Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

EPA PowerPoint Presentation on Methane Migration in Dimock, PA Water Wells

1,231 views

Published on

A PowerPoint presentation supposedly obtained by the LA Times that concludes nearby Marcellus Shale drilling and fracking likely caused methane migration in some area residents' water wells. The presentation contains data that supposedly originates with the EPA, although the EPA is not referenced anywhere in the document, nor is the document attributed to the EPA (nor footnoted). Therefore, the source of the document is suspect unless/until the EPA confirms that this document originated from their offices.

Published in: News & Politics, Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

EPA PowerPoint Presentation on Methane Migration in Dimock, PA Water Wells

  1. 1. Determining the origin of methane  and its effect on the aquifer.
  2. 2. Agenda  Geologic history  Methane characteristics  The ratio of carbon isotopes in methane.  The unique ratio of hydrocarbons in the Marcellus  F iFormation  Identifying the age of the methane.  Th   ff t   th   d d illi  h    th   if   The effects methane and drilling have on the aquifer  and trend over time.  Conclusions Conclusions.
  3. 3. EnvironmentEnvironment  of Deposition Middle Devonian  (385 MA)
  4. 4. Osborn S G et al. PNAS 2011;108:8172‐8176
  5. 5. h h l h d b d dMethane is the principal hydrocarbon detected in  all stray natural gas migration incidents  Exposure limit (gas phase): TLV‐TWA: 1,000 ppm (ACGIH, 10/2009)  Methane (CH4) is the simplest paraffin hydrocarbon gas  Methane is generated by microbial & thermogenic processes  Flammable, colorless, odorless.  Specific gra it   0  (NTP) air    Specific gravity:  0.555 (NTP) air = 1  Explosive range: 5‐15% in ambient air  Solubility in water: 26‐32 mg/l (1 atm.)y 3 g/ ( )  Non toxic, no ingestion hazard  Simple asphyxiant, explosion hazard Methane can migrate as free gas or dissolved in the groundwater
  6. 6. Isotopic Balance  Researchers have determined that there are common carbon  & hydrogen isotopic compositions or signatures for  thermogenic gas associated with coal & natural gas, drift gas,  So by collecting numerous gas samples of known origin a database has been d l d d fi i ti f g g g g and other near surface microbial gases .   Natural carbon is nearly all isotope 12, with 1.11 percent being  isotope 13   developed and fingerprinting of gas samples may performed. isotope 13.   Organic material contains less C‐13, because bacteria  /photosynthesis preferentially selects C‐12 over C‐13. p y p y 3  Oil and natural gas typically show a C‐12 to C‐13 ratio similar  to that of the biological materials from which they are to have  originated  originated. 
