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PREPARED BY: MR. MARCO T. SANTOS
The birth of high school paper in
the country
The birth of Manila City Schools
Newspaper
Formal Introduction of
Journalism
Cooperation and
Technical Skills
“NECESSARY”
RECEIVE FROM
LATEST
News, Comments,
Feature Stories,
and Literary
Articles Promptly
School
Paper
Student’s Life
Student’s
Writer
Student’s
Writer
 In the city schools of Manila, at least one every grading period is being issued.
 Highschool student publication are almost as old as the Philippine public school
system itself.
 Student publication was introduced in the country shortly after its wide adoption
in the American high schools and colleges.
 In the Philippines, the first regularly issued printed high school paper was the La
Union High School in 1923.
 By School Year 2004-2005 more school papers both in high school and elementary
have greatly increased.
 It stated further that articles purporting to be written by the pupils should be
solely the product of their efforts, the assistance of the teacher being limited only
to criticism.
The First school paper in Manila public high school
(now Araullo HighSchool) was born in the school
year 1911-1912 this was the The Coconut, a
mimeographed paper, it was edited by Carlos P.
Romulo.
 First school paper in the City Schools of Manila was published in School
Year 1911-1912, formal classroom instruction in high school journalism
began only in 1952.
 That was the time that Mrs. Sarah England, an American teacher of Mapa
High School, experimented with the teaching of journalism.
 Since it proved successful, the other four existing high schools in the city
followed suit.
 These were the Araullo, Torres, Arellano, and Abad Santos high schools, in
that order. They formally offered journalism as a vocational subject
holding classes on a daily double period throughout the school year.
 Since then, journalism has been under the supervision of English
supervisors, but the grades are considered vocational subjects.
In Journalism classes, the budding writers are
trained to write various types of news, features
stories, interviews, speech reports, editorials and
editorial columns, sports stories, critical reports,
interpretative and depth news, development news,
and other forms of journalistic writing.
Secure 2 old school papers of your school and
study the history, growth, and insights of
development of journalism in your school.
Compare them and point out the differences
of the two.
Suggest some improvements to be made by
the staff.
SUB-TOPICS:
Scope of Journalism
Function of the Campus Paper
National and Campus Newspaper
Compared
Sections or Part pf a Campus
Paper
 The word journal comes
from the Latin word
diurnal which means
“DAILY”
 In ancient rome, short
bulletins of battles, fires,
and elections are being
compiled.
 Journalism defines as “the
occupation of writing for
publications.”
 Journalism is divided
into three areas,
namely: written, oral
and visual.
 A periodicals defined
broadly that comes
out at regular
intervals
 An intervals – daily,
weekly, fortnightly,
monthly, bi-monthly,
quarterly, or annually.
Written Journalism/
Print Media
Oral Journalism/
Broadcast Media
Visual Journalism/
Film Media
Periodicals such as
newspaper and
magazines fall under
written journalism.
Radio and other
audio recordings
Television, movies
and documentaries
A campus paper is a
publication, either
mimeographed or
printed, put out by
staff members whose
names appear in the
masthead or editorial
box.
1. Provides an opportunity for interesting writing.
2. Gives students the opportunity to learn how to read the newspapers.
3. Acts as a stimulus to better work.
4. Serves as an outlet and motivation for journalistic writing.
5. Offers training in organization, business methods, commercial art,
salesmanship, bookkeeping, and business management.
6. Develops qualities of cooperation, tact, accuracy, tolerance, responsibility, and
leadership.
1. Informs the community on the work of the school.
2. Publishes school news.
3. Creates and expresses school opinion.
4. Makes known the achievements of the school.
5. Helps unify the school.
6. Encourages and stimulates worthwhile activities. 7. Develops right standard of
conduct.
8. Provides an outlet for student suggestions for the betterment of
the school.
9. Develops better interschool relationship.
10. Develops school spirit.
11. Develops cooperation between parents and the school.
You have to guess the name of the country just by combining
some pictures in the screen.
The first one who guess the correct name of the country will
have the point.
The student who will have the most points after the game will
be the winner.
The winner of this game will have an incentive.
A
A
S
A
O
F
A
1. Information function
2. Opinion function
3. Education function
4. Watchdog function
5. Laboratory function
6. Documentation function
7. Entertainment function
8. Developmental function
It informs the readers of events that
happened, that are happening, or that
will still happen.
