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Setting up an ER Program?
Here’s what you don’t do
9th ER Seminar
October 1, 2016
Nanzan University
Marcel Van Amelsvoort
...
At a small liberal arts department in a private university in Tokyo…
April, 2015: Department opens, ER program is launched...
Number of
books
Number of
students
Percentage of
students
0 books 36 29.3%
1-3 books 49 39.8%
4-6 books 22 17.9%
7-9 books...
2016: After 15 weeks…
Number of
books
Number of
students
Percentage of
students
0 books 0 0%
1-3 books 5 4.2%
4-6 books 14...
Number of books Percentage of students
0 books 29.3% → 0%
1-3 books 39.8% → 4.2%
4-6 books 17.9% → 11.7%
7-9 books 7.3% → ...
Biases and Mindsets
Both!
Vitamin or painkiller?
Eyal, 2014
Don’t assume they (will) like
reading (in English)
Few students long texts read regularly
Processing stress of L2 readin...
Don’t assume they (will) know
how to do ER
Previous experience = 0 (Mikami, 2016)
“Reading should be difficult” mindset
Don’t assume they (will) do
it, even if they want to
Time / priority management
Lack of consistent graded reader quality
Don’t assume they (will) benefit
from it (tangibly)
 Reading speed improvements after 200,000 words
(Beglar and Hunt, 201...
appear non-
institutionalized
 Get (or pretend you have) institutional
authority behind your program (Pigott, 2011)
make it optional
 Give grades
 Track it—as publically as possible (Burke et al. 2011)
separate it from the
syllabus / curriculum
 Position it as an important part of the
program
 Use readings for in-class a...
have fuzzy goals
 Have clear targets for word counts, book
counts, or page counts
 Use points to encourage sufficient re...
let ER “run itself”
 Use the power of the involved coach (Yashima, 2014)
 Use your knowledge of books to create
activiti...
make it hard to
access
 Place your books close by
 Use XReading if possible
trust (all) your
students
 Require quizzes or short book reports (on
Xreading, etc.)
Sufficient
engagement
 Requires regular (habitual) behaviors
 Is extremely difficult to achieve given the
cultures of mo...
University Student Time and Study Allotment in Japan 2007
Weekly out-of-class study hours:
Japanese and American students
...
• Beglar, D., & Hunt, A. (2014). Pleasure reading and reading rate gains. Reading in a Foreign Language, 26, 29-49.
• Burk...
Thank you very much
amelsvoort@juntendo.ac.jp
@Marcelva
Illustration: Bill Butcher,
https://www.1843magazine.com/f
eatures/the-scientists-who-make-
apps-addictive
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Setting up an ER program? Here's what you don't do

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Suggestions for setting up an EFL extensive reading program

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Setting up an ER program? Here's what you don't do

