cover page
Aronimink Station Area PlanTABLE OF CONTENTS1ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 4EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4INTRODUCTIONPLANNING PURPOSE 5PLANNING P...
4Aronimink Station Area PlanACKNOWLEDGEMENTSWe would like to thank the following individuals for their time,comments and i...
Aronimink Station Area Plan5PLANNING PURPOSEThe Aronimink Station area has experienced a decline in recentyears as it stru...
6Aronimink Station Area PlanHISTORICAL CONTEXTDEVELOPMENT OF UPPER DARBY TOWNSHIPUpper Darby was first settled in 1688 and...
Aronimink Station Area Plan7DEMOGRAPHICSIn examining the existing conditions of this area, it is importantto understand so...
8Aronimink Station Area PlanRACE AND ETHNICITYThe racial and ethnic composition of the study area is relativelystable, wit...
Aronimink Station Area Plan9EMPLOYMENTThis chart reflets the increase in the number of jobs between 1998and 2001. Because ...
10Aronimink Station Area PlanDEVELOPMENT PATTERNSURBAN PATTERNThe urban pattern of the Upper Darby Township is defined by ...
Aronimink Station Area Plan11LANDMARKSTHE WAVERLY THEATERThe Waverly Theater was built in 1927 by Thomas Sheridan.Currentl...
12Aronimink Station Area PlanEXISTING LAND USECURRENT COMMERCIAL USAGEThe study area presents uses that range from high de...
Aronimink Station Area Plan13EXISTING ZONINGThe current zoning pattern surrounding the Aronimink Station areais very diver...
14Aronimink Station Area PlanINCONSISTENCIESThere are several current land uses inconsistent with the zoningdesignations f...
Aronimink Station Area Plan15TRANSPORTATIONPUBLIC TRANSPORTATIONSEPTA trolley route 101, which runs from the 69th Street T...
16Aronimink Station Area PlanARONIMINK STATION AREA ROADWAYSIn the analysis of roadways in the planning area, hourly traff...
Aronimink Station Area Plan17TRANSPORTATIONFERNE BOULEVARDThe eighty-eight feet wide Ferne Boulevard has one travel lane i...
18Aronimink Station Area PlanPEDESTRIAN ENVIRONMENTDue to poor pedestrian accessibility to destinationswithin the planning...
Aronimink Station Area Plan19CURRENTCONDITIONSMARKET ASSESSMENTMARKET ASSESSMENTThis market study has been conducted to pr...
20Aronimink Station Area PlanISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIESISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIESClient interviews and the current conditions ...
Aronimink Station Area Plan21ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
22Aronimink Station Area PlanTHE PLANTHE PLANThe Aronimink Station area has many of the features of a downtown:neighborhoo...
Aronimink Station Area Plan23THE PLANSITEPLAN
24Aronimink Station Area PlanAREA IDENTITYThe Aronimink Station area has many features of a downtown. It isrecommended tha...
Aronimink Station Area Plan25• PromotionMarketing the traditional commercial district’s assets tocustomers, potential inve...
26Aronimink Station Area PlanGATEWAYSThe intersections on Burmont Road at State Road and at FerneBoulevard have been desig...
Aronimink Station Area Plan27The most noticeable features of the intersection of Burmont Roadand Ferne Boulevard are the M...
28Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSThis section of the report illustrates ideas for streetscape improve-...
Aronimink Station Area Plan29CONTINUITYTo create a coherent and distinct identity for the area, gaps andedges need to be t...
30Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #1: BURMONT ROADDefinition: Neighborhood ...
Aronimink Station Area Plan31SECTION DRAWING #2: BURMONT ROADDefinition: Neighborhood retail storefronts in the Neighborho...
32Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #3: BURMONT ROADDefinition: Commercial la...
Aronimink Station Area Plan33STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #4: BURMONT ROADDefinition: Commercial la...
34Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #5: FERNE BOULEVARDDefinition: Neighborho...
Aronimink Station Area Plan35STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #6: MORGAN AVENUEDefinition: Neighborhood...
36Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #7: MORGAN AVENUEDefinition: Neighborhood...
Aronimink Station Area Plan37STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #8: STATE ROADDefinition: Commercial land...
38Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #9: STATE ROADDefinition: Commercial land...
Aronimink Station Area Plan39SECTION DRAWING #10: WOODLAND AVENUEDefinition: Neighborhood retail storefronts in the Histor...
40Aronimink Station Area PlanDESIGN GUIDELINESAdopting design guidelines will aid in revitalizing the AroniminkStation are...
Aronimink Station Area Plan41The photo on the previous page is an example of good signage fromthe main street district in ...
42Aronimink Station Area Planadvertisements for a business itself or advertisements for theproducts it sells.Advertisement...
Aronimink Station Area Plan43BUILDING HEIGHTIt is recommended that no buildings greater than five stories beconstructed in...
44Aronimink Station Area PlanTRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENTSPhysical enhancements and improvements to Burmont Road, FernBoulev...
Aronimink Station Area Plan45PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTSThefollowingpedestrianimprovementsneedtobemadethroughoutthe site. Sugg...
46Aronimink Station Area PlanThe maps above show the various pedestrian improvements recommended in this plan.NORTHWEST GA...
Aronimink Station Area Plan47PARKING IMPROVEMENTSTo accommodate the parking needs expressed by the customersof the area, t...
48Aronimink Station Area Plansegment of the fence on the north side• Convert Rite Aid parking into short term metered spac...