Through the editorials and editorial columns, the
editor interprets the meaning of the news,
especially of the banner news, and gives his
opinion of important matters or of significant
events of the day
One of the most important functions of a
modern campus paper is to educate not only
the students but also the people in the
community.
Sex education and family planning which
used to be taboo in classrooms are now topics
of discussion by student writers in their
school organs.
The school paper acts as the
guardian of the students' rights.
It serves as the eyes of the readers.
It serves as the teaching tool for the
budding journalists. After they have
learned, for example, how to write
straight news stories, they cover school
activities and write the news for
publication.
Important school events and worthwhile
student accomplishments and achievements
are recorded in the school paper for
posterity's sake. Most present- day histories
have been researched from old files of
newspapers.
The school paper, like an interesting book,
keeps the reader company especially when he
is alone. Most human interest stories are
very interesting to read.
The purpose of journalism is to provide
citizens with the information they need to
make the best possible decisions about their
lives, their communities, their societies, and
their governments.
Local news
Foreign news
Dateline news
Weather news
Index
News that
takes place
within the
country
News that
takes place
outside the
country/
An out-of-town news story. It
is introduces by a dateline
which states the place from
which the story was reported.
The date and the sources of
the material if not written by
the local staff, as Tokyo,
Japan, Jan. 25.
 It indicates the city the
journalist was in when he or
she reported on the story
Usually a boxed
forecast of the area,
sometimes includes the
temperature, wind
directions, and
velocities. Extremes on
weather are reported
as more detailed news
stories.
A slug line
indicating an
important inside
page story and the
page where it is
found.
 Banner – The principal headline bearing the boldest and biggest type. It is the
title of the most important news of the day.
 Running head – headline made up of two or more lines.
 Headline – The title of any new story. The word headline is used only for titles of
news stories.
 Deck – A subordinate headline place immediately below its mother headline, also
known as bank or readout.
 News story- The whole story on an event composed of the lead and the text which
is the elaboration of the lead.
Consists of the page number, date of publication, and
name of the newspaper, usually written on top of the page.
This is also found in the other pages.
The editorial box
containing the logo,
names of the staff
members and position
in the staff,
subscription rate, the
publisher, and the other
pertinent data about
the newspaper.
A commentary written by
any of the editions who
comments or gives the
opinion of the staff or of
the whole paper on
various subjects. It is the
stand of the paper.
 A personal opinion written by the
columnist himself. Like the editorial
proper, it may attack, teach,
entertain, or appeal depending upon
its purpose.
Usually a caricature emphasizing a simple point.
Usually humorous, it has the function of the
editorial. It stands by itself and is not a complement
of the editorial proper.
A short statement or
quoted saying placed
at the end of an
editorial column or
editorial to drive
home a message.
A letter send in by
the readers giving
their personal
views on certain
aspects.
 1-15 QUIZ AND ACTIVITY AFTER
 Letterpress Printing
News Define
Elements of News
Types of News Stories
It simply define as an oral or written report of a past,
present, or future events.
It should be factual, truthful, accurate, unbiased, and
interesting.
A news story may be
appealing to a particular
reader for any or all of the
following elements:
1. Conflict
2. Immediacy or timelines
3. Proximity or nearness
4. Prominence
5. Significance
6. Names
7. Drama
8. Oddity or unusualness
9. Romance and adventure
10.Sex
11.Progress
12.Animals
13.Number
14.Emotion
This may involve physical or mental conflict – man
versus man, man versus animals, man versus
nature or man versus himself.
Stories of war, athletic meets, and journalism
contests are example of conflicts.
This element emphasizes the newest angle of
the story.
The more recent the event, the more
interesting it is to the reader.
It may refer to geographical nearness as well as to
nearness of kinship or interest.
Example, to a Filipino reader, news about a cholera
epidemic in Asia concerns him more than the same kind of
epidemic in Europe.
Some people are more prominent than others by reasons of
wealth, social position, or achievements.
Prominence may also refer to places.
Example: The sudden death of Presidential candidate
Fernando Poe Jr. hugged national and international
headlines for many months.
Whatever is significant to the life of an
individual is interesting to him.
Example: War, increase of oil, Inflation and
etc.,
Important names make important news.
Also, the more names there are in the
story, the better.
