Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Abstract : Reality(Chess)
Marcel Moonen (2016) www.marcelmoonen.com
When I was younger we had a chess-computer. A plastic piece of
equipment with small lights on two sides of the board. You ...
3 different projections of the Overlook Maze – The Shining (Kubrick)
http://www.collativelearning.com/the%20shining%20-%20...
Projection 5: Danny stepping
back in his own footsteps{Prismatic thinking},
tricking Jack
Projection 6: Jack continues to ...
3 Different opinions
(A)Movie analyst Ager about using spatial anomalies in the Shining:
Since Kubrick was a perfectionist...
Bridge
From the Shining to chess
"In chess so much depends on opening theory{pyramid} so the champions before the last
century did not know as much as I do...
M. Carlsen (worldchampion 2016) is described often as an intuitive chess player.
What does he think?
The fact that I can b...
{Hypothesis}
:
{Computer}vs{Computer}
Both computers are using
the optimal strategy
You used to play tic tac toe until you figured out how to play in order to guarantee a
stalemate no matter what. Then it g...
50-move rule in chess states that a player can claim a draw if no capture has been made and no pawn has
been moved in the ...
The Shannon number, named after Claude Shannon, is a conservative lower
bound (not an estimate) of the game-tree complexit...
Chess 1/2
{Computer}vs{Computer}
White wins
{?}
Black wins
{?}
Draw
{?}
Marcel Moonen (2016)
Let’s draw it
First frame - {Computer}vs{Computer}={player A}vs{player B}={light point A}vs{light point B}
Visualized in unactivated spa...
2nd frame and further on - {Computer}vs{Computer}={player A}vs{player B}={Serie of vectors A}vs{Serie of vectors B}
Both c...
Closeup - {Computer}vs{Computer}={player A}vs{player B}={Serie of vectors A}vs{Serie of vectors B}
So if both computers wo...
All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy – The Shining (Kubrick)
Chess 2/2
{Computer}vs{Computer}
White wins
{No}
Black wins
{No}
Draw
{No}
{No}
Play
Marcel Moonen (2016)
Marcel Moonen – Opening (2016)
So how does the play start?
Something has to force the first move, push the button, create the
inbalance{asymetry} necesar...
(Projection 2){Closeup} {Deep Space} (Hubble
Telescope) – What first seemed as merely
inactive void{darkness} becomes visi...
There are several issues which I will further discuss in upcoming
presentations.
How a series of projections add up in a s...
Paul Wunderlich – Gut getroffen (1983)
IBM played on surface
Chess
Malevich defined surface
Black square
Mondriaan moved surface
Victory Boogie Woogie
Van Gogh q...
www.marcelmoonen.com
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Abstract : Reality(Chess) - Marcel Moonen (Pt. 3)

2,026 views

Published on

In this 3rd excerpt Abstract:Reality(Chess) I use the idea of chess to deeper analyse the third proposed system{prisma}, the critical moment of creativity.

Like always, this presentation will be edited during time.

Published in: Education

Abstract : Reality(Chess) - Marcel Moonen (Pt. 3)

