Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

RIWC_PARA_A165 competencies needed for return to work (rtw) professionals for successful employment outcomes for people with disabilities

100 views

Published on

A165 competencies needed for return to work (rtw) professionals for successful employment outcomes for people with disabilities

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

RIWC_PARA_A165 competencies needed for return to work (rtw) professionals for successful employment outcomes for people with disabilities

  1. 1. Competencies Needed for Return to Work (RTW) Professionals for Successful Employment Outcomes for People with Disabilities Madan M. Kundu, Ph.D., CRC, NCC, LRC, FNRCA Chair, Work and Employment Commission, RI Chair, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA kundusubr@aol.com RI 23rd World Congress International Convention Center Edinburgh, Scotland, UK October 26, 2016
  2. 2. Learning Objectives • At the end of the presentation, participants will: • learn the challenges of implementing Article 27: Work and Employment of the UN CRPD • comprehend the important role of an RTW professionals in the lives of people with disabilities, • possess a general understanding of the roles and responsibilities of an RTW professionals, • identify with a list of core competencies of an RTW professionals, and • be knowledgeable of the structure of existing accredited training programs in BS, MS, and Ph.D. levels in the U.S. A. , and • be knowledgeable of other academic programs in Australia, Canada, South Korea and Taiwan. Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  3. 3. CRPD Article 27: Work and Employment • Prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability in all forms of employment, recruitment, hiring, retention, career advancement, and safe and healthy working conditions. • Access to general technical and vocational guidance programs, placement services and vocational and continuing training • Promote opportunities for self-employment & entrepreneurship • Promote employment opportunities in the public and private sectors through appropriate policies and measures – affirmative action, incentives, tax breaks, etc. • Promote vocational and professional rehabilitation, job retention and return-to-work (RTW) 2 Challenges: 1. To enhance employment outcomes for PWD by imparting, knowledge, skills, and competencies to be competitive in the labor market. 2. To enhance competencies of RTW professionals and provide quality services to PWD,
  4. 4. Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Focus • There has been a worldwide increased focus on VR services to assist in the management of social and economic costs of disability and injury. • Vocational Rehabilitation has shifted from medically focused to workplace and employer driven which emphasizes the role of the professionals’ in promoting successful RTW. Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  5. 5. Role of a RTW Coordinator •A key element of Return to work (RTW) interventions is the active involvement of a RTW coordinator. •Employed by insurers, employers, and governmental agencies, RTW coordinators facilitate the process of integrating workers with disabilities back into workforce. •Their professional backgrounds range from human resources, physical therapy, occupational therapy, nursing, vocational rehabilitation counseling, physician, psychiatrist, etc. Pransky et al. (2010)
  6. 6. An Overview: RTW Coordinator/Professional • A Return to Work Coordinator is the key person in the workplace who assists workers with disabilities or chronic or acute conditions to remain at or return to work as soon as safely possible post-onset. • The responsibilities of a RTW Coordinator are to: • Plan the worker's return to work if they require time away from work to recover and make decisions to progress their return. • Consult with the worker, their treating health practitioner, vocational rehabilitation provider, and other community base services coordinators. • Monitor the progress of a worker's recovery. • Take steps to prevent a recurrence or aggravation of the injury. • Act as a point of contact for a the employer. • Help resolve any issues or disputes related to return to work. Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  7. 7. Competencies Related to RTW • Competencies can be defined as the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors of the RTW coordinator • In the past, the role of an RTW coordinator has been poorly described, and minimal information on the specific skills knowledge, and attitudes needed for success was available. Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  8. 8. From Research to Reality: Highest-Rated Attributes • Active listening - especially the ability to elicit concerns about RTW from workers, employers, health care providers, and others; • Ability to communicate well in person and in writing with the full range of individuals involved in the RTW process; • Ability to relate well to a wide range of personalities; • Effective problem-solving skills around common issues that arise in returning to work; and • Respecting and maintaining confidentiality and effectively informing each involved party about the types of information that will be exchanged in the RTW process. • Source: Demou et al., 2014; Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, 2012 Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  9. 9. Challenges • Developing Academic and Professional Preparation Programs in colleges and universities: • Certificate • Diploma • Associate Degree • Bachelor’s Degree • Master’s Degree • Ph.D. Degree • State Licensure: LRC, LPC, … LRTWS • National Certification: CRC, CDMS, ….. • Evidence Based Research Infrastructure Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  10. 10. Need for Pre- and In-Service Training • There exists a positive relationship between perceived self-efficacy and quality of job performance. • One of the variables affecting personal competence in discharging job- related responsibilities is knowledge of topics relevant to performance. • Education is a significant deciding factor in the attainment of competency in core areas of allied health professions. • Effective training and professional development enhance employee’s personal motivation and self-efficacy, assist professionals to keep up with rapidly changing practice environment, and help them to become more aligned with the requirements for career growth. • Sources: Hasson, 2006; Roessler & Mullins, 1995; Truitt, 2011; Wheaton & Granello, 2002 Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  11. 