This adds color to the story. The more pictures the
background and the more dramatic the actions are,
the more appealing the story is to the reader.
Anything that moves a reader to tears, or to
laughter is a good news.
This refers to the strange or unnatural events,
objects, persons, and places.
An odd story is interesting bot because of news
value but because of the human-interest side of it.
Example: A dead man comes to life, finds himself in
a coffin, sits up and dies again of heart attack.
The romance of James Reid and Nadine Lustre had
hugged headlines for many months.
Romance may be experienced with other things.
Example: Hardships, interesting story of the individual,
and plot twist of the couple.
Since the dawn of history, sex has always interested man.
Stories of sex are usually related to stories of romance,
marriage, divorce and the varied activities of men with
women.
But the element of sex is involved when a woman like
Gloria Macapagal Arroyo is elected president of a country
or Kevin Balot is the fist transgender who won a crown
overseas.
The onward and forward march of civilization or the
progress of a country is chronically step by step in the
newspaper.
The trend today is towards development communication.
Stories of animals, especially those with talents are
good reading matter because of their human-
interest value.
Example: Heroism, Talent, or rarity,
Sweeptakes numbers, vital statistics, election results,
scores in games, casualties, fatalities, price of goods, and
ages of women make good news.
All the other elements of news mentioned above appeal to
the emotion.
But the term emotion here includes the various human
responses such as the innate desire for food, clothing,
shelter, the universal interest in children, animals, and
nature and the natural feeling of love, sympathy,
generosity, fear, hatred, and jealousy.
 Choose a Recent, Newsworthy Event or Topic.
 Conduct Timely, In-Person Interviews with Witnesses.
 Establish the “Four Main Ws”
 Construct Your Piece.
 Research Additional Facts and Figures.
 It needs to be punchy, include the most important facts and convey what the story
is about.
 Headline (Heading) The headline is the title of the news article. ...
 Byline. This line tells who is writing the article. ...
 Location. This is usually placed at the beginning of the article in bold print. ...
 Lead Paragraph(s) ...
 Supporting Paragraph(s)
 To begin writing a news article, you need to research the topic you will be writing about
extensively. In order to have a credible, well written, well-structured article, you have to know
the topic well.
 If you’ve ever written a research paper you understand the work that goes into learning about
your topic. The first phase of writing a news article or editorial is pretty similar.
 Begin by asking yourself the “5 W’s” (sometimes “6 W’s”)
 Who - who was involved?
 What - what happened?
 Where - where did it happen?
 Why - why did it happen?
 When - when did it happen?
 How - how did it happen?
 Once you can clearly answer the “5 W’s”, jot down a list of all the pertinent facts
and information that needs to be included in the article. Organize your facts into
three groups:
 1) those that need to be included in the article.
 2) those that are interesting but not vital.
 3) those that are related but not important to the purpose of the article.
Your outline, and subsequently your article, should be
structured like an inverted triangle. The inverted triangle
allows you to build your story so that the most important
information is at the top.
In order to write a great news article, you need to know
exactly who you are writing for. Your audience will dictate
the voice and tone of your article and help you to know
what you should include.
Ask yourself the “5 W's” again, but this time in relation to
your audience.
 Why is this article unique to you? What is your voice? These questions will help
you to make your news article unique and something that only you could write.
 Even if you are covering a popular story or topic that others are writing about,
look for an angle that will make this one yours.
 Do you have a personal experience that relates to your topic? Maybe you know
someone who is an expert that you can interview.
 When writing a news article, interviewing people and getting a firsthand source
on your topic can be invaluable. And while reaching out to people and asking for
an interview may seem daunting, it can greatly affect the credibility and authority
of your article.
 People usually like to talk about personal experiences, especially if it will be
featured somewhere, like your news article.
 When you do interview people you need to follow a few rules
INSTRUCTIONS:
This activity will test your skills in presenting a news.
You must present at least 5 news inside the campus. (be
aware of do’s and don’ts)
Provide a PPT (Power Point Presentation), by providing
your headlines and some details and pictures of the
news you’ve gathered.
The presentation must only performed with a maximum
of 15 minutes of duration.
The reporter must be in a corporate attire.
This presentation will be held at room 415 old building
at exactly 9:30am.
