Addressing Climate Change: SMUD’s Goals & Challenges 10th Generation Summit February 25-26, 2013 Intercontinental Hotel Da...
Outline• SMUD Overview and history of  Investment• Climate Change Impacts & Policy• Renewables Solution• Energy Efficiency...
S U OverviewSMUD O e e• Publicly owned utility formed in  1946• Governed by independent  locally elected governing Board  ...
History of Investment inSustainable Energy•   1960’s constructed Upper American River Hydro Project                       ...
Motivations/Impacts of Climate Change                            Major impacts to Planet,                             Majo...
ales (MWh)                               Electricity Sa                        Retail E20% below 1990 Emissions Today, 30%...
SMUD Board Policy on                    Sustainable Energy• Sustainable Power Supply reduces SMUD’s long-term greenhouse g...
Board Greenhouse Gas Emissions Targets for SMUD Retail Load through                                                       ...
Meeting our Goals – RPS, EE• To meet our carbon objectives SMUD’s                       objectives,  Board has adopted a 3...
33% RPS plus 4%                     Greenergy in 202020% RPS and 3% Greenergy in 2010
Solar Energy Growth at SMUD                 180                 160                                    Installed and Forec...
PV Issues For SMUD                Average 15 Minute Interval Peak Demand ZEH vs. Non ZEH July, 2005        MW             ...
Wind Intermittency                                          Correlation = 59.2%                                          C...
R&D Integration Strategies– New Knowledge (variability,feeder penetration limits, hi-penetration impacts, etc.)– System Pl...
SMUD s  SMUD’s Energy Efficiency Programs• Programs initiated in 1970’s, have been aggressively      g                    ...
SMUD s                     SMUD’s EE Program Success                                                                   kWh...
GWh Sa                                        aved/MW Reduced/$ Spent       0                              50             ...
Components Of EE Portfolio                              0%                          0%                         1%         ...
SMUD Projected Resource Mix Through 2050                                                        20,000                    ...
Role of the Cap and Trade      Program and AB 32      P           d• SMUD supported the development of AB 32 and the  stat...
Conclusions• SMUD has had a long history of investment in efficiency and  renewables to benefit our customers and reduce o...
Thank You!23   3/4/2013
Attaining Sustainable and Balanced Power Supply while Achieving Long-Term GHG Goals - Paul Lau, Sacramento Municipal Utili...
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Attaining Sustainable and Balanced Power Supply while Achieving Long-Term GHG Goals - Paul Lau, Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD)

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Paul Lau, Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) - Speaker at the marcus evans Generation Summit held in Dallas, TX, February 25-26, 2013 delivered his presentation entitled Attaining Sustainable and Balanced Power Supply while Achieving Long-Term GHG Goals

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Attaining Sustainable and Balanced Power Supply while Achieving Long-Term GHG Goals - Paul Lau, Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD)

  1. 1. Addressing Climate Change: SMUD’s Goals & Challenges 10th Generation Summit February 25-26, 2013 Intercontinental Hotel Dallas, TXPowering forward. Together.
  2. 2. Outline• SMUD Overview and history of Investment• Climate Change Impacts & Policy• Renewables Solution• Energy Efficiency Solution• Challenges & Opportunities
  3. 3. S U OverviewSMUD O e e• Publicly owned utility formed in 1946• Governed by independent locally elected governing Board of 7 members• Serves electricity to 1.3 million y people in Sacramento region• 2,100 Employees• Peak Demand of 3,300 MW• Annual Sales ~11,000,000 MWh
