, using ORACLE DATA TYPES MariaDB [mydb]> CREATE TABLE TBL_CAR_BRAND ( -> CAR_BRAND_NUMBER INTEGER(10) NOT NULL, -> CAR_BRAND_DESC VARCHAR2(4000) NOT NULL, #: mapped out to MariaDB VARCHAR -> CAR_BRAND_LOGO BLOB, #: mapped out to MariaDB LONGBLOB -> PRIMARY KEY(CAR_BRAND_NUMBER) -> ) ENGINE=InnoDB; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.007 sec) MariaDB [mydb]> CREATE TABLE TBL_CAR ( -> CAR_NUMBER INTEGER(10) NOT NULL, -> CAR_BRAND_NUMBER INTEGER(10) NOT NULL, -> CAR_MODEL VARCHAR2(60) NOT NULL, -> CAR_MODEL_PRICE NUMBER(10,2) NOT NULL, #: mapped out to MariaDB DECIMAL -> CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY (CAR_BRAND_NUMBER) REFERENCES TBL_CAR_BRAND(CAR_BRAND_NUMBER), -> PRIMARY KEY(CAR_NUMBER) -> ) ENGINE=InnoDB; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.007 sec)
  13. 13. Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ● Creating tables with Oracle Data Types: #: let's create some tables, using ORACLE DATA TYPES MariaDB [mydb]> CREATE TABLE TBL_CUSTOMER ( -> CUST_NUMBER INTEGER(10) NOT NULL, -> CUST_NAME VARCHAR2(60) NOT NULL, #: mapped out to MariaDB VARCHAR -> CUST_DATA_NASC DATE DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00', #: mapped out to MariaDB DATETIME -> PRIMARY KEY(CUST_NUMBER) -> ) ENGINE=InnoDB; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.009 sec) MariaDB [mydb]> CREATE TABLE TBL_RENTAL ( -> RENTAL_NUMBER INTEGER(10) NOT NULL, -> CAR_NUMBER INTEGER(10) NOT NULL, -> CUST_NUMBER INTEGER(10) NOT NULL, -> RENTAL_DT TIMESTAMP DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP(), -> CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY (CAR_NUMBER) REFERENCES TBL_CAR(CAR_NUMBER), -> CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY (CUST_NUMBER) REFERENCES TBL_CUSTOMER(CUST_NUMBER), -> PRIMARY KEY(RENTAL_NUMBER) -> ) ENGINE=InnoDB; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.008 sec)
  14. 14. Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ● Creating a SEQUENCE per table of our schema mydb; #: let's create the SEQUENCEs we're going to attach to tables MariaDB [mydb]> CREATE SEQUENCE SEQ_CAR MINVALUE 1 START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1 CACHE 0; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.006 sec) MariaDB [mydb]> CREATE SEQUENCE SEQ_CUSTOMER MINVALUE 1 START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1 CACHE 0; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.005 sec) MariaDB [mydb]> CREATE SEQUENCE SEQ_CAR_BRAND MINVALUE 1 START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1 CACHE 0; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.005 sec) MariaDB [mydb]> CREATE SEQUENCE SEQ_RENTAL MINVALUE 1 START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1 CACHE 0; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.006 sec)
  15. 15. Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ● PROCEDURE CREATION: let's create a procedure to add car brands! MariaDB [mydb]> DELIMITER / MariaDB [mydb]> CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE mydb.PROC_ADD_CAR_BRAND ( -> p_car_brand_descmydb.TBL_CAR_BRAND.CAR_BRAND_DESC%TYPE, -> p_car_brand_logomydb.TBL_CAR_BRAND.CAR_BRAND_LOGO%TYPE -> ) AS -> BEGIN -> IF ((p_car_brand_desc <> '') &&(p_car_brand_logo <> '')) THEN -> -- creating a start savepoint -> SAVEPOINT startpoint; #: creating an undo point into the local stream -> -- inserting the new row -> INSERT INTO TBL_CAR_BRAND(CAR_BRAND_NUMBER,CAR_BRAND_DESC,CAR_BRAND_LOGO) -> VALUES(SEQ_CAR_BRAND.NEXTVAL,p_car_brand_desc,p_car_brand_logo); -> ELSE -> SELECT 'You must provide the cars brand...' AS WARNING; -> END IF; -> EXCEPTION -> WHEN OTHERS THEN -> -- executing the exception -> SELECT 'Exception ' || TO_CHAR(SQLCODE)|| ' ' || SQLERRM AS EXCEPTION; -> -- rolling backup to the savepoint startpoint -> ROLLBACK TO startpoint; -> END; -> / Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.003 sec)
  16. 16. Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ● PROCEDURE CREATION: let's create a procedure to add customers! MariaDB [mydb]> DELIMITER / MariaDB [mydb]> CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE mydb.PROC_ADD_CUSTOMER ( -> p_customer_name mydb.TBL_CUSTOMER.CUST_NAME%TYPE, -> p_customer_data_nasc mydb.TBL_CUSTOMER.CUST_DATA_NASC%TYPE -> ) AS -> BEGIN -> IF ((p_customer_name <> '') &&(p_customer_data_nasc <> '0000-00-00 00:00:00')) THEN -> -- creating a start savepoint -> SAVEPOINT startpoint; -> -- inserting the new row -> INSERT INTO TBL_CUSTOMER(CUST_NUMBER,CUST_NAME,CUST_DATA_NASC) -> VALUES(SEQ_CUSTOMER.NEXTVAL,p_customer_name,p_customer_data_nasc); -> ELSE -> SELECT 'You must provide the customers information...' AS WARNING; -> END IF; -> EXCEPTION -> WHEN OTHERS THEN -> -- executing the exception -> SELECT 'Exception ' || SQLCODE || ' ' ||SQLERRM AS EXCEPTION; -> -- rolling backup to the savepoint startpoint -> ROLLBACK TO startpoint; -> END; -> / Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.003 sec)