Aronimink Station Area Plan49COMMERCIALREVITALIZATIONWAVERLY THEATERCOMMERCIAL REVITALIZATIONOne of the goals of the Aroni...
50Aronimink Station Area PlanThe photographs above show the Doylestown County Theater in itsoriginal form on the left, in ...
Aronimink Station Area Plan513. Landscape: The addition of trees, and flowers to enhancethe experience of pedestrians walk...
52Aronimink Station Area PlanPOST OFFICEPOST OFFICEAnother structure with historic qualities is the Post Office. The PostO...
Aronimink Station Area Plan53ARONIMINK STATIONThe Aronimink Station building is a critical anchor for the planningarea and...
54Aronimink Station Area PlanThe photographs on in the left column are pictures of theAronimink Station. The photographs o...
Aronimink Station Area Plan55VACANT LOTSCOMMERCIALREVITALIZATIONVACANT LOTS“TRIANGLE” LOTThe “Triangle” lot is located on ...
56Aronimink Station Area PlanVACANT LOTSCOMMERCIALREVITALIZATION740 BURMONT ROADGiven the size and location of the vacant ...
Aronimink Station Area Plan57EXISTING AND PROPOSED DEVELOPMENTEXISTING AND PROPOSED DEVELOPMENTThe table below summarizes ...
58Aronimink Station Area PlanNEXT STEPSIMPLEMENTATIONNEXT STEPS FOR ORGANIZING COMMUNITY BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONINFORMANDGATH...
Aronimink Station Area Plan59IMPLEMENTATIONFUNDINGFUNDINGFOR OVERALL AREA REVITALIZATIONMAIN STREET PROGRAMThe Main Street...
60Aronimink Station Area PlanIMPLEMENTATIONTIMELINETIMELINE FOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVESTime Frame  Immediate Steps(3-6 month...
Aronimink Station Area Plan61TIMELINEIMPLEMENTATIONTIMELINE FOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES (CONTINUED)Time Frame Immediate Step...
62Aronimink Station Area PlanREFERENCESREFERENCES“About the Main Street Program” websitehttp://www.mainstreet.org/About/fa...
Aronimink Station Area Plan63“Institute of Transportation Engineers, Intersection Design andSafety Toolbox” Websitehttp://...
64Aronimink Station Area PlanTown of Islip, New York. “Commercial Design Guidelines.” May1990“Upper Darby Township Officia...
Aronimink Station Area Plan65MERCHANT SURVEYAronimink Station Area February 13, 2004Business Name: _______________________...
66Aronimink Station Area Plan5. In what community do you live?___ Upper Darby___ Elsewhere: _________________________6. In...
Aronimink Station Area Plan6710. Over the past five years, have you noticed an increase or decrease in the number of your ...
68Aronimink Station Area PlanAPPENDIXAMERCHANT SURVEY15. How has the business district changed in the past five years? ___...
Aronimink Station Area Plan69APPENDIXBDOWNTOWN ACTION PLANDOWNTOWN ACTION PLAN ELEMENTS BASED ONTHE FOUR POINT APPROACH OF...
70Aronimink Station Area PlanAPPENDIXCAMBLER CASE STUDYAMBLER CASE STUDYAmbler Main Street is a non-profit organization th...
Aronimink Station Area Plan71APPENDIXDADDITIONAL TRANSPORTATION INFORMATIONLand Use Minimum Required Number of SpacesBusin...
72Aronimink Station Area PlanPROGRAM DESCRIPTIONThis program is intended to improve the quality of life in our communities...
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Aronimink Station Area Plan

  1. 1. cover page
  2. 2. Aronimink Station Area PlanTABLE OF CONTENTS1ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 4EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4INTRODUCTIONPLANNING PURPOSE 5PLANNING PROCESS 5STUDY AREA DESCRIPTION 5HISTORICAL CONTEXT 6CURRENT CONDITIONSDEMOGRAPHICS 7DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS 10LANDMARKS 11EXISTING LAND USE 12EXISTING ZONING 13TRANSPORTATION 15MARKET ASSESSMENT 19ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES 20THE PLAN 22VISION STATEMENT 22GOALS 22AREA IDENTITY 24PROPOSAL FOR MAIN STREET ORGANIZATION 24GATEWAYS 26STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS 28DESIGN GUIDELINES 40TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENTS 44TRAFFIC FLOW IMPROVEMENTS 44PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS 45PARKING IMPROVEMENTS 47MORGAN AVENUE 48COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION 49WAVERLY THEATER 49POST OFFICE 52ARONIMINK STATION 53VACANT LOTS 55EXISTING AND PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT 57IMPLEMENTATIONNEXT STEPS 58FUNDING 59FOR OVERALL AREA REVITALIZATION 59FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION 59TIMELINE FOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 60REFERENCES 62APPENDICESAPPENDIX A: MERCHANT SURVEY 65APPENDIX B: DOWNTOWN ACTION PLAN 69APPENDIX C: AMBLER CASE STUDY 70APPENDIX D: ADDITIONAL TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION 71APPENDIX E: DETAILS ON FUNDING SOURCES 75APPENDIX F: IMPORTANT CONTACT INFORMATION 77
  3. 3. 4Aronimink Station Area PlanACKNOWLEDGEMENTSWe would like to thank the following individuals for their time,comments and input.Our Clients : Jim Glatts, Joann Cook, Helen Horn and Donna VesciOur Instructors: Gabriela Cesarino, Paul Rookwood, and Nancy Zoblfrom the firm Wallace, Roberts and Todd, LLCThe University of Pennsylvania School of Design Faculty and StaffThe Local Business Owners of the Aronimink Station AreaBernadette Dougherty, Ambler Main Street ManagerTom Smith, Sellers Library ArchivistThomas DiFilippo, Author of The History and Development of UpperDarby TownshipAndrew Dobshinsky for his software expertiseEXECUTIVE SUMMARYThe vision of the Aronimink Station Area Plan is to create a vibrantmain street for Drexel Hill where pedestrians, transit-users, anddrivers alike will enjoy shopping, dining and entertainment.Formulated by five University of Pennsylvania Master of CityPlanning students in the spring of 2004, this vision was createdto address revitalization needs identified by four area residentsand business owners. The report includes analysis that led to thisvision and implementation strategies that will