  4. 4. History of Investment inSustainable Energy• 1960’s constructed Upper American River Hydro Project pp y j• 1970’s began Energy Efficiency Programs• 1984 1st Utility Scale Solar PV Project• 1989 Closed Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant• 1990’s 1st CO2 inventory Investment in 300 MW of cogeneration, initial 1990 s inventory, cogeneration investment in wind energy, launch of rooftop solar program, Greenergy program• 2001 Board-adopted 20% RPS, helped launch California Climate Action Registry• 2004 1st entity to certify emissions with CCAR, 15 MW Solano wind farm completed• 2006 completed 500 MW Cosumnes, one of most efficient natural gas power plants in the country• 2007-8 adopted 15% EE goal, 33% RPS, 90% Carbon reduction goal• 2010 only major utility to achieve 20% RPS, 100 MW solar FiT• 2012 finished buildout of windfarm to 225 MW, RPS contracting to achieve 33% RPS fi i h d AMI d l hi RPS, finished deploymentt4 3/4/2013
  5. 5. Motivations/Impacts of Climate Change Major impacts to Planet,  Major impacts to Planet State, Sacramento Limited Conflicting  Investments Leadership Empowered  p with Options to Address  Issue5 3/4/2013
  6. 6. ales (MWh) Electricity Sa Retail E20% below 1990 Emissions Today, 30% below by 2020below by 2020
  7. 7. SMUD Board Policy on Sustainable Energy• Sustainable Power Supply reduces SMUD’s long-term greenhouse gas emissions from generation ofElectricity to 10% of its 1990 carbon dioxide emissionlevels by 2050 (<350,000 metric tonnes/year), whileassuring reliability of the system; minimizingenvironmental impacts on land, habitat, water quality,and air quality; and maintaining a competitiveposition relative to other California electricityproviders. T guide SMUD i it resource evaluation and id To id in its l ti dinvestment, the Board sets the following interim goals:Year Net Greenhouse Gas Emissions (metric tonnes)2012 2,608,0002020 2,318,000 7
  8. 8. Board Greenhouse Gas Emissions Targets for SMUD Retail Load through  2050 ‐ 90% below 1990 levels 2050 ‐ 90% below 1990 levels 4,000,000 Cogen Emissions es CO2 Cosumnes Emissions 3,500,000 Gas Emissions ‐Metric Tonne Emissions History and Projections 3,000,000 30% below 1990 levels in 2020 2,572,209  2 572 209 2,500,000 2,319,928  2,000,000 2,028,748  ‐ 90% below  90% below Greenhouse G 1,698,889  1990 levels 1,500,000 1,361,667  1,000,000 1,024,444 SMUD Total G 687,222  500,000 350,000  0 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020 2022 2024 2026 2028 2030 2032 2034 2036 2038 2040 2042 2044 2046 2048 2050
  9. 9. Meeting our Goals – RPS, EE• To meet our carbon objectives SMUD’s objectives, Board has adopted a 33% by 2020 Renewable Portfolio Standard goal goal, extending our 20% by 2010 goal, consistent with state policy• In addition, the Board adopted more aggressive energy efficiency goals of ff f 15% of retail load by 2023
  10. 10. 33% RPS plus 4%  Greenergy in 202020% RPS and 3% Greenergy in 2010
  11. 11. Solar Energy Growth at SMUD 180 160 Installed and Forecast Solar Capacity Installed and Forecast Solar Capacity 140 120 SB1, Actual & Planned 100 tts Non-SB1, Actual & Planned 80 Megawat 60 FIT 40 20 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Year
  12. 12. PV Issues For SMUD Average 15 Minute Interval Peak Demand ZEH vs. Non ZEH July, 2005 MW Avg High temp 98 degrees F Avg Min Temp 65 degees F kW • PV coupled with high3,500 System Peak MW Average of ZEH Net Grid Load (kW) 2.9 kW 3.5 efficiency measures can3,000 Average of Power Produced by PV (kW) Average of Non-ZEH Net Grid Load (kW) Non ZEH 3 reduce home peak load by2,500 Avg Gross Load (Kw) 2.5 55% 2.2 kW; 24% 22,000 1.6 kW 1.5 • Significant shift still1,500 1.2 kW; 25% 1.3 kW; 55% 1 between solar peak and 0.5 system peak t k1,000 0 • Intermittent production 500 -0.4 kW; 125% -0.5 resulting from partly cloudy 0 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 -1 conditions AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM Time
  13. 13. Wind Intermittency Correlation = 59.2% C l ti 59 2% 1800 90 • SMUD’s peak load driven tion (MWh/Day) 1700 80 1600 70 by hot summerSMUD Load (MW) 1500 60 1400 50 temperatures p d Wind Product 1300 40 1200 30 • Wind resource weakest 1100 1000 20 10 on hottest days 900 0 1 31 61 91 121 151 181 211 Day of the Year 241 271 301 331 361 • Comparing daily and Daily Ave 2002-03 Load Daily Wind Production (MWh/Day) hourly system load with Solano Wind Plant 3000 9.0 90 production illustrates 2500 7.5 mismatch Wind Production (MW) System Load (MW) 2000 6.0 1500 4.5 • Must rely on firming 1000 500 3.0 1.5 resources to address 0 0.0 mismatch and ensure 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 7/22/03 S t Hour System L d Load Ave. Jun-Aug A J A 2003 Wi d P d ti Wind Production system stability