  17. 17. Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ● PROCEDURE CALLS: let's add data to our database schema! #: car brands MariaDB [mydb]> CALL mydb.PROC_ADD_CAR_BRAND('Audi',md5('logo.') || '.jpg')/ Query OK, 1 row affected (0.004 sec) MariaDB [mydb]> SELECT * FROM TBL_CAR_BRAND/ +------------------+----------------+--------------------------------------+ | CAR_BRAND_NUMBER | CAR_BRAND_DESC | CAR_BRAND_LOGO | +------------------+----------------+--------------------------------------+ | 1 | Ferrari | 1f98cd1e57fbf3714f058ccf10fc9e9a.jpg | | 2 | Audi | 1f98cd1e57fbf3714f058ccf10fc9e9a.jpg | +------------------+----------------+--------------------------------------+ 2 rows in set (0.000 sec) #: customers MariaDB [mydb]> CALL mydb.PROC_ADD_CUSTOMER('Bianchi','1980-01-01 10:30:00')/ Query OK, 1 row affected (0.005 sec) MariaDB [mydb]> SELECT * FROM TBL_CUSTOMER/ +-------------+-----------------+---------------------+ | CUST_NUMBER | CUST_NAME | CUST_DATA_NASC | +-------------+-----------------+---------------------+ | 1 | Bianchi, Wagner | 1980-01-01 10:30:00 | +-------------+-----------------+---------------------+ 1 row in set (0.000 sec)
  18. 18. Agenda ● Why migrate? ● PL/SQL syntax in MariaDB ○ How to enable ORACLE SQL_MODE ○ Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ○ Covering the gap ○ What's coming next ● Transact-SQL migration to MariaDB ○ Toolkit ○ Speeding up migrations ● Live demo
  19. 19. Technology
  20. 20. • Features common with all major commercial DBMS: – Relational database, SQL:92, SQL:2003 – ACID compliant, fully transactional engine – Security features, data-at-rest encryption etc. – Variety of data types, 4-byte Unicode etc. – Tables, views – Indices, PK’s, FK’s, check constraints, ... – Replication with various synchrony options – Window functions – Common Table Expressions (CTE’s) – Functions, procedures – Triggers → We have all essential features of a relational database system MariaDB vs. commercial systems • Advanced features specific to MariaDB, at eye level to legacy DBMS: – Multi-node synchronous replication with Galera, working over WAN – In-order parallelized asynchronous replication – Semi-synchronous replication – Failovers with no write transaction loss – Asynchronous replication for flexible data center topologies • Our experts pay additional attention to semantic differences between DBMS: – Default values, e.g. TIMESTAMP – Sorting with NULL, collations – Choice of TA isolation level, locking vs. MVCC – Materialized query tables, views – Specific SQL constructs
  21. 21. MariaDB & Customer driven innovation 10.2 (examples) • Common Table Expressions • Catch All Partition (List) • Full Support for Default • Virtual Column Indexes • Pushdown Conditions • Multi-trigger Support • Max Length (Blob/Text) 10.3 (examples) • EXCEPT / INTERSECT • Instance Add Column • ROW OF • Sequences • User Defined Types • Condition Pushdowns > HAVING into WHERE • and many more
  22. 22. High Availability with MariaDB Clustering (Galera) Replication Node Data Center Node Data Center Multi-master, Synchronous • Millisecond latency • Dynamic topology changes • Quorum-based consistency • Load balancing and failover (MaxScale) Master-slave, Multi-source • Asynchronous or semi-synchronous • Multiple replication threads • Concurrent replication streams • Delayed replication (configurable) Slave Data Center Master Data Center Slave Failover Master Slave Data Center Node Data Center
  23. 23. MariaDB products we build upon MARIADB TX (SERVER) Enterprise-grade secure, highly available and scalable relational database with a modern, extensible architecture MARIADB MAXSCALE MARIADB AX (COLUMNSTORE) Next-generation database proxy that manages security, scalability and high availability in scale-out deployments Columnar storage engine for massively parallel distributed query execution and data loading
  24. 24. MariaDB MaxScale: Intelligent Data Gateway Binlog, Avro, JSON,CSV Binlog, Avro, JSON,CSV ● Gateway from OLTP database to external data stores ● Automated failover, load balancing, CDC, replication, data masking, DDoS protection
  25. 25. Process
  26. 26. Migration process with MariaDB • Migration project planning, migration doing, and QA: – Deepened analysis of existing database application and IT infrastructure • Migration of schema • Migration of interfaces to other systems • Choice of the right tools • Analysis of slow-running queries • Tuning opportunities – MariaDB migration expertise, validation of application behavior • Performance, load, parallelism tests • User Acceptance Tests (UAT) • System Integration Tests (SIT) • Migration process: – Migration Questionnaire – Migration Assessment – Migration project planning, migration doing, and QA Switchovers, forward and rollback planning, points of no return – Pilot phase We help to bootstrap migration capabilities inside of customer’s team