A1-Campus Journalism.pptx

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A1-Campus Journalism.pptx

  • 1. PREPARED BY: MR. MARCO T. SANTOS
  • 2. The birth of high school paper in the country The birth of Manila City Schools Newspaper Formal Introduction of Journalism
  • 3. Cooperation and Technical Skills “NECESSARY” RECEIVE FROM LATEST News, Comments, Feature Stories, and Literary Articles Promptly School Paper Student’s Life Student’s Writer Student’s Writer
  • 4.  In the city schools of Manila, at least one every grading period is being issued.  Highschool student publication are almost as old as the Philippine public school system itself.  Student publication was introduced in the country shortly after its wide adoption in the American high schools and colleges.  In the Philippines, the first regularly issued printed high school paper was the La Union High School in 1923.  By School Year 2004-2005 more school papers both in high school and elementary have greatly increased.  It stated further that articles purporting to be written by the pupils should be solely the product of their efforts, the assistance of the teacher being limited only to criticism.
  • 5. The First school paper in Manila public high school (now Araullo HighSchool) was born in the school year 1911-1912 this was the The Coconut, a mimeographed paper, it was edited by Carlos P. Romulo.
  • 6.  First school paper in the City Schools of Manila was published in School Year 1911-1912, formal classroom instruction in high school journalism began only in 1952.  That was the time that Mrs. Sarah England, an American teacher of Mapa High School, experimented with the teaching of journalism.  Since it proved successful, the other four existing high schools in the city followed suit.  These were the Araullo, Torres, Arellano, and Abad Santos high schools, in that order. They formally offered journalism as a vocational subject holding classes on a daily double period throughout the school year.  Since then, journalism has been under the supervision of English supervisors, but the grades are considered vocational subjects.
  • 7. In Journalism classes, the budding writers are trained to write various types of news, features stories, interviews, speech reports, editorials and editorial columns, sports stories, critical reports, interpretative and depth news, development news, and other forms of journalistic writing.
  • 8. Secure 2 old school papers of your school and study the history, growth, and insights of development of journalism in your school. Compare them and point out the differences of the two. Suggest some improvements to be made by the staff.
  • 9.
  • 10. SUB-TOPICS: Scope of Journalism Function of the Campus Paper National and Campus Newspaper Compared Sections or Part pf a Campus Paper  The word journal comes from the Latin word diurnal which means “DAILY”  In ancient rome, short bulletins of battles, fires, and elections are being compiled.  Journalism defines as “the occupation of writing for publications.”
  • 11.  Journalism is divided into three areas, namely: written, oral and visual.  A periodicals defined broadly that comes out at regular intervals  An intervals – daily, weekly, fortnightly, monthly, bi-monthly, quarterly, or annually. Written Journalism/ Print Media Oral Journalism/ Broadcast Media Visual Journalism/ Film Media Periodicals such as newspaper and magazines fall under written journalism. Radio and other audio recordings Television, movies and documentaries
  • 12. A campus paper is a publication, either mimeographed or printed, put out by staff members whose names appear in the masthead or editorial box.
  • 13. 1. Provides an opportunity for interesting writing. 2. Gives students the opportunity to learn how to read the newspapers. 3. Acts as a stimulus to better work. 4. Serves as an outlet and motivation for journalistic writing. 5. Offers training in organization, business methods, commercial art, salesmanship, bookkeeping, and business management. 6. Develops qualities of cooperation, tact, accuracy, tolerance, responsibility, and leadership.
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  • 18.
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  • 20. 1. Informs the community on the work of the school. 2. Publishes school news. 3. Creates and expresses school opinion. 4. Makes known the achievements of the school. 5. Helps unify the school. 6. Encourages and stimulates worthwhile activities. 7. Develops right standard of conduct. 8. Provides an outlet for student suggestions for the betterment of the school. 9. Develops better interschool relationship. 10. Develops school spirit. 11. Develops cooperation between parents and the school.
  • 21. You have to guess the name of the country just by combining some pictures in the screen. The first one who guess the correct name of the country will have the point. The student who will have the most points after the game will be the winner. The winner of this game will have an incentive.
  • 22. A
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  • 25. A
  • 26. S
  • 27. A
  • 28. O
  • 29. F
  • 30. A
  • 31. 1. Information function 2. Opinion function 3. Education function 4. Watchdog function 5. Laboratory function 6. Documentation function 7. Entertainment function 8. Developmental function
  • 32. It informs the readers of events that happened, that are happening, or that will still happen.