help to achieve thisvision. It begins with an overview of the site including site historyand current conditions. Then the key issues and opportunities forthe area are identified, followed by the vision statement, goals, andplan for action.The goals for the Aronimink Station Area Plan are to create adistinct identity for the area, to make transportation improvements,and to revitalize the commercial district. According to therecommendations of this plan, retail space will be increased by7000 feet, twenty-four new residential units will be added, andseventy-four new parking spaces will be added. A future site plandetails all the suggested improvements.The objectives for creating a distinct identity for the AroniminkStation area include forming a Main Street Organization, creatinggatewaysatthesiteboundaries,makingstreetscapeimprovements,and implementing design guidelines. The objectives for improvingthe transportation through this area include traffic flow, pedestrian,and parking improvements. The objectives for revitalizing thecommercial district include restoring key landmarks and infillingvacant lots.The report concludes with implementation strategies, including asummary of next steps, funding sources, and a timeline. With theactive involvement of area residents, business owners, and otherstakeholders, the Aronimink Station Area Plan can be used as atool to guide the revitalization process.ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS AND EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
  4. 4. Aronimink Station Area Plan5PLANNING PURPOSEThe Aronimink Station area has experienced a decline in recentyears as it struggles to balance automotive and pedestrianneeds. The purpose of this plan is to identify the key issues andopportunitiesfortheAroniminkStationarea,andtogivesuggestionsto area residents and business owners on how this area could berevitalized.PLANNING PROCESSIn the spring of 2004, a project team consisting of five first-yeargraduate students in the Department of City and Regional Planningat the University of Pennsylvania were given the assignment todevelop a plan for the Aronimink Station area. The students wereguided by professionals who supervised the planning process. Areabusiness and resident representatives were designated as clientsfor this project. These clients gave important feedback that helpedthe students understand the planning problem and what changeswere desired.Data were compiled from a variety of sources such as the U.S.Census and the Upper Darby zoning codes. A merchant surveyof area businesses was conducted to help analyze the currentmarket conditions. The students selected relevant case studiesand met with leaders from the local and surrounding communities.Additionally, they developed a physical assessment of the site bytaking measurements and photographs, observing traffic andparking conditions, and noting the design features of the area. Uponanalyzing these data, the students have made recommendationswhich are given in detail in this report.STUDY AREA DESCRIPTIONThis plan focuses on the area surrounding the Aronimink Stationin Upper Darby Township, an inner-ring suburb in Delaware Countyjust west of Philadelphia,Pennsylvania. The Aronimink Station is astop on the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority’s(SEPTA) trolley route 101. The focus area, a commercial district onBurmont Road between Ferne Boulevard and State Road, is part ofthe Drexel Hill neighborhood of Upper Darby Township.Above: Map of Upper DarbyTownship, Aronimink Station areahighlighted in red. Right: Mapof Aronimink Station area, siteboundary highlighted in read.INTRODUCTION
  5. 5. 6Aronimink Station Area PlanHISTORICAL CONTEXTDEVELOPMENT OF UPPER DARBY TOWNSHIPUpper Darby was first settled in 1688 and was incorporated as aTownship in 1736. In 1907, the Philadelphia Rapid Transit line wasextended throughout the area. In 1916, John McClatchy purchasedthirty acres of cow pasture in order to develop the area surroundingthe 69th Street Terminal.69TH STREET TERMINAL AREAMcClatchy began his plans for developing a shopping district aroundthe 69th Street Terminal in 1920. Construction of this districtbegan in 1928. The McClatchy Building and Tower Theater werecompleted that same year. The 69th Street Terminal shopping andcultural district was a novel idea developed well before suburbanshopping malls came into vogue. According to the book on UpperDarby’s development by Thomas DiFilippo, “by 1930 the shoppingcenter ranked second only to Center City Philadelphia in retail sales”(96).DEVELOPMENT OF FERNE BOULEVARDAnother developer, Thomas Sheridan, made plans to create ashopping district to compete with the 69th street shopping districton Ferne Boulevard in the late 1920s. Sheridan had originallyplanned to build Ferne Boulevard as a wide boulevard with a clusterof stores to attract customers riding the nearby trolley. This areawas called Aronimink Golf Estates and was completed in October1927. It included the Waverly Theater and the ninety-foot boulevard.At this time, ten stores and twenty-one efficiency apartments werebeing constructed along the boulevard. Ferne Boulevard wasoriginally planned to be a grand development, but plans were scaleddown during the Great Depression (DiFilippo 104).The Waverly Theater was built by Stanley Corporation of America. Itwas originally supposed to be called “The Drexel” but the name waslater changed to Waverly.ARONIMINK STATION AREA PLANThe transit-oriented developments by McClatchy and Sheridandid not take into consideration the increasing popularity of theautomobile and have suffered congestion and deterioration as aresult.In order to revitalize the area, the Aronimink Station Area Plan seeksto merge Sheridan’s original intentions with the transportation andland use constraints of today.INTRODUCTION