  7. 7. Sh l GShale Gas  Increasing formation  Increasing formation  temperature leads to diagnostic  methane/ethane and isotopic  ratios The normal sequence of carbon isotopic compositions is:ratios  Tight gas shales such as the  Marcellus often have uniquely  diagnostic isotopic reversals  δ13C methane (C1) < δ13C ethane (C2) < δ13C propane (C3) and < δ13C butane (C4) δ13C1 < δ13C2 < δ13C3 and < δ13C4 diagnostic isotopic reversals  (e.g. δ13C‐CH4 heavier than  δ13C‐C2H6) In the Marcellus they are fully reversed ‐ δ13C1  >  δ13C2  >  δ13C3 Also hydrogen isotopic compositions (δ2H) of C1 and C2 are also reversed.  Uniquely identifiable when  paired with additional proxies  (e.g. noble gases)
  8. 8. I t G h i tIsotope Geochemistry Easily Distinguishes:  Molecular: Methane/Ethane  Isotopic: Carbon and  Biogenic vs. Thermogenic (e.g. Schoell, 1983; Coleman et al, 1991;  Baldassare and Laughrey, 1998) Hydrogen isotopes (δ13C‐CH4,  δ2H‐CH4, δ13C‐C2H6)  N bl  G Distinguishing different  thermogenic gases  (e.g. Schoell et al, 1983; Jenden et al, 1993;   Noble Gases Revesz et al, 2010; Tilley et al, 2010) ? What’s best for distinguishing  thermally mature gases?y g
  9. 9. 13 C fractionation 2 H fractionation % argon 2 H fractionation % argon ‐29 ‐160 % nitrogen
  10. 10. HW04 HW02zHW05 HW12 HW17 HW24 HW02 HW14 HW06 HW08a HW12 HW01
  11. 11. Sample Quality ‐ degassing?Sample Quality   degassing?  ideal
  12. 12. Three Patterns of Contamination 1. Short term (< 1 year) disruption to the aquifer  caused by drilling.    (     ) di i     i i  2. Long term (> 3‐4 year) disruption or contamination  of the aquifer caused by drilling/fracking, releases or  other situationsother situations. 3. Natural Background Conditions with high levels  of metals and anions.
  13. 13. Type 1: Short Term Disruption
  14. 14. HW04Gas  Well Activity HW04 1000 1200 25000 30000 35000 Baker Wells  ‐ 1,300 ft to SSE Spud ‐ Baker 1   11 Aug. 2008 ‐ Baker 2  11 Dec. 2009   Methane isotope sample probably  plots outside Marcellus Shale age  zone. (interestingly the gas  appears older, maybe deeper than  Marcellus Shale) 400 600 800 5000 10000 15000 20000 0 200 4 ‐10000 ‐5000 0 5 10‐Aug‐08 26‐Feb‐09 14‐Sep‐09 2‐Apr‐10 19‐Oct‐10 7‐May‐11 23‐Nov‐11g 9 4 p 9 p 9 y 3 Methane_ug_l Eh in Mv Linear (Methane_ug_l) Linear (Eh in Mv) Normal range of Eh in groundwater is 200 to ‐100 Mv. Freshwater streams 300 to 500 Mv. 9 pH 6 7 8 9 p 4 5 12‐May‐08 28‐Nov‐08 16‐Jun‐09 2‐Jan‐10 21‐Jul‐10 6‐Feb‐11 25‐Aug‐11 Analysis_Ph_ph_Units
  15. 15. 80018000 HW‐7 600 700 12000 14000 16000 l Gas  Well Activity Baker Wells  ‐ 1,300 ft to SSE Spud ‐ Baker 1   11 Aug. 2008 ‐ Baker 2  11 Dec. 2009   400 500 8000 10000 12000 Methane  in ug/l 100 200 300 2000 4000 6000 00 2000 9‐Sep‐08 28‐Mar‐09 14‐Oct‐09 2‐May‐10 18‐Nov‐10 6‐Jun‐11 23‐Dec‐11 M h l Eh M M   /l Li  (M h l) Li  (Eh M ) Li  (M   /l)Methane_ug_l Eh Mv Manganese ug/l Linear (Methane_ug_l) Linear (Eh Mv) Linear (Manganese ug/l) 8 8.5 pH 7 7.5 12/18/2008 3/28/2009 7/6/2009 10/14/2009 1/22/2010 5/2/2010 8/10/2010 11/18/2010 2/26/2011 6/6/2011 9/14/2011 12/23/2011