  14. 14. R&D Integration Strategies– New Knowledge (variability,feeder penetration limits, hi-penetration impacts, etc.)– System Planning (i.e., addedflexible reserves)– New Modeling & SimulationTools– New & Improved Forecasting Methods– New Inverter Technology (e.g., volt/var control)– Integration with Smart Grid (communications & control) and other New Techs (PEVs, DSM, etc.)– New, Cost-Competitive Storage Options– 21st Century Electricity Distribution System thataccommodates two-way power flow two way
  15. 15. SMUD s SMUD’s Energy Efficiency Programs• Programs initiated in 1970’s, have been aggressively g , gg y deploying EE for nearly 4 decades• Current levels are just shy of 1.5% of customer retail sales per year, with a goal of attaining th t l l ith l f tt i i that level b 2020 l by• Programs offer everything from lightbulb and appliance rebates to whole building retrofits and Zero-net-Energy Zero net Energy approaches• Emerging Technology R&D and enhanced incentives test and d i new t h l i t market d drive technologies to k t
  16. 16. SMUD s SMUD’s EE Program Success kWh per capita13,00012,00011,000 CA10,000 US 9,000 9 000 SMUD 8,000 7,000 6,000 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
  17. 17. GWh Sa aved/MW Reduced/$ Spent 0 50 100 150 20011977 2501978119791119801981119821119831984119851119861987119881119891990119911199211993119941199511996119971 31.5 MW 157 GWh $43.80M 1998119991200022001220022200322004220052200622007220082 (1.5% Scenario – 2008 to 2020)20092201022011220122 $32.77M  27.5M 2013220142 154.3 GWh 20152201622017220182 History (and Future) Of SMUD Energy Efficiency Portfolio2019220202 $M MW GWh
  18. 18. Components Of EE Portfolio 0% 0% 1% Retail Lighting 0% Prescriptive Lighting Incentives 4% 2% 4% Customized Incentives ‐ Lighting i d i i hi 5% 32% Customized Incentives ‐ Non‐Lighting 8% Business and Consumer Electronics 9% Express Efficiency Incentives Home Electricity Reports Home Electricity Reports Appliance Efficiency 9% 18% Commercial Savings By Design 8% Equipment Efficiency Distributor Incentives Shade Trees (Sacramento Shade) Residential Solar Smart Energy Efficiency Multi‐Family Retrofit
  19. 19. SMUD Projected Resource Mix Through 2050 20,000  EE/DSM ‐ Board Targets to 2020 Unknown Generation pply GWH 18,000  37% 2020 Renewables Total Retail Demand Hydro (UARP + WAPA) Natural Gas Generation Serving SMUD Retail Demand Allowable Gas Generation with Wholesale Sales 16,000  16 000 y Demand and Resource Sup 14,000  Energy Gap 12,000  12,000 10,000  8,000  jected Energy 6,000  4,000 Total Proj 2,000  ‐ 200 9 201 1 201 3 201 5 201 7 201 9 202 1 202 3 202 5 202 7 202 9 203 1 203 3 203 5 203 7 203 9 204 1 204 3 204 5 204 7 204 9
  20. 20. Role of the Cap and Trade Program and AB 32 P d• SMUD supported the development of AB 32 and the state’s C and T d program, which reduce the ’ Cap d Trade hi h d h state’s GhG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020• 1st Auction is November 15th, 2012, program covers electricity and industry beginning in 2013, transportation and natural gas beginning in 2015• We are well positioned to comply with the p g p py program’s carbon reduction objectives given our RPS and EE goals• We are hopeful that the p g p program creates appropriate pp p incentives for reducing statewide emissions while providing benefits to the economy through clean tech growth
  21. 21. Conclusions• SMUD has had a long history of investment in efficiency and renewables to benefit our customers and reduce our impact on the environment• Many challenges arise as renewables (e.g., variability & integration, transmission to access new, high density resources) and efficiency ( g , developing new, emerging ) y (e.g., p g , g g efficiency technologies) grow as sources to reduce GhG emissions• The future requires continued dedication and new solutions such as th S h the Smart Grid t enable significant renewable t G id to bl i ifi t bl penetrations and emerging energy efficiency solutions• Achieving this transition while maintaining our customer satisfaction will be challenging but SMUD staff are up to the challenging, challenge!
  22. 22. Thank You!23 3/4/2013

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