  27. 27. • Benefits of this service: – Ensure a precise, non-biased, externally objective analysis of your applications – Minimize the risk of wrong planning and non-purposeful activities – Ensure a purposeful, straightforward procedure, and prioritization of migration steps – Provide a cost estimation for actual migration steps – Benefit from the broad experience and deep technical insight of MariaDB consultants, comprising knowledge in both MariaDB as well as legacy DBMS, e.g. Oracle, Sybase, SQL Server • Migration Assessment Package (8-10 days) – Our consultants analyze your database applications – Target architecture is developed based on MariaDB and MaxScale and further products if necessary – Cost estimation – Findings can be refined later on during actual migration project Migration Assessment
  28. 28. How to choose a good migration candidate • What requires further analysis: – One-vendor compounds w. tight coupling, e.g. • SharePoint with SQL Server – Applications highly dependent on DBMS-specific constructs, e.g. • Functions monitoring of DBMS internals • Parallelism issues etc. – Documentation of semantic differences between MariaDB and Oracle types is available • Customers can work with MariaDB to resolve some of the documented differences where necessary • Good candidates for a migration: – Application stacks where the DBMS is used by well-documented interfaces, e.g. • Oracle with Java, C++ • Sybase with Java, C++ • SQL Server with PHP • Vendor-neutral, as long as they maintain clear or documented interfaces – We are open to work with new vendors who do not support MariaDB yet • Application logic remains unchanged → We adapt the data access layer
  29. 29. Agenda ● Why migrate? ● PL/SQL syntax in MariaDB ○ How to enable ORACLE SQL_MODE ○ Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ○ Covering the gap ○ What's coming next ● Transact-SQL migration to MariaDB ○ Toolkit ○ Speeding up migrations ● Live demo
  30. 30. • Achievements so far: – Highly automated schema, constraints and index migration – SQL_MODE = ORACLE – Syntax of PL/SQL integrated into MariaDB server – Solutions / workarounds for complex SQL constructs, e.g. • CONNECT BY - with CTEs • 1NF TABLE OF procedure results - with temporary tables / native JSON • NESTED attributes / tables - with native JSON in MariaDB – Tool-aided data migration and validation • Upcoming enhancements: – Automatic conversion of deeper semantics • e.g. DATE_FORMAT, some string functions, ... – Enhanced tooling and templates for migrating advanced SQL functionalities Making migrations from Oracle easier than ever
  31. 31. Agenda ● Why migrate? ● PL/SQL syntax in MariaDB ○ How to enable ORACLE SQL_MODE ○ Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ○ Covering the gap ○ What's coming next ● Transact-SQL migration to MariaDB ○ Toolkit ○ Speeding up migrations ● Live demo
  32. 32. • Applicable to legacy systems: – Sybase – SQL Server • Typical fields of interest: – Financial applications – Insurance • Tool-aided migrations: – Automated schema conversion with SQLines SQL Converter – Benefit from usually closer SQL dialect in queries – Semi-automatic stored procedure conversion with approx. 10-20% manual work – Tool-aided data migration and validation Tool-aided migrations from Transact-SQL
  33. 33. Agenda ● Why migrate? ● PL/SQL syntax in MariaDB ○ How to enable ORACLE SQL_MODE ○ Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ○ Covering the gap ○ What's coming next ● Transact-SQL migration to MariaDB ○ Toolkit ○ Speeding up migrations ● Live demo
  34. 34. • Applicable to IT landscapes with hundreds to thousands of database applications • During Migration Assessment, we classify existing applications according to: – complexity of features – complexity of control of flow – programming style • We conduct a POC migration of a mid-size, mid-complexity example application – as representative to a classification group as possible • Our tooling is then adapted to this customer-specific class of applications – Migration pace increases dramatically – The customer is able to migrate massively by himself Scaling out migrations from Transact-SQL
  35. 35. Agenda ● Why migrate? ● PL/SQL syntax in MariaDB ○ How to enable ORACLE SQL_MODE ○ Supported ORACLE and PL/SQL syntax ○ Covering the gap ○ What's coming next ● Transact-SQL migration to MariaDB ○ Toolkit ○ Speeding up migrations ● Live demo
  36. 36. Thank you! wagner.bianchi@mariadb.com alexander.bienemann@mariadb.com How can we help you in migrating to MariaDB?

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