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1
KIRSTEN VOLLMER
Bundesinstitut für Berufsbildung (Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training)
Vocational Ed...
2
Since Germany signed the UN-Convention as one of the first countries these
sentences are intensely discussed. Often rath...
3
• persons with disabilities are able to access general tertiary education, vo-
cational training, adult education and li...
4
training arrangements exclusively available to persons with severe disabilities
which hinder, which stop, them from “reg...
5
offers practical information for all who deal with compensating disability
caused disadvantages in vocational training. ...
6
• the opportunity to change to getting trained in the related recognized oc-
cupation
(to “upgrade”);
• a personal suppo...
7
Forthcoming tasks in the field of training arrangements as instruments for en-
abling the participation of disabled pers...
8
quantitative terms. Almost 300.000 persons are either getting trained there or
already included in working processes.
Ri...
9
The UN Convention can serve as an excellent compass for investigating both
framework conditions and the institutional la...
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RIWC_PARA_A004 Vocational Education and Training in Germany and the Convention of the United Nations on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

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A004 Vocational Education and Training in Germany and the Convention of the United Nations on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

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RIWC_PARA_A004 Vocational Education and Training in Germany and the Convention of the United Nations on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

  1. 1. 1 KIRSTEN VOLLMER Bundesinstitut für Berufsbildung (Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training) Vocational Education and Training in Germany and the Convention of the United Nations on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Ladies and gentlemen, it`s an honor and a pleasure to talk to you, this audience, here in the historic and beautiful town of Edinburgh. What a genius loci to get into an exchange about a key sector of participation and inclusion: vocational education and training. Let me quote: “States Parties recognize the right of persons with disabilities to education. With a view to realizing this right without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunity, States Parties shall ensure an inclusive education system at all levels and lifelong learning directed to: The development by persons with disabilities of their personality, talents and creativity, as well as their mental and physical abilities, to their fullest poten- tial”. So far the Convention of the United Nations on the rights of persons with dis- abilities. Do these sentences describe reality? Do they design a vision? Paint a dream? Are these sentences expressing a promise? Establish rights?
  2. 2. 2 Since Germany signed the UN-Convention as one of the first countries these sentences are intensely discussed. Often rather controversial. Mostly very emotional. Sometimes ideological. Interesting - and maybe somehow “specific German” – is the phenomen, that while the word “participation” is much more often used in the Convention, it is the term “inclusion” that made an astonishing career as the key word when referred to the interpretation and implementation of the UN-Convention. "Inclusion" is the crucial term which has become increasingly familiar in pro- fessional circles as well as in media since the enactment of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its adoption in the Federal Republic of Germany in March 2009. But what does it actually mean? To what extent does an inclusive approach substantively move beyond the "philosophy" of participation? In other words, is it not the case that German Social Security Code IX represents the real quantum leap in this direction? After all, the much quoted paradigm shift "away from patronizing care towards self-directed participation" is attributed to this social law enacted in 2001. While these issues continue to provoke a controversial response from experts, the implementation process of the UN Convention in Germany has begun several years ago and the focus has shifted to specific, not only structural, questions. The already quoted Article 24 of the UN Convention deals with the right of education and demands that countries shall ensure that: • persons with disabilities receive the support required, within the general education system, to facilitate their effective education; • effective individualised support measures are provided in environments that maximize academic and social development, consistent with the goal of full inclusion;
  3. 3. 3 • persons with disabilities are able to access general tertiary education, vo- cational training, adult education and lifelong learning without discrimina- tion and on an equal basis with others. My specific professional focus is vocational education and training. Vocational education and training can mean very different things to different people. In some countries, it refers to education and training provided by and in schools, with no or limited exposure to real work situations. What is meant when talking about vocational education and training in Germany? The dual system is at the core of vocational education and training in Germa- ny. It is referred to as “dual” because training takes place in two different learning venues: in a company and at a part-time vocational school. The dual system is based on the Vocational Training Act of 1969 and on the Crafts and Trades Regulation Code and still the main pathway for the young generation to employment – besides, increasingly in recent years, academic education. Companies sign contracts with the applicants under private law and train them in line with the binding provisions of the vocational training directives which guarantee national standard. This is monitored by the “competent bod- ies”, mainly the chambers (of industry and commerce, crafts, agriculture, doc- tors, lawyers). The dual system provides broad vocational training and competences for 329 recognized training occupations. The programs in the dual system usually take 3 years. What about vocational training of people with disabilities and the quoted obligations of the UN convention? In Germany, legal guidelines which considerate these demands have been in place for many years in the form of instruments which compensate for disad- vantage caused by disability. These include arrangements of compensation for disadvantages within “regular” training and testing. Furthermore they include