  • 33. Through the editorials and editorial columns, the editor interprets the meaning of the news, especially of the banner news, and gives his opinion of important matters or of significant events of the day
  • 34. One of the most important functions of a modern campus paper is to educate not only the students but also the people in the community. Sex education and family planning which used to be taboo in classrooms are now topics of discussion by student writers in their school organs.
  • 35. The school paper acts as the guardian of the students' rights. It serves as the eyes of the readers.
  • 36. It serves as the teaching tool for the budding journalists. After they have learned, for example, how to write straight news stories, they cover school activities and write the news for publication.
  • 37. Important school events and worthwhile student accomplishments and achievements are recorded in the school paper for posterity's sake. Most present- day histories have been researched from old files of newspapers.
  • 38. The school paper, like an interesting book, keeps the reader company especially when he is alone. Most human interest stories are very interesting to read.
  • 39. The purpose of journalism is to provide citizens with the information they need to make the best possible decisions about their lives, their communities, their societies, and their governments.
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  • 41.
  • 42. Local news Foreign news Dateline news Weather news Index
  • 45. An out-of-town news story. It is introduces by a dateline which states the place from which the story was reported. The date and the sources of the material if not written by the local staff, as Tokyo, Japan, Jan. 25.  It indicates the city the journalist was in when he or she reported on the story
  • 46. Usually a boxed forecast of the area, sometimes includes the temperature, wind directions, and velocities. Extremes on weather are reported as more detailed news stories.
  • 47. A slug line indicating an important inside page story and the page where it is found.
  • 48.  Banner – The principal headline bearing the boldest and biggest type. It is the title of the most important news of the day.  Running head – headline made up of two or more lines.  Headline – The title of any new story. The word headline is used only for titles of news stories.  Deck – A subordinate headline place immediately below its mother headline, also known as bank or readout.  News story- The whole story on an event composed of the lead and the text which is the elaboration of the lead.
  • 49.
  • 50. Consists of the page number, date of publication, and name of the newspaper, usually written on top of the page. This is also found in the other pages.
  • 51. The editorial box containing the logo, names of the staff members and position in the staff, subscription rate, the publisher, and the other pertinent data about the newspaper.
  • 52. A commentary written by any of the editions who comments or gives the opinion of the staff or of the whole paper on various subjects. It is the stand of the paper.
  • 53.
  • 54.  A personal opinion written by the columnist himself. Like the editorial proper, it may attack, teach, entertain, or appeal depending upon its purpose.
  • 55. Usually a caricature emphasizing a simple point. Usually humorous, it has the function of the editorial. It stands by itself and is not a complement of the editorial proper.
  • 56. A short statement or quoted saying placed at the end of an editorial column or editorial to drive home a message.
  • 57. A letter send in by the readers giving their personal views on certain aspects.
  • 58.  1-15 QUIZ AND ACTIVITY AFTER
  • 59.
  • 61. News Define Elements of News Types of News Stories
  • 62. It simply define as an oral or written report of a past, present, or future events. It should be factual, truthful, accurate, unbiased, and interesting.
  • 63. A news story may be appealing to a particular reader for any or all of the following elements: 1. Conflict 2. Immediacy or timelines 3. Proximity or nearness 4. Prominence 5. Significance 6. Names 7. Drama 8. Oddity or unusualness 9. Romance and adventure 10.Sex 11.Progress 12.Animals 13.Number 14.Emotion
  • 64. This may involve physical or mental conflict – man versus man, man versus animals, man versus nature or man versus himself. Stories of war, athletic meets, and journalism contests are example of conflicts.
  • 65. This element emphasizes the newest angle of the story. The more recent the event, the more interesting it is to the reader.
  • 66. It may refer to geographical nearness as well as to nearness of kinship or interest. Example, to a Filipino reader, news about a cholera epidemic in Asia concerns him more than the same kind of epidemic in Europe.
  • 67. Some people are more prominent than others by reasons of wealth, social position, or achievements. Prominence may also refer to places. Example: The sudden death of Presidential candidate Fernando Poe Jr. hugged national and international headlines for many months.
  • 68. Whatever is significant to the life of an individual is interesting to him. Example: War, increase of oil, Inflation and etc.,
  • 69. Important names make important news. Also, the more names there are in the story, the better.