  6. 6. Aronimink Station Area Plan7DEMOGRAPHICSIn examining the existing conditions of this area, it is importantto understand some key population characteristics. In thisplan five pieces of demographic data were examined, includingpopulation growth, racial and ethnic population, median incomeand employment. U.S. Census data for the study area, definedby the block groups highlighted in yellow on the map below, werecompared to that of the Upper Darby Township, the surroundingBoroughs of Aldan, Clifton Heights, Lansdowne, and Yeadon, theTownships of Haverford and Springfield, and Bucks, Chester,Delaware, Philadelphia, and Montgomery Counties.POPULATION CHANGEThe Upper Darby Township as a whole was the only community outof the surrounding townships and boroughs to gain in populationover the last ten years. Additionally, the study area’s gain inpopulation kept pace with the Township. However, at less thanone percent, this gain is statistically unimportant and indicatesthe population of both the study area and the Township is stable.According to the 2000 U.S. Census, the population of Upper Darbywas about 82,000, and for the block group area it was 10,000.The population change in the immediate study area is indicative of amore fundamental population shift, with more familes with youngerchildren moving into the area.Source: U.S. Census BureauDEMOGRAPHICSCURRENTCONDITIONS
  7. 7. 8Aronimink Station Area PlanRACE AND ETHNICITYThe racial and ethnic composition of the study area is relativelystable, with little change between 1990 and 2000. During thistime, the white population as a percent of the total, declined from95% to 87%. The African-American population increased by 1.3%and the Asian and Pacific Islander population increased by 4.8%,while the hispanic population rose minimally. This 1.3% increase inthe African-American population, however, represented a doublingof the population in absolute numbers, much as the 4.8% increasein the Asian population represented a rise of 150% over the 1990numbers.Source: U.S. Census BureauMEDIAN INCOMEThe median income in the immediate study area, while still lowerthan that of the adjacent townships, it is significantly higher thanthe median income in the adjacent boroughs and the Upper DarbyTownship as a whole. This is significant for it indicates the populationin the Aronimink Station area has a relatively high amount of moneyavailable for non-essential spending.Source: U.S. Census BureauCURRENTCONDITIONSDEMOGRAPHICS
  8. 8. Aronimink Station Area Plan9EMPLOYMENTThis chart reflets the increase in the number of jobs between 1998and 2001. Because of the way this information is tabulated, the19026 zip code was used to approximate the boundaries of thestudy area. This data shows a an 8% increase in the number ofjobs in the immediate area, a rate of increase which topped all theother areas.Source: U.S. Census BureauDEMOGRAPHICSCURRENTCONDITIONS
  9. 9. 10Aronimink Station Area PlanDEVELOPMENT PATTERNSURBAN PATTERNThe urban pattern of the Upper Darby Township is defined by a gridthat runs north-south and east-west. There are four commercialdistricts in the Township that compete with our site, all highlightedin the map above. Burmont Road is used as a throughway whichdiagonally crosses the grid pattern of residential zone. BurmontRoad is one of the few roads that grants access across the trolleyrailway tracks connecting the north and south of the Township,This makes it a heavily trafficked road with several congestedintersections.FIGURE GROUND PATTERNThis figure ground study illustrates and distinguishes the uniformresidential pattern, that is interrupted by the commercial corridor.It is visible that the pattern along the three major intersections isnot continuous. This also shows the density of development in thearea as it exists today.DEVELOPMENT PATTERNSCURRENTCONDITIONS
  10. 10. Aronimink Station Area Plan11LANDMARKSTHE WAVERLY THEATERThe Waverly Theater was built in 1927 by Thomas Sheridan.Currently, two-thirds of the Waverly Theater building is being usedby Waverly Self-Storage. The other one-third is divided betweenMescellino’s Pizzeria and J.D. McGillicuddy’s Restaurant & Pub.Since the theater closed in the 1980s, several other businessespreviously used the building, The current uses do not utilize the fullpotential of this important historical landmark.THE POST OFFICEThe Post Office at BurmontRoad and WoodlandAvenue was built in 1927.The building is still used as aPost Office today, althoughthe United States PostalService has consideredmoving their operationsto another location andreducing their presence toa small storefront office. The Post Office owns and uses the twoadjacent parking lots for private purposes only.ARONIMINK STATIONThe Aronimink Station area grew initially as a transit-orienteddevelopment around the Philadelphia Rapid Transit line, built in1907, The trolley provided service between Upper Darby Townshipand Center City, Philadelphia, the primary employment center forthe region. Today it is served by SEPTA trolley route 101. Thestation building and its surroundings are in poor physical condition.LANDMARKSCURRENTCONDITIONS