  4. 4. 4 training arrangements exclusively available to persons with severe disabilities which hinder, which stop, them from “regular” qualifications. At least regionally, however, still a degree of uncertainty exists about the pos- sible forms of arrangements, about how to practice these arrangements con- cretely, and, after all, about how to practice them without offering unjustified advantages with respect to people without disabilities. As a result, there is still partly a lack of self-evident use of these instruments. However, highly provoked by the UN Convention and the National Agenda of implementing it, a big “push” forward has taken place: the institutions re- sponsible for vocational education and training, especially the so-called com- petent bodies, are realizing the need to take up more engagement concerning their task to include people with disabilities in vocational training and in work. In addition, parallel discussions about demographic change and shortage of skilled persons contribute to consider people with disabilities as “human re- source” and “human potential”. What does it mean: “compensation for disadvantages caused by disability”? This states that the special circumstances of disabled persons shall be taken into account and – I quote law now – “This shall apply in particular to the timetable and syllabus of initial training, the duration of examination periods, permission to use aids and utilization of the assistance of third parties such as sign language interpreters for the hearing-impaired“. “In particular” means: allowing longer examination periods is an example. More and other compensation arrangements are possible and should be prac- ticed - according to the individual case. In requiring these "particular circumstances" to be taken into account, legisla- tion transfers to the competent bodies a task which is just as challenging as it is crucial to the disabled persons affected and to their opportunity to undergo training in a recognized training occupation. We, the Federal Institute of Vocational Training and Education, have worked out with a circle of experts for different kinds of disabilities a handbook, which
  5. 5. 5 offers practical information for all who deal with compensating disability caused disadvantages in vocational training. This guide offers orientation and support for the chambers, for trainers in companies and in vocational training centers and for teachers in part-time vocational schools. With the publication we intend to improve the application of compensation for disadvantage - and thereby aim at including more young people with disa- bilities in general vocational training and afterwards in employment in the general market. What about the training arrangements for persons with severe disabilities not able to be trained in recognized occupations at all? The two basic laws dealing with vocational training make provision for the competent bodies to act on an application made by disabled persons or their legal representatives to issue training regulations. These special training regu- lations shall be in accordance with the recommendations of the Board of the Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training. Professional assess- ments regarding the nature and severity of disability are made by the Regional Employment Agency which in turn is required to include the specialist services offered by the Federal Employment Agency. Those special qualifications in respect to severe disabilities shall be developed from the contents of recognized training occupations according to the status and development of the general labour market. Because training arrangements for disabled persons are issued by the regional competent bodies, many different training arrangements have been issued over the course of the years. Starting from the finding that the number of training arrangements had grown to just under 1,000 by 2006 framework guidelines were adopted in the same year. This training arrangement framework constitutes a further step in the process to provide a guarantee that disabled persons will be trained in accordance with national quality standards. The core elements of the training arrangement framework are as follows:
  6. 6. 6 • the opportunity to change to getting trained in the related recognized oc- cupation (to “upgrade”); • a personal support plan; • co-responsibility of the vocational school; • adopting people with learning disabilities as the main target group; • suitability of the training venue, trainer ratio; • specific additional qualifications for trainers in the field of rehabilitation; • periods of company-based training; • a unified, non-discriminatory qualification title; • Vocational competence as the aim of initial training – crucial, as this is the aim of “regular” initial training on the basis of German law, the Vocational Training Act and the Crafts and Trades Regulation Code. As well as forming the binding basis for the enactment of all training arrange- ments by the regional competent bodies the training arrangement framework also constitutes the basis for the activities of working groups, which draw up occupationally specific sample regulations. The working groups operate under the lead management of the Federal Insti- tute of Vocational Education and Training and include experts from the social partners, the Federal Government, the Conference of the Ministers of Educa- tion and Cultural Affairs from institutions for the vocational training of disa- bled persons. The first working groups produced pioneering work for all which are to follow. The fact is that whereas classical regulatory work for the introduction and up- dating of recognized training occupations enjoys the support of a standard- ized procedure which has been tried and tested for decades, these working groups have broken new ground.