  16. 16. 45014000 HW17 350 400 45 12000 4 250 300 8000 10000 g/l & Mnin ug/l Methane isotope  sampling indicate  Marcellus Shale age  100 150 200 4000 6000 Methane in mg Eh in Mv Marcellus Shale age  gas at this data point  . 0 50 100 0 2000 M Eh Mv Mn ug/l Methane ug/l Eh Trend Methane Trend G   ll   S d  i     Note incomplete data set  Gas Well  Date Spud  Distance to HW17 Lewis  5/28/2008            670 ft. Ely 4H & 6H      3/27/2008            1,360 ft. Costello 1 7/16/2008             1,350 ft.
  17. 17. 50045 HW1 ‐ Hubert 300 400 30 35 40 Methane isotope  sampling indicate  Marcellus Shale age  gas at this data point g/l 200 300 20 25 30 Eh in Mv Gesford 3 spud  July 28, 2008 Methane in mg 0 100 5 10 15 M ‐1000 16‐Dec‐08 16‐Apr‐09 16‐Aug‐09 16‐Dec‐09 16‐Apr‐10 16‐Aug‐10 16‐Dec‐10 16‐Apr‐11 16‐Aug‐11 16‐Dec‐11 Methane mg/l Eh in Mv Methane Trend Eh Trend HW1 lacked data for nearly all constituents,  particularly for the years  2009‐2010 
  18. 18. Type 2: Long Term Disruption
  19. 19. 45030 Gesford 2  HW8 Methane isotope sample Methane and Manganese 300 350 400 20 25 Remediation of well  on April  1, 2009  Methane isotope sample plots outside Marcellus Shale age zone. Gesford 2  Spud   Sept. 23, 2008 Stimu Nov‐ Dec 2008 100 150 200 250 10 15 0 50 0 5 29‐Oct‐08 17‐May‐09 3‐Dec‐09 21‐Jun‐10 7‐Jan‐11 26‐Jul‐11 11‐Feb‐12 Methane in mg/l Mn in ug/l Linear (Methane in mg/l) Linear (Mn in ug/l)Methane in mg/l Mn in ug/l Linear (Methane in mg/l) Linear (Mn in ug/l) 7 8 9 605 705 pH ‐ Eh 2 3 4 5 6 7 205 305 405 505 0 1 5 105 29‐Oct‐08 17‐May‐09 3‐Dec‐09 21‐Jun‐10 7‐Jan‐11 26‐Jul‐11 11‐Feb‐12 Eh in Mv Analysis_Ph_ph_Units Linear (Eh in Mv) Linear (Analysis_Ph_ph_Units)
  20. 20. Gas is Gas 0 500 Interbedded sandstone, siltstone Gas is Gas  Thermogenic gas is present  throughout the upper Devonian  1,000 Catskill  &  shale g pp formations.  Drilling creates  pathways, either temporary or  permanent, that allows gas to  migrate to the shallow aquifer  1,500 2,000 Sandstone surface migrate to the shallow aquifer  near surface.  Shallower  (non Marcellus) gas  may also include higher amounts  2,500 Gas shows h beneath s may also include higher amounts  of H2S which can have a greater  impact on groundwater.  In some cases  these gases  3,000 3,500 interbedded siltstone and  shale Depth  In some cases, these gases  disrupts groundwater quality  4,000 From Gesford 2 Well Record and Completion Report 4,500 5,000 Tully Limestone Gas show
  21. 21. 600 700 18.00 20.00 Maye ‐HW 14  Mn x 10,000 Eh in mV Mn_mg_l Methane ‐ mg/l ‐Postdrill‐ Mn 62 ug/l  TSS 35.5 mg/l  TDS 127 mg/l Methane isotope  sampling indicate  Marcellus Shale age  600 700 18,000.00 20,000.00 ‐HW 14  ‐Postdrill‐ Mn 62 ug/l  TSS 35.5 mg/l  TDS 127 mg/l Fe 3 38 mg/l Methane isotope  sampling indicate  500 600 14.00 16.00 g Fe 3.38 mg/l Cl‐ 12.7 mg/l Major rain event 10" 7 9 Sept 2011 gas at this data point  . 500 600 14,000.00 16,000.00 Mn x 10,000 Fe 3.38 mg/l Cl‐ 12.7 mg/l Marcellus Shale age  gas at this data point  . G   W ll A i i 400 12.00 Predrill 10   7‐9 Sept 2011 400 12,000.00 Eh trend h   d Gas  Well Activity Baker Wells  1,100 ft. east Spud ‐ Baker 1   11 Aug. 2008 ‐ Baker 2  11 Dec. 2009   300 8.00 10.00 ‐Predrill‐ Mn ‐ na TSS <5 mg/l TDS 149mg/l Fe 0.03mg/l Cl‐ 7.9mg/l 300 8,000.00 10,000.00 methane trend 200 4.00 6.00 200 4,000.00 6,000.00 ‐Predrill‐ Mn ‐ na TSS <5 mg/l 0 100 0.00 2.00 100 2,000.00 TSS <5 mg/l TDS 149mg/l Fe 0.03mg/l Cl‐ 7.9mg/l 00.00