11. Training Standards for RTW Professionals or Rehabilitation Counselors or Job Placement Specialists • There is a positive correlation between level of professional preparation of the VR practitioner and quality of VR outcome/degree of client satisfaction with services. • Development of academic degree granting programs at B.S. and M.S. levels. • Accreditation: The goal of accreditation is to ensure that education provided by programs and institutions of higher education meets acceptable levels of quality. • Accrediting agencies, develop evaluation criteria and conduct evaluations to assess whether or not those criteria are met. • Institutions and/or programs that request an agency's evaluation and that meet an agency's criteria are then "accredited" by that agency. Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  12. 12. Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE), USA Curriculum Standards for B.S. in Rehabilitation Services Last 2years of 4 years of college major • C1. Lived Experience of Difference • C2. Service Delivery Systems, including Allied Occupations and Professionals • C3. Community Inclusion and Integration • C4. Interpersonal and Professional Communication • C5. Advocacy and Self-Determination • C6. Ethics and Professional Practice • C7. Field Experiences • C8. Concentration or Specialty Areas: (Substance Abuse, Assistive Technology, Vocational Evaluation, Independent Living, Supported Employment, Transition, or Job Coaching) Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  13. 13. Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE), USA Standards for M.S. in Rehabilitation Counseling C1. Professional Identity and Ethical Behavior C2. Psychosocial Aspects of Disability and Cultural Diversity C3. Human Growth and Development C4. Counseling Theories and Techniques C5. Group Work and Family Dynamics C6. Rehabilitation Assessment and Evaluation C7. Research and Program Evaluation C8. Medical, Functional, and Environmental Aspects of Disability C9. Rehabilitation Services, Case Management, and Related Services C10. Employment and Career Development Theories D1- D3. Clinical Experience Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  14. 14. National Institute of Disability Management and Research (NIDMR), Canada Certification Competencies in 9 domains 1.Demonstrate Knowledge of Disability Management Theory and Practice 2.Apply Legislation and Benefits Programs 3.Labour/Management Relations 4.Utilize Communication and Problem Solving Skills 5.Disability Case Management 6.Return-to-Work Coordination 7.Health, Psycho-social, Prevention, and Functional Aspects of Disability 8.Development of Program Management and Evaluation Activities 9.Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Conduct Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  15. 15. • Vocational Counseling • Instruct client in job search skills • Determine level of intervention necessary • Workplace Disability Case Management • Utilize ergonomic strategies to reduce work injury risks • Understand industrial relations issues and possible impact on RTW planning for clients • Workplace Intervention and Program Management • Develop worksite procedures for injury/disability management programs and RTW activities • Facilitate joint worker-management collaboration to develop and implement injury/disability management programs Australian and German Study (Mathew, et al. 2015) The Vocational Rehabilitation Competency Survey (VRCS) - 113 knowledge and kills statements 3 common domains were identified by Principal Axis Factor Extraction & Varimax Rotation Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  16. 16. • Pransky et al. (2010) defined over 100 competencies relative to RTW coordination (Australia, Canada, & USA). Through affinity mapping, each defined competency was assigned to one of the following categories: Administration Individual personal attributes Information gathering Communication Professional credibility Evaluation Problem-solving Conflict management
  17. 17. A Systems Approach to Placement – Self-Assessment for Students and Counselors (SAP-SASC) Measured 80 knowledge, skill and competency areas Cronbach’s alpha internal consistency reliability coefficients Kundu et at. (2005), Dutta, Kundu et al (2015), Yaeda, Kundu, & Nishimura (2013) Subsystems USA: N=117 Taiwan: N=116 Japan: N= 479 Client .91 .88 Health .94 .96 Varying between Education .89 .88 Family .92 .91 .85 - .98 Social .95 .93 Employer .87 .96 Placement Personnel .93 .92 Funding .93 .74 Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  18. 18. Internal Consistency Reliability - SAP: SASC Kundu, Dutta, & Chan (2011) • The questionnaire was administered to 275 caseload carrying rehabilitation counselors in state-federal vocational rehabilitation agencies in Alaska, Hawaii, Louisiana, New York, Guam, Saipan and Puerto Rico, and in American Indian TVR programs in Alaska, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. • Factor analysis identified six domains that sufficiently explained Rehabilitation Counselors competency areas and eliminated 10 items. • Cronbach’s alpha was calculated on these six domains (sub-systems) as a measure of internal consistency: Factor 1: Employer Subsystem = .96 Factor 2: Job Placement Subsystem = .95 Factor 3: Health and Education Subsystem = .95 Factor 4: Social and Contextual Subsystem = .93 Factor 5: Funding Subsystem = .93 Factor 6: Client Subsystem = .90 Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  19. 19. Implications for Research and Practice • Roles and functions of RTW professionals employed at Public vs. Private Sectors. • Impact of education and training (BS and MS) in Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, Disability Management, etc. from accredited institutions of higher education for RTW professionals in the quality service delivery. • Efficacy of licensure, certification, and continued education for RTW professionals in maintaining competencies. • Trans-national knowledge, skill, and competency studies for RTW professionals to develop a universal minimum standard and standard for specializations to meet local needs. Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR
  20. 20. Research Practice Theory Better Rehabilitation Outcomes Better Employability Dr. Madan M. Kundu, Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, SUBR

×