  1. 1. Abstract : Reality(Chess) Marcel Moonen (2016) www.marcelmoonen.com
  2. 2. When I was younger we had a chess-computer. A plastic piece of equipment with small lights on two sides of the board. You would havee to do the physical translation for its {abstract}thoughts (moving the pieces to the {with lights}marked positions). It was not easy to win from the computer, at least not for me. Luckily you could make some steps back and go another route, sort of trick him{reality}. It is a computer, it could not comprehend that anyway{pyramid}. Chapter three: Abstract : Reality (Chess) In this excerpt I use the idea of chess to deeper analyse the third proposed system in the process of creation{prisma}, the critical moment of creativity. To fully understand this chapter I recommend to briefly read chapter 1 and 2.
  3. 3. 3 different projections of the Overlook Maze – The Shining (Kubrick) http://www.collativelearning.com/the%20shining%20-%20chap%204.html(Ager) 4th projections of the {Overlook} Maze, used as stage set design – The Shining (Kubrick)
  4. 4. Projection 5: Danny stepping back in his own footsteps{Prismatic thinking}, tricking Jack Projection 6: Jack continues to follow the footsteps{Pyramidical way of thinking}, till a dead end In the Shining there are a total of 6 different projections on the shape of the maze. With these 6 different projections the viewer constructs a personal reality of a shapeless entity, based on spatial anomalies. To what extend was this a deliberate choice in the process of creation?
  5. 5. 3 Different opinions (A)Movie analyst Ager about using spatial anomalies in the Shining: Since Kubrick was a perfectionist, anything that seems like an error in Kubrick’s work must not be an error, but must instead be a deliberate choice. {pyramical construct} (B)Screenwriter John August about using spatial anomalies : Any film subjected to the kind of scrutiny applied here will reveal moments of spatial impossibility. {mutation of the pyramidical construct} (C) Kubrick’s brother-in-law and exec-producer of the Shining Jan Harlan about using spatial anomalies: The set was very deliberately built to be offbeat and off the track,..The audience is deliberately made to not know where they're going. People say The Shining doesn't make sense. Well spotted! It's a ghost movie. It's not supposed to make sense.“ (interview with the Guardian) The different projections of the Maze (and the Overlook hotel itself) can never add up into a definitive shape. Personal hypothetis: Spatial anomalies are a characteristic of moviemaking. Kubrick used spatial anomalies{mutation of a pyramidical constructs} as a motiv throughout the movie to create a spooky effect.
  6. 6. Bridge From the Shining to chess
  7. 7. "In chess so much depends on opening theory{pyramid} so the champions before the last century did not know as much as I do and other players do about opening theory...Memorisation is enormously powerful. Some kid of fourteen today, or even younger, could get an opening advantage against Capablanca,and especially against the players of the previous century, like Morphy and Steinitz. Maybe they would still be able to outplay the young kid of today. Or maybe not, because nowadays when you get the opening advantage not only do you get the opening advantage, you know how to play, they have so many examples of what to do from this position... and that is why I don’t like chess any more... It is all just memorization and prearrangement...“ – Bobby Fisher Carlsen (age 13) vs Kasparov (age 41) Carlsen vs Kasparov – After game ending in a draw Serie of two rapid games (2004 Iceland) 1 Draw (Carlsen playing white) 1 Win (Kasparov playing white)
  8. 8. M. Carlsen (worldchampion 2016) is described often as an intuitive chess player. What does he think? The fact that I can be considered an intuitive chess player, I think, partly comes from my early experiences (as a child), where I put all those hours with myself on the chess board and tried out things. It meant that I eventually got a feel for chess, an understanding of the game. General good players use more long-term memory than short-term memory during a chess game. You use past experiences. It is the intuition that is largely based on the past experiences. So it is your experience that gives you a different impression of the new situations before you and then you have to consider what impression you can use. You must be able to continuously make up your mind about which past experience that can be used. It may be that you use them exactly in the situation you are in, or if there are any nuances that are different. I think that I largely am able to make good decisions based on past experience {pyramidical construct}. There are of course many who have a lot of the same knowledge that I have, but who are unable to make good decisions based on the same knowledge. {prismatic} What if we could build a computer using the optimal strategy and let it play against exact the same super computer using the optimal playing strategy?
  9. 9. {Hypothesis} : {Computer}vs{Computer} Both computers are using the optimal strategy
  10. 10. You used to play tic tac toe until you figured out how to play in order to guarantee a stalemate no matter what. Then it got boring, and you haven't played tic tac toe since. {Computer} vs {Computer} Tic-Tac-Toe, between two computers(perfect play) would end in a draw. Tic-Tac-Toe – possibility tree{asymetrical play, finite}
  11. 11. 50-move rule in chess states that a player can claim a draw if no capture has been made and no pawn has been moved in the last fifty moves. If players claim the 50-move rule when possible, then chess is finite{motion lock}. However, the draw is not automatic. It has to be correctly claimed by a player. Coming back to the Shining and the use of projections. Is a tree the correct abstraction for this question or is it a mere projection of reality? (is there more than one origin)? Images from: Travel along the chess tree – V. Bazhenov (http://www.e3e5.com/article.php?id=1009) {asymetrical play, technically infinite positions}
  12. 12. The Shannon number, named after Claude Shannon, is a conservative lower bound (not an estimate) of the game-tree complexity of chess of 10120, based on an average of about 103 possibilities for a pair of moves consisting of a move for White followed by one for Black, and a typical game lasting about 40 such pairs of moves. Shannon calculated it to demonstrate the impracticality of solving chess by brute force, in his 1950 paper "Programming a Computer for Playing Chess“. (This influential paper introduced the field of computer chess.) {..What if the games were lasting longer? Players who want to compete at high level will be unsatisfied with quick draws, and that means more moves per game, which means more permutations possible} Mathematician John Nash: "any game with a finite number of moves has at least one equlibrium outcome {white wins, black wins, or draw game}" That is, there is at least one result (or strategy) from which neither player would wish to deviate. In other words, there is at least one strategy, or algorithm, for playing chess that will be favored, no matter what. About the amount of possibilities:
  13. 13. Chess 1/2 {Computer}vs{Computer} White wins {?} Black wins {?} Draw {?} Marcel Moonen (2016)
  14. 14. Let’s draw it
  15. 15. First frame - {Computer}vs{Computer}={player A}vs{player B}={light point A}vs{light point B} Visualized in unactivated space(darkness).
  16. 16. 2nd frame and further on - {Computer}vs{Computer}={player A}vs{player B}={Serie of vectors A}vs{Serie of vectors B} Both computers would use the optimal strategy to beat eachother, so random moves(mutations) are not considered. Light point A becomes a serie of points, vector A is the outcome, B responds, vector B is the outcome A sequence of vectors will follow, in which A reacts on B, B on a A, and so on. Unactivated space becomes activated{past experience start to be visible, routes are mapped}
  17. 17. Closeup - {Computer}vs{Computer}={player A}vs{player B}={Serie of vectors A}vs{Serie of vectors B} So if both computers would play with perfect strategy, A would chase B(using past experience) B would chase A(using past experience), They would chase eachothers tale, on an ever shrinking surface. The result is a vicious loop. All this movement would cost energy(E). So the perfect strategy for the computer(their projection of reality) would be: Never move.
  18. 18. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy – The Shining (Kubrick)
  19. 19. Chess 2/2 {Computer}vs{Computer} White wins {No} Black wins {No} Draw {No} {No} Play Marcel Moonen (2016)
  20. 20. Marcel Moonen – Opening (2016)
  21. 21. So how does the play start? Something has to force the first move, push the button, create the inbalance{asymetry} necesarry to play the game. Make from {a still}, a frame of a complete sequence, based on keypoints, a play. Let’s turn things around. We play a game of rapid chess{time limit}. What if the players are humans who had to do the physical translation and the computer just had to push the button to start? Tic, tac, tic, tac,... To force an action, we have to use another action.(Newton: Action=Reaction) . To force the first action, we have use something else: (E)motion, start the sequence, start time.
  22. 22. (Projection 2){Closeup} {Deep Space} (Hubble Telescope) – What first seemed as merely inactive void{darkness} becomes visible {colourful spots and smudges : stars and galaxies(common interpretation)}. When we look back in time, we move closer to the subject to see past action at play. Inactivate space, what seemed to be a void with small white lights (the formally pyramidical construct of our reality) is full with colourful lights(prismatic effect). (Projection 1) Space, seemingly huge amount of unactivated space with small white points{darkness}
  23. 23. There are several issues which I will further discuss in upcoming presentations. How a series of projections add up in a sense of reality. How memories are positioned and ordered in our mind using the analogy to deep space. Who invented Chess? Nobody knows that
  24. 24. Paul Wunderlich – Gut getroffen (1983)
  25. 25. IBM played on surface Chess Malevich defined surface Black square Mondriaan moved surface Victory Boogie Woogie Van Gogh questioned its true surface Sunflowers Marcel Moonen (2016)
  26. 26. www.marcelmoonen.com

×