SDT2012 (P4.2): Understanding drivers of customer journeys

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This presentation was part of the SDT2012 - the 1st international conference on service design and tourism, Innsbruck/Austria, August 23-24, 2012. For more info on the conference and other presentations visit: www.sdt2012.com. All rights reserved by the author(s):

Geke van Dijk, United Kingdom
STBY

Dr. Geke van Dijk is co-founder and Strategy Director of STBY in London and Amsterdam. She is also the initiator and chair of the Service Design Network Netherlands, and co-founder of the Reach Network for Global Design Research. Geke has a background in ethnographic research, user-centered design, and services marketing & innovation. She is passionate about exploring the ways people co-produce their customer journeys by picking and mixing from multi-channel service touch points. She holds a PhD in Computer Sciences from the Open University in the UK. Her PhD research was co-supervised by the Business School of the OU.
email: geke@stby.eu
twitter: hellogeke

Bas Raijmakers, United Kingdom
STBY

Dr. Bas Raijmakers is co-founder and Creative Director of STBY in London and Amsterdam, and co-founder of the Reach Network for Global Design Research. STBY is specialised in design research for service innovation, and works for clients in industry and the public sector. Bas has a background in cultural studies, the internet industry, and interaction design. His main passion is to bring people we design for into design and innovation processes, using visual storytelling. He holds a PhD in Interaction Design from the Royal College of Art in London. He is also Reader in Strategic Creativity at Design Academy Eindhoven.
email: bas@stby.eu
twitter: hellobas

Understanding drivers of customer journeys
Contemporary travel is fragmented, even if you look at the customer journeys of one individual. Why is people’s behaviour not more consistent and predictable? The answer lies in the differences in the circumstances of each of these customer journeys, PhD research of one of the authors has found, based on UK field work on peoples travelling and holidays. This principle has recently been applied in a study in The Netherlands, where the behaviour of train travellers was studied to understand how railway stations can create better services. In particular, the design of these services focuses on stations undergoing extensive upgrading works whilst fully functioning. Distinguishing between routine journeys such as commutes and incidental journeys such as holidays and day trips helped greatly to find opportunities for Service Design, design concepts and create prototypes.

 This presentation will demonstrate the influence of peoples temporary circumstances on their customer journeys in general, illustrated through the train travellers study, and the opportunities this offers to Service Design.

SDT2012 (P4.2): Understanding drivers of customer journeys

  1. 1. Understanding drivers ofcustomer journeysEmbracing multi-channel and fragmented consumer behaviourDr. Geke van Dijk Dr. Bas RaijmakersStrategy Director STBY Creative Director STBYgeke@stby.eu bas@stby.eu@hellogeke @hellobas ..STBY...
  2. 2. ..STBY... London / Amsterdam Design Research for Service Innovation
  3. 3. Consumer-driven innovationThroughout the service innovationprocess, design and strategy teamsneed to engage with the people theyare creating services for. ..STBY...
  4. 4. STBY facilitates empathicconversationsBy producing engaging materials withconsumers or citizensBy exploring insights with multi-disciplinary teamsBy creating new service concepts withdesigners and strategists ..STBY...
  5. 5. In-depth qualitativeethnographic researchExamples of methods:• Observations• Interviews• User Labs• Design documentaries• Persona creation• Diary studies• Probe studies• Co-creation workshops• Lead User Research ..STBY...
  6. 6. Service Innovation for Tourism and Travel ..STBY...
  7. 7. Service Innovation for Tourism and TravelConsumer behaviour while preparing trips is highly fragmented ..STBY...
  8. 8. Service innovation for Tourism and TravelConsumer behaviour while preparing trips is highly fragmentedPeople use multiple channels in parallel, and their migrationbetween channels may seem erratic ..STBY...
  9. 9. Service innovation for Tourism and TravelConsumer behaviour while preparing trips is highly fragmentedPeople use multiple channels in parallel, and their migratingbetween channels may seem erraticAs consumer behaviour is difficult to predict, it is hard to provideone-stop service offering ..STBY...
  10. 10. Service innovation for Tourism and TravelConsumer behaviour while preparing trips is highly fragmentedPeople use multiple channels in parallel, and their migratingbetween channels may seem erraticAs consumer behaviour is difficult to predict, it is hard to provideone-stop service offeringTry to understand what the drivers for this behaviour are, andprovide open and flexible service elements to cater for this ..STBY...
  11. 11. WHY?Contemporary consumption & service economy ..STBY...
  12. 12. Information societyConsumers are media literate, wellinformed and pro-active. They expectcontrol over the consumption process. ..STBY...
  13. 13. Self-service technologyInformation and communicationtechnology offer opportunities forcustomers to do extensive researchand engage in direct negotiations. ..STBY...
  14. 14. Multi-channel useConsumers use more than one channelto get in contact and do business withservice providers. ..STBY...
  15. 15. Service economy Product related transactions are no longer key to customer relationships. Support, updates, and advice are integrated in Product-Service Systems.15 ..STBY...
  16. 16. In each stage of the consumption process consumers can choosewhich service elements they want to use.Organisations need to offer optimal and flexible servicesthrough multiple channels ..STBY...
  17. 17. HOW?Service Design approach ..STBY...
  18. 18. The consumer is in control ..STBY... ..STBY... .
  19. 19. CustomerSocial environment Multi-channel service offering Work from perspective of customers. Pay attention to social and multi-channel context of the service encounter. ..STBY... ..STBY... .
  20. 20. CustomerSocial environment Multi-channel service offering Consider overall path from first trigger to final completion ---> Customer Journey ..STBY... ..STBY... .
  21. 21. CustomerSocial environment Multi-channel service offering Consider all contacts between customer and organisation ---> Touchpoints ..STBY... ..STBY... .
  22. 22. EXAMPLE 1Multi-channel use for leisure travel ..STBY...
  23. 23. Pick & Mix Research into multi- channel use for consumer leisure travel . Qualitative research among 28 participants throughout UK. Staged data collection (serial interviews & diary study). ..STBY...
  24. 24. Look beyond ‘snapshots’ of internet usage andtransactionsBreder kijken dan ‘snapshots’ van internetgebruik entransacties ..STBY...
  25. 25. ‘Travel Stories’ about recent trips ..STBY...
  26. 26. ..STBY...
  27. 27. Example from travel research ..STBY...
  28. 28. ..STBY...
  29. 29. ..STBY...
  30. 30. Insights on multi-channel useMany consumers voluntarily use more than one channel, andactively migrate between them.Contemporary consumers expect ample choice and control overtransactions.Succesful services:• Support parallel use of channels• Support migration between channels ..STBY...
  31. 31. EXAMPLE 2Service innovation for train travellers ..STBY...
  32. 32. What drives the behaviour of train travellers?
  33. 33. Observations & initial interviews
  34. 34. 3 Key moments and 10 patterns of movements ..STBY...
  35. 35. Client workshop:Opportunities & priorities for improvement
  36. 36. Further investigation into distinction betweenincidental vs frequent trips

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