  11. 11. 12Aronimink Station Area PlanEXISTING LAND USECURRENT COMMERCIAL USAGEThe study area presents uses that range from high densityresidential to retail and office. Most commercial uses arerestaurants, gas stations, dry cleaners and a few retail shops. Thesmaller commercial properties are located along Burmont Road,Woodland Avenue, Ferne Boulevard and Morgan Avenue. There arethree gas stations located on Burmont Road, about 700 feet fromeach other. Several fast food restaurants and bars are situated onBurmont Road and Ferne Boulevard. There are also several vacantcommercial spaces and two vacant lots.CURRENT RESIDENTIAL USAGEThere are three mid-rise multi family properties, several mixed userowhouses and single-family row houses. The surrounding areais made up of both detached and attached single-family housesand low-rise multi-family buildings, such as in Drexelbrook. AlongBurmont Road there are two- and three-story row houses in goodcondition. The mid-rise multi-family properties on Burmont Roadand Woodland Avenue are being renovated and the vacancy rate isrelatively low.CONTINUITYStateRoadisthenorthwestboundaryoftheplanningarea,andFerneBoulevard is the southeast boundary of the planning area. Theseboundaries were chosen in part because they are the transitionpoints from predominantly residential uses to predominantlycommercial uses. In the middle of the site between State Roadand Childs Avenue there is another transition from commercial toresidential back to commercial land uses. These major transitionsare shown in magenta on the map below. Minor transitions in landuse are show with black outlines.CURRENTCONDITIONSEXISTING LAND USE
  12. 12. Aronimink Station Area Plan13EXISTING ZONINGThe current zoning pattern surrounding the Aronimink Station areais very diverse. There are three distinct residential districts, R-1, R-2and R-3. The R-1 district permits only single-family detached homeswith special exceptions for schools, churches, hospitals, cemeteriesand outdoor swimming and tennis clubs. R-2 includes all the R-1permits, but also allows a minimum lot area of 5,000 square feetand a minimum street frontage of twenty feet less than R-1. R-3includes the uses allowed in R-1 and R-2 districts, and additionallyincludes two-family detached homes, apartment buildings thirty-fivefeet or less in height, retirement homes, and mobile home parks.The Aronimink Station area is zoned Neighborhood Commercial,designated C-1. The primary uses permitted in a C-1 districtinclude food stores, drug stores, bakeries, dry cleaners, banks andaccountant or insurance broker offices. The C-1 zoning district wasintended to create a commercial and service-oriented businesscorridor to meet the needs of individuals living in the immediateneighborhood of the Aronimink Station area.CURRENTCONDITIONSEXISTING ZONING
  13. 13. 14Aronimink Station Area PlanINCONSISTENCIESThere are several current land uses inconsistent with the zoningdesignations for the Aronimink Station area. For example the C-1designation, according to the Upper Darby zoning code regulations,does not allow the drive-in windows currently in use at the two studyarea banks. There are three gas stations within the area that arenot currently allowed by the C-1 zoning. C-2 zoning allows gasstations but section 502-n limits them to perform only minor repairsrelated to state inspections. C-1 section 501-A2a also specificallystates that no residential use is permitted in conjunction with thecommercial uses. There are also several mixed-use row houses,with commercial on the first floor and residential on the floorsabove. Inconsisten A new comprehensive plan for the Township hasrecently been completed and recommended zoning code changeswill address some of these inconsistencies.EXISTING LAND USECURRENTCONDITIONS
  14. 14. Aronimink Station Area Plan15TRANSPORTATIONPUBLIC TRANSPORTATIONSEPTA trolley route 101, which runs from the 69th Street Terminalto Media, stops at the Aronimink Station. There is also a bus routealong State Road that can be used for access to the planning area.Mass transit ridership in the area is low -- according to data from theU.S. Census, under four percent of people use public transportation.Most people choose to drive -- personal vehicle usage is the highestmode of transportation in the area, representing 88% of all trips.There are no parking facilities to accomodate park-and-ride transitusers at the Aronimink Station.The trolley service is frequent and generally on time. During themorning rush hour, the trolley comes approximately every four tonine minutes between 6:54 and 8:00 AM. During the evening rushhour, the trolley comes every nine to fifteen minutes between 4:30and 6:30 PM. Late evening and weekend service is less frequent,and the last stop at Aronimink Station is at 9:50 PM. To get fromAronimink Station to Center City Philadelphia, it takes an average ofthirty-eight minutes.UPPER DARBY ROADWAYSAs shown on the map above, roadways in Upper Darby fit intothree categories: arterial roads, collector roads, and local roads.Local roads are the small streets and roads that provide accessto neighborhoods and commercial areas. Collector roads “collect”the traffic from the smaller local roads and funnels it onto arterialroadways. Arterial roads are high-capacity thoroughfares that movevehicles across the Township and into the wider region.TRANSPORTATIONCURRENTCONDITIONS
  15. 15. 16Aronimink Station Area PlanARONIMINK STATION AREA ROADWAYSIn the analysis of roadways in the planning area, hourly traffic volumecounts along Burmont Road, Ferne Boulevard, and WoodlandAvenue were conducted. Traffic volume counts are expressed inrelation to specific time periods. Most roads in the study area haveone travel lane in each direction. A summary of road classificationsfor the Aronimink Station area is given in the map below.BURMONT ROADThe highest traffic counts observed in the study area are found onBurmont Road, most notably at its intersections with State Roadand Woodland Avenue. Burmont Road serves as a throughwayconnectingthenorthandsouthendsoftheTownship.BurmontRoadis where the majority of commercial uses in the site are located.According to this analysis, Burmont Road is a heavily traffickedstreet that is unsafe at times.The traffic counts along Burmont Road at both rush and non-rush hours were relatively close, signifying that Burmont Road isused constantly at throughout the day. Evening traffic counts onweeknights were lower than these daytime counts, but there is alot of traffic on Burmont Road on Friday and Saturday nights. Thearea near the intersection of Burmont Road and Ferne Boulevardis a major node for different transportation modes -- the trolley,motor vehicles, and pedestrians. The high level of activity in thisnode presents safety concerns.STATE ROADState Road can be classified as a minor arterial or major collectorroad. It connects with West Chester Pike, a large arterial road usedto access Philadelphia and the Main Line. Within the AroniminkStation area, State Road connects with Burmont Road.TRANSPORTATIONCURRENTCONDITIONS