  7. 7. 7 Forthcoming tasks in the field of training arrangements as instruments for en- abling the participation of disabled persons within the meaning of the prohibi- tion of discrimination stated in German Basic Law and the UN Convention will include both the nationwide and cross-branch implementation of the training regulation framework and the sample regulations and, in the medium-term, evaluation of these. In addition to this, a particular focus needs to be placed on expanding the ra- ther limited spectrum of occupational areas which offer disabled persons vo- cational training on the basis of training arrangements. Here developing alter- natives to the usual housekeeping sector for young women is one of the tasks. Sample arrangements can create a signal effect and encourage companies and vocational education and training institutions to develop training provision in labour market oriented occupational areas which are suitable for this group of persons. Vocational training according to training arrangements leads to certificates as “Fachpraktiker” – one could translate it as “Practical skilled worker”. Often ini- tial vocational training in Fachpraktiker-Berufen takes place in vocational training centers for disabled persons – not in companies. The UN convention put into focus the important task to improve the participa- tion and inclusion of people with disabilities in general vocational training and in general labour market. The discussion about how to achieve this, about how to reduce extra- company training, about how to motivate more companies to train and em- ploy people with disabilities – and about how to find adequate approaches for the different kinds of disabilities and especially the growing number of people with psychic disabilities is ongoing. Let`s have a look to vocational training of disabled persons beyond the legal conditions and "umbrellas" of the two basic vocational laws. An important field to be focused are the workshops for disabled persons and their vocational education and training. The workshops are highly relevant in
  8. 8. 8 quantitative terms. Almost 300.000 persons are either getting trained there or already included in working processes. Right now we are enacting a new advanced vocational qualification for those persons who train the disabled employees and organize and accompany their training and working process. While working out a modernized qualification profile we put special empha- size on increasing the number of transitions from workshops to general labour market – according to the demands of the UN Convention. The relatively recently introduced "supported employment" is another in- strument to be looked at. It aims at integrating persons not able to undergo regular vocational training in employment by “training on the job” accompa- nied by job coaches. In general, connectivity and permeability are of particular significance. For this reason, bridges need to be built and preconditions for their specific imple- mentation put in place. One example of how this could be done would be to align vocational training in workshops for the disabled persons to dual training on the basis of the Vocational Training Act and the Crafts and Trades Regula- tion Code and to make specific credit transfer available. If occupational biographies (and thus life chances) no longer culminate in dead ends as a result of various legal circles and areas of responsibility and if the spirit and letter of the UN Convention can be upheld and accessibility achieved, disabled persons will actually enjoy equal participation, both in (vo- cational) training and via (vocational) training. The views expressed by former Federal Minister of Education ANETTE SCHAVAN need to be taken seriously, and the focus should be on implementing them. I quote: "If it benefits our children that the Federal Government, the federal states, local authorities (and further partners) work together on educational issues, then this is what we must do. We need new forms of cooperation in the field of education which are aligned towards actual responsibility rather than merely towards areas of responsibility."
  9. 9. 9 The UN Convention can serve as an excellent compass for investigating both framework conditions and the institutional landscape as it has developed over decades with regard to the guideline of participation and inclusion. It is within the interest of those affected and completely within the spirit of the UN Con- vention with regard to its emphasis on the dignity of every single individual person not to set out any concept in absolute terms and not to defend struc- tures and acquired rights simply for their own sake. Instead of this, the focus needs to be on identifying and shaping pathways for operationalization which do justice to the vision of the UN Convention. Ladies and gentlemen, thank you very much for your attention.

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