  22. 22. 12040 HW‐2 80 100 120 30 35 40 l Mn Methane isotope  sampling indicate  Marcellus Shale age  40 60 15 20 25 Methane mg/ Mn ug/l Stimulation 30 Sept. 09 Completion  12 Sept. 2008 g gas at this data point  . 1.80 12.50 3.20 0 20 0 5 10 Arsenic ug_l Manganese_ug_l Methane mg l Costello  1V 2V Spud Date: 7/26/08 8/19/08 C  D / / 8 / / 8 l d Methane_mg_lComp Date 9/12/08 11/11/08 Stim Date 9/30 /09 1/10/09 Note incomplete data set 
  23. 23. 70300 HW6 Gesford 3 & 9 remediation  Methane isotope sampling  indicate Marcellus Shale  age gas at this data point 50 60 150 200 250 v May 23 & 24, 2010 age gas at this data point  10x ug/l 30 40 50 100 150 Eh in Mv Gesford 3 spud  July 28, 2008  mg/l     As  10 20 ‐50 0 y Methane  0‐100 Eh in Mv Methane mg/l Arsenic ug/lEh in Mv Methane mg/l Arsenic ug/l 7 9 11 5 7 9‐Jul‐08 9‐Jan‐09 9‐Jul‐09 9‐Jan‐10 9‐Jul‐10 9‐Jan‐11 9‐Jul‐11 9‐Jan‐12 pH
  24. 24. 70300 HW6 50 60 150 200 250 Mv     As 10x  30 40 50 100 150 Eh in M ane mg/l    Graph Cautions: Data was selected on basis of the most representative of well conditions .   Due to incomplete data description, in some cases data may not be  representative of the well or  the data was not plotted. Due to this  10 20 ‐50 0 Meth ug/l uncertainty, trend may differ with different data use. 0‐100 9‐Jul‐08 9‐Jan‐09 9‐Jul‐09 9‐Jan‐10 9‐Jul‐10 9‐Jan‐11 9‐Jul‐11 9‐Jan‐12 Eh in Mv Methane mg/l Arsenic ug/l Linear (Eh in Mv) Power (Methane mg/l) 7 9 11 5 7 9‐Jul‐08 9‐Jan‐09 9‐Jul‐09 9‐Jan‐10 9‐Jul‐10 9‐Jan‐11 9‐Jul‐11 9‐Jan‐12 pH
  25. 25. Type 3: Naturally Occurring  Contamination 
  26. 26. 350 400 16000 18000 HW47 ‐ No isotope  250 300 12000 14000 Mv&   in ug/l l No isotope  sample collected 150 200 8000 10000 Eh in M Arsenic  Methane in mg/l Post 1 No    20 0 100 150 4000 6000 Arsenic ug/l M Nov. 11, 2010 0 50 0 2000 Arsenic ug/l Methane ug/l Eh in Mv When no data is plotted,  no data was available.
  27. 27. Conclusions  Methane is released during the drilling and perhaps during the fracking process and other gas well work.  Methane is at significantly  higher concentrations in the aquifers after gas  Methane is at significantly  higher concentrations in the aquifers after gas  drilling and perhaps as a result of fracking and other gas well work.   The methane migrating into the aquifer is both from the shallower  (   ) f ti   d  ld  M ll  Sh l  ( d  h    (younger age) formations and older Marcellus Shale (and perhaps even  older formations).  Methane and other gases released during drilling (including air from the  drilling) apparently cause significant damage to the water quality.  In some cases the aquifers recover (under a year) but, in others cases the  damage is long term (greater than 3 years).damage is long term (greater than 3 years).

×