  16. 16. Aronimink Station Area Plan17TRANSPORTATIONFERNE BOULEVARDThe eighty-eight feet wide Ferne Boulevard has one travel lane ineach direction and angled-parking on both sides between BurmontRoad and Valley Road.WOODLAND AVENUEWoodland Avenue is a collector road that runs parallel to the trolleyline.MORGAN AVENUEMorgan Avenue is a one-way road going east to west away fromBurmont Road.CURRENTCONDITIONS
  17. 17. 18Aronimink Station Area PlanPEDESTRIAN ENVIRONMENTDue to poor pedestrian accessibility to destinationswithin the planning area, the pedestrian flow rate is low.Unclear street signs, unmarked street crossings, ill-maintainedsidewalks, and sidewalk obstructions pose danger to pedestrians.Sidewalk obstructions caused by cars parked on the sidewalkare most frequent at the gas stations. Multiple curb-cuts andundefined entrances to the surface parking lots make it difficult forpedestrians to safely cross the sidewalks. All of the establishmentsin the Aronimink Station area have street frontage and sidewalkaccess.PARKINGThere are a number of large and small surface parking lots in thearea, as well as metered and free parking spaces along the streets.See Appendix ___ for an inventory of the existing parking conditions,which are shown graphically in the map below. While there is ageneral perception in the area that there are enough places topark, several surface lots are not being used to their maximumcapacity. The most accessible and frequently used surface lot isnext to Rite Aid between Burmont Road and Woodland Avenue.This lot has forty-one parking spaces, ten of which are designatedfor Rite Aid customers and the rest of which are for generalparking, used by customers of other businesses in the area. Thereis another large surface parking lot located at the corner of FerneBoulevard and Valley Road. This lot is frequently underutilized.Other lots include the four-space parking lot that primarily servesHeron Home Health customers on Morgan Avenue. Most of thehighly frequented locations have metered or free parking spacesavailable near their business, with the exception of the Post Office.CURRENTCONDITIONSTRANSPORTATION
  18. 18. Aronimink Station Area Plan19CURRENTCONDITIONSMARKET ASSESSMENTMARKET ASSESSMENTThis market study has been conducted to provide an understandingof the business climate in the Aronimink Station area and thesurrounding commercial developments that compete for consumerspending. A key concern that spurred the creation of this plan wasthe need to turn this area into a more commercially attractive andsuccessful business district.BUSINESS INVENTORYAn inventory of the businesses in the commercial district aresummarized in the table below.BUSINESS INVENTORYPersonal Services 13Restaurants 9Finance, Insurance, Real Estate 8Retail 8Vacant 7Other 5Automobile 4Bars 3Business Services 2Public 2TOTAL 61The thirteen personal service establishments include nail salons,hairdressers and a barber, laundry and dry cleaners, an upholsterer,a portrait artist, and a dance studio. The restaurants are almostexclusively either Chinese or pizza, with two exceptions. Those inthe “other” category include a liquor store, a self-storage business,a heating and air conditioning business, an auto parts distributor,and a VFW post.TRADE AREAA simple survey consisting of eighteen questions was completed bya sample of businesses in the Aronimink Station area (See AppendixA). These questions were used to assess the how merchants viewedthe business climate of the area, what they considered the identityof the area to be, and to establish a primary trade area, which isdepicted in the map below.MARKET ANALYSISCurrently, the Aronimink Station area businesses are not able tocompete with the larger commercial centers that exist aroundthe area. These centers, such as the Bond Shopping Center atState Road and Lansdowne Avenue, are usually anchored by a largegrocery store and are accompanied by many stores similar to thoselocated in the Aronimink Station area.
  19. 19. 20Aronimink Station Area PlanISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIESISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIESClient interviews and the current conditions analysis were used toidentify the key issues and opportunities for the Aronimink Stationarea. The map on the right visually summarizes these issues andopportunities.The issues of the Aronimink Station area are:• Lack of a distinct identity• Poor visual appearance• Traffic congestion• Unfriendly pedestrian environment• Perceived lack of parking• Decline in commercial activityThese issues can be turned into opportunities, and the remainingsections of this report discuss how these opportunities can berealized. As shown on the map, streetscape improvements arerecommended throughout the area. The central point of the site isthe intersection of Burmont Road, Drexel Avenue, and WoodlandAvenue. This point is the current as well as future center of activityfor the Aronimink Station area. Creating gateways at the northwestand southeast boundaries of the site will help with the area’s imagedevelopment. Improvements to traffic flow and the pedestrianenvironment are suggested. Rearrangement suggestions for theparking lots are given. Upgrading area landmarks and infilling vacantlots is recommended for increasing commercial activity. The issuesand opportunities summarized in the map are not comprehensive.They provide an overview of the kinds of improvements that arerecommended in this plan.
  20. 20. Aronimink Station Area Plan21ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
  21. 21. 22Aronimink Station Area PlanTHE PLANTHE PLANThe Aronimink Station area has many of the features of a downtown:neighborhood commercial retail, restaurants, and historic buildings.The underlying character of the site is that of a downtown, anddeveloping the area as a downtown is the most appropriate andmost feasible plan for revitalizing the area.VISION STATEMENTThe vision of the Aronimink Station Area Plan is to create a vibrantmain street for Drexel Hill where pedestrians, transit-users, anddrivers alike will enjoy shopping, dining, and entertainment.GOALSThe following three goals will help to achieve this vision:• Create a downtown identity for the Aronimink Station area• Make transportation improvements• Revitalize the commercial district
  22. 22. Aronimink Station Area Plan23THE PLANSITEPLAN
  23. 23. 24Aronimink Station Area PlanAREA IDENTITYThe Aronimink Station area has many features of a downtown. It isrecommended that a main street organization be formed in orderto help create its identity. Creating gateways, making streetscapeimprovements, and implementing design guidelines will lead tophysical improvements that lend to a distinct main street identity.Gateways will serve as official entrances to the area, making thedesignation of this area distinctive. Streetscape improvements willflesh out the main street image throughout the site, and individualbusinesses can harmonize with this image by following the designguidelines.PROPOSAL FOR MAIN STREET ORGANIZATIONThe components for the revitalization of the study area dependlargely on the initiatives taken by the business and residentcommunity. There are many different improvements that needto take place in order for revitalization to occur: streetscapeimprovements, traffic flow improvements, parking improvements,pedestrian improvements, façade design improvements, gatewayimprovements, and improvements to help retain and attractbusiness to the area.Use of the National Main Street Center’s Four Point Approachcan help to organize the revitalization effort and coordinate manyof these improvements making all the elements of the plan cometogether. The “Four Point Approach” is conceptual methodologythat many communities have successfully used as the templatefor their downtown revitalization. It includes Organization, Design,Promotion and Economic Restructuring.MAIN STREET APPROACH• OrganizationBuilding consensus and cooperation among the manygroups and individuals who have a role in the revitalizationprocess.• DesignEnhancing the physical appearance of the commercialdistrict by rehabilitating historic buildings and developingsensitive design management systems.AREAIDENTITYPROPOSAL FOR MAIN STREET ORGANIZATION
  24. 24. Aronimink Station Area Plan25• PromotionMarketing the traditional commercial district’s assets tocustomers, potential investors, new businesses, localcitizens and visitors.• Economic RestructuringStrengthening the district’s existing economic base whilefinding ways to expand it to meet new opportunities.There is a highly detailed and structured series of training sessions,workbooks, videos and slide shows for the Main Street Approachwhich show members of the community how to do downtownrevitalization for themselves and sustain the effort into the future.The Pennsylvania Downtown Center is an independent statewidenon-profit organization which provides this training and othertechnical assistance and can help the Aronimink Station areacommunity get going with the revitalization process.“PDC is obligated by its agreement with the Commonwealth toprovide certain outreach and preliminary assessment services toany community contemplating a downtown revitalization program.Beyond these initial introductory and community assessmentservices, PDC must charge a fee for services such as visioning,planning, market area assessment, etc. Members of PDC receive asignificant discount for these services. If a community is fortunateenough to be accepted into the Commonwealth’s Main StreetProgram, the services provided by PDC to the Main Street programparticipant are free for the duration of the time the community is inthe program - normally for five years” (padowntown.org FAQ).AREAIDENTITYPROPOSAL FOR MAIN STREET ORGANIZATION
  25. 25. 26Aronimink Station Area PlanGATEWAYSThe intersections on Burmont Road at State Road and at FerneBoulevard have been designated as the gateways for the AroniminkStation area. These gateways will serve as clear entry points for thearea and will help develop the image of the Aronimink Station areaas a downtown. Welcome signs and flower beds should be includedat both gateways.Currently, the intersection of Burmont and State is not pedestrianfriendly. This intersection is confusing for motorists as well aspedestrians with several traffic lights and potential areas forpedestrians to cross the street. Street signs at this intersectionare too small or nonexistent, the existing pedestrian crosswalksare faded and need to be repainted, and additional crosswalksneed to be created. There is a strip of neighborhood commercialdevelopment on the western end of the intersection on State Road.This commercial strip is not easily accessible to pedestrians. Also,there is a billboard above this commercial strip. The BerrodinBuilding is the most prominent feature of this intersection. It has ablank wall facing State Road that is not very aesthetically pleasingand there is very little landscaping in this area.This rendering shows the changes to be made at the Burmont andState gateway, also illustrated in the picture below.This picture shows how this intersection can be beautified. Trees,flowers, a welcome sign, a mural, larger street signs, banners, andcrosswalks have been added.AREAIDENTITYGATEWAYS
  26. 26. Aronimink Station Area Plan27The most noticeable features of the intersection of Burmont Roadand Ferne Boulevard are the Mobil Gas Station and the WaverlyTheater.The drawing above illustrates the changes to be made at theintersection of Burmont and Ferne. Landscaping improvementsinclude the addition of a flower bed at the corner near the gasstation and the addition of the median along Ferne Boulevard.There are many historic buildings in this area, and the façadesof these buildings need to be restored. Signage should be incompliance with the design guidelines. It should not detract fromthe architecture or the overall streetscape.This picture shows how this intersection can be improved. The sizeof the signage for the Mobil Gas Station is reduced and the signabove the Waverly Bar has been removed. Electrical wires havebeen moved underground. Landscaping has been added aroundthe gas station, and a welcome sign has been placed at the corner.Crosswalks have been added.AREAIDENTITYGATEWAYS