  • 70. This adds color to the story. The more pictures the background and the more dramatic the actions are, the more appealing the story is to the reader. Anything that moves a reader to tears, or to laughter is a good news.
  • 71. This refers to the strange or unnatural events, objects, persons, and places. An odd story is interesting bot because of news value but because of the human-interest side of it. Example: A dead man comes to life, finds himself in a coffin, sits up and dies again of heart attack.
  • 72. The romance of James Reid and Nadine Lustre had hugged headlines for many months. Romance may be experienced with other things. Example: Hardships, interesting story of the individual, and plot twist of the couple.
  • 73. Since the dawn of history, sex has always interested man. Stories of sex are usually related to stories of romance, marriage, divorce and the varied activities of men with women. But the element of sex is involved when a woman like Gloria Macapagal Arroyo is elected president of a country or Kevin Balot is the fist transgender who won a crown overseas.
  • 74. The onward and forward march of civilization or the progress of a country is chronically step by step in the newspaper. The trend today is towards development communication.
  • 75. Stories of animals, especially those with talents are good reading matter because of their human- interest value. Example: Heroism, Talent, or rarity,
  • 76. Sweeptakes numbers, vital statistics, election results, scores in games, casualties, fatalities, price of goods, and ages of women make good news.
  • 77. All the other elements of news mentioned above appeal to the emotion. But the term emotion here includes the various human responses such as the innate desire for food, clothing, shelter, the universal interest in children, animals, and nature and the natural feeling of love, sympathy, generosity, fear, hatred, and jealousy.
  • 78.
  • 79.  Choose a Recent, Newsworthy Event or Topic.  Conduct Timely, In-Person Interviews with Witnesses.  Establish the “Four Main Ws”  Construct Your Piece.  Research Additional Facts and Figures.
  • 80.  It needs to be punchy, include the most important facts and convey what the story is about.  Headline (Heading) The headline is the title of the news article. ...  Byline. This line tells who is writing the article. ...  Location. This is usually placed at the beginning of the article in bold print. ...  Lead Paragraph(s) ...  Supporting Paragraph(s)
  • 81.  To begin writing a news article, you need to research the topic you will be writing about extensively. In order to have a credible, well written, well-structured article, you have to know the topic well.  If you’ve ever written a research paper you understand the work that goes into learning about your topic. The first phase of writing a news article or editorial is pretty similar.  Begin by asking yourself the “5 W’s” (sometimes “6 W’s”)  Who - who was involved?  What - what happened?  Where - where did it happen?  Why - why did it happen?  When - when did it happen?  How - how did it happen?
  • 82.  Once you can clearly answer the “5 W’s”, jot down a list of all the pertinent facts and information that needs to be included in the article. Organize your facts into three groups:  1) those that need to be included in the article.  2) those that are interesting but not vital.  3) those that are related but not important to the purpose of the article.
  • 83. Your outline, and subsequently your article, should be structured like an inverted triangle. The inverted triangle allows you to build your story so that the most important information is at the top.
  • 84. In order to write a great news article, you need to know exactly who you are writing for. Your audience will dictate the voice and tone of your article and help you to know what you should include. Ask yourself the “5 W's” again, but this time in relation to your audience.
  • 85.  Why is this article unique to you? What is your voice? These questions will help you to make your news article unique and something that only you could write.  Even if you are covering a popular story or topic that others are writing about, look for an angle that will make this one yours.  Do you have a personal experience that relates to your topic? Maybe you know someone who is an expert that you can interview.
  • 86.  When writing a news article, interviewing people and getting a firsthand source on your topic can be invaluable. And while reaching out to people and asking for an interview may seem daunting, it can greatly affect the credibility and authority of your article.  People usually like to talk about personal experiences, especially if it will be featured somewhere, like your news article.  When you do interview people you need to follow a few rules
  • 87. INSTRUCTIONS: This activity will test your skills in presenting a news. You must present at least 5 news inside the campus. (be aware of do’s and don’ts) Provide a PPT (Power Point Presentation), by providing your headlines and some details and pictures of the news you’ve gathered. The presentation must only performed with a maximum of 15 minutes of duration. The reporter must be in a corporate attire. This presentation will be held at room 415 old building at exactly 9:30am.