  1. 1. Setting up an ER Program? Here’s what you don’t do 9th ER Seminar October 1, 2016 Nanzan University Marcel Van Amelsvoort Juntendo University Faculty of International Liberal Arts
  2. 2. At a small liberal arts department in a private university in Tokyo… April, 2015: Department opens, ER program is launched April, 2016: Department welcomes its 2nd cohort, ER program 2.0 is launched (See Van Amelsvoort, 2016 for a full description)
  3. 3. Number of books Number of students Percentage of students 0 books 36 29.3% 1-3 books 49 39.8% 4-6 books 22 17.9% 7-9 books 9 7.3% 10-12 books 1 0.8% More than 12 books 7 5.7% (n=123) 2015: After 14 weeks…
  4. 4. 2016: After 15 weeks… Number of books Number of students Percentage of students 0 books 0 0% 1-3 books 5 4.2% 4-6 books 14 11.7% 7-9 books 21 17.6% 10-12 books 35 29.4% More than 12 books 46 38.6% (n=119) 100,000 target word count clear: 90/119 students
  5. 5. Number of books Percentage of students 0 books 29.3% → 0% 1-3 books 39.8% → 4.2% 4-6 books 17.9% → 11.7% 7-9 books 7.3% → 17.6% 10-12 books 0.8% → 29.4% More than 12 books 5.7% → 38.6% Changes between 2015 and 2016
  6. 6. Biases and Mindsets
  7. 7. Both! Vitamin or painkiller? Eyal, 2014
  8. 8. Don’t assume they (will) like reading (in English) Few students long texts read regularly Processing stress of L2 reading Lack of consistent graded reader quality
  9. 9. Don’t assume they (will) know how to do ER Previous experience = 0 (Mikami, 2016) “Reading should be difficult” mindset
  10. 10. Don’t assume they (will) do it, even if they want to Time / priority management Lack of consistent graded reader quality
  11. 11. Don’t assume they (will) benefit from it (tangibly)  Reading speed improvements after 200,000 words (Beglar and Hunt, 2014)  TOEIC improvements after 300,000 words (Nishizawa, Yoshioka, & Fukada, 2010; Nishizawa & Yoshioka (2016). )
  12. 12. appear non- institutionalized  Get (or pretend you have) institutional authority behind your program (Pigott, 2011)
  13. 13. make it optional  Give grades  Track it—as publically as possible (Burke et al. 2011)
  14. 14. separate it from the syllabus / curriculum  Position it as an important part of the program  Use readings for in-class activities—Additive ER Plus
  15. 15. have fuzzy goals  Have clear targets for word counts, book counts, or page counts  Use points to encourage sufficient reading  Provide rubrics for scoring
  16. 16. let ER “run itself”  Use the power of the involved coach (Yashima, 2014)  Use your knowledge of books to create activities, recommend titles, etc.
  17. 17. make it hard to access  Place your books close by  Use XReading if possible
  18. 18. trust (all) your students  Require quizzes or short book reports (on Xreading, etc.)
  19. 19. Sufficient engagement  Requires regular (habitual) behaviors  Is extremely difficult to achieve given the cultures of most universities and the culture of technology now prevalant.
  20. 20. University Student Time and Study Allotment in Japan 2007 Weekly out-of-class study hours: Japanese and American students Japanese student daily time allotment 4.6 hours per day for classes and studying Part-time job Club Reading, etc. Thesis Classes Class-related studying Total studying time 4.6 hours/day 4.5 hours per day
  21. 21. • Beglar, D., & Hunt, A. (2014). Pleasure reading and reading rate gains. Reading in a Foreign Language, 26, 29-49. • Burke, L., Wang, J., and Sevick, M. (2011) Self-monitoring in weight loss: A systematic review of the literature. Journal of the academcy of nutrition and dietetics. 11(1), (pp 92–102). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jada.2010.10.008 • Eyal, N. (2014). Hooked: How to build habit-forming products. New York: Portfolio Penguin. • Carney, N. (2016). Gauging extensive reading's relationship with TOEIC reading score growth. Journal of Extensive Reading 4(4). Retrieved Sept. 1, 2016 from http://jalt-publications.org/jer/ • Little, D. (1991). Learner autonomy 1: Definitions, Issues, and Problems. Dublin: Authentik. • McGonigal, K. (2012). The willpower instinct: How self-control works, why it matters, and what you can do to get more of it. New York: Avery Penguin. • Mikami, A. (2016), Students' Attitudes Toward Extensive Reading in the Japanese EFL Context. TESOL J. doi:10.1002/tesj.283 • Nishizawa, H., Yoshioka, T., & Fukada, M. (2010). The impact of a 4-year extensive reading program. In A. M. Stoke (Ed.), JALT2009 conference proceedings (pp. 632-40). Tokyo: JALT. • Nishizawa, H. & Yoshioka, T. (2016). Longitudinal case study of a 7-year long ER program. In M. Gobert (Ed.), Proceedings of the 3rd world congress on extensive reading (pp. 28–40). Leanpub. Retrieved Sept. 1, 2016 from https://leanpub.com/proceedingserwc3 • Pigott, J. D. (2011). Self and motivation in compulsory English classes in Japan. In A. Stewart (Ed.), JALT2010 conference proceedings (pp. 540-50). Tokyo: JALT. • Thaler, R., and Sunstein, C. (2009). Nudge: Improving decisions about health, wealth, and happiness. New York: Penguin • Van Amelsvoort, M. (2016). Extensive reading onboarding: Challenges and responses in an optional program. Juntendo Journal of Global Studies, 1, (pp. 95-106). • Yashima, T. (2014). Self-regulation and autonomous dependency. In Garold Murray (ed.). Social dimensions of autonomy in language learning (pp. 60-77). References
  22. 22. Thank you very much amelsvoort@juntendo.ac.jp @Marcelva
  23. 23. Illustration: Bill Butcher, https://www.1843magazine.com/f eatures/the-scientists-who-make- apps-addictive

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