  27. 27. 28Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSThis section of the report illustrates ideas for streetscape improve-ments in detail. The goals of these streetscape improvements areto beautify and visually unify the Aronimink Station area. The fol-lowing are descriptions of individual streetscape improvement ele-ments:BANNERS AND LAMPPOSTSMany downtown and cultural districts throughout the country usebanners on their lampposts to promote area identity, events, holi-days, and community spirit. Using these banners all along BurmontRoad and adjacent streets within the site boundaries will visuallyunify the area as well as help designate it as a downtown.The picture on the left above is an example of a banner design thatcould be used for the Aronimink Station area. The use of green andwhite in the banner is a reference to the colors of the Waverly The-ater. The design used for the banner should reflect the characterof the neighborhood. The example on the right above was foundon the internet. This banner is interesting because it identifies thearea (Downtown Wooster) as well as highlights an important eventgoing on in the area (Woosterfest). Many communities change ban-ners with the seasons or to highlight different events. Downtownbanners can serve as an appealing and relatively subtle form ofadvertisement. In the Downtown Wooster banner picture, note theattractive lamppost as well as the banner itself. Currently, the lamp-posts used in the Aronimink Station area are standard street lights.Replacing these lampposts with more decorative ones is anotherway to improve the streetscape and make the area look more likea downtown.SIGNAGECurrently, the signage for many businesses is often worn or inad-equate, whereas conspicuous and less aesthetically-appealing sig-nage, such as billboards, is prominent. Street signs are often toosmall. In general, signage improvements need to be made through-out the area so that signs are informative, tasteful, and in keepingwith the vision of this plan.LANDSCAPINGGreening this area will make it more pleasant for its users as wellas for those just passing through. Planting trees and flowers in sev-eral designated areas is recommended.STREET FURNITUREStreet furniture includes benches, lampposts and trash cans. If thisis to be an area where people gather and spend time, the additionof street furniture is a desirable amenity. In particular, it is recom-mended that street furniture such as café tables be added on theside of Ferne Boulevard next to the Waverly Theater, because thisis expected to be a major gathering point.AREAIDENTITYSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS
  28. 28. Aronimink Station Area Plan29CONTINUITYTo create a coherent and distinct identity for the area, gaps andedges need to be transformed. In some cases, this means wideningthe sidewalks so that sidewalk widths are consistent along a givencorridor. Another recommendation made is to add short walls atthe edges of parking lots and other areas with large amounts ofpavement such as gas stations. These walls will not only improvethe visual continuity of the site, they will improve traffic flow andmake the environment more pedestrian friendly.UNDERGROUND ELECTRIC WIRESCurrently, an abundance of electrical wires mar the landscape ofthe Aronimink Station area. Many of these wires can go under-ground. This is a long-term project, but many municipalities haveundertaken this process as a part of other big infrastructure im-provements.SECTIONSThe following pages show section drawings of the current andfuture streetscape, and the portion of the site plan each sectiondrawing refers to. There are ten sections, each of which is slightlydifferent.AREAIDENTITYSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS
  29. 29. 30Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #1: BURMONT ROADDefinition: Neighborhood retail storefronts in the Neighborhood Retail AreaImprovementss:1. Bury utility lines underground2. Replace lampposts and add banners3. Regulate commercial signage4. Plant trees5. Construct low walls to beautify the edge of parking lotsBEFOREAFTERBROTHERS AREA
  30. 30. Aronimink Station Area Plan31SECTION DRAWING #2: BURMONT ROADDefinition: Neighborhood retail storefronts in the Neighborhood Retail AreaImprovements:1. Bury utility lines underground2. Replace lampposts and add banners3. Regulate commercial signage4. Plant treesBEFOREAFTERSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYRITE AID AREA
  31. 31. 32Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #3: BURMONT ROADDefinition: Commercial land uses in the Neighborhood Retail AreaImprovements:1. Widen sidewalks2. Bury utility lines underground3. Add banners4. Plant trees5. Install flower beds to divide public and private realmsBEFOREAFTERAREA NEAR 740 BURMONT ROAD
  32. 32. Aronimink Station Area Plan33STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #4: BURMONT ROADDefinition: Commercial land uses in the Office AreaImprovements:1. Widen sidewalks2. Bury utility lines underground3. Add banners4. Regulate commercial signage5. Construct low walls to beautify the edge of parking lotsBEFOREAFTERBERRODIN AND EXXON
  33. 33. 34Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #5: FERNE BOULEVARDDefinition: Neighborhood retail storefronts in the Historic AreaImprovements:1. Widen sidewalks and improve street furniture2. Install landscaped median on Ferne Boulevard3. Bury utility lines underground4. Replace lampposts and add banners5. Regulate commercial signage6. Plant treesBEFOREAFTER
  34. 34. Aronimink Station Area Plan35STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #6: MORGAN AVENUEDefinition: Neighborhood retail storefronts in the Neighborhood Retail AreaImprovements:1. Widen sidewalks2. Bury utility lines underground3. Replace lampposts and add banners4. Regulate commercial signage5. Plant trees6. Construct low walls to beautify the edge of parking lotsBEFOREAFTER
  35. 35. 36Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #7: MORGAN AVENUEDefinition: Neighborhood retail storefronts in the Neighborhood Retail AreaImprovements:1. Widen sidewalks2. Bury utility lines underground3. Replace lampposts and add banners4. Regulate commercial signage5. Plant trees6. Construct low walls to beautify the edge of parking lotsBEFOREAFTER
  36. 36. Aronimink Station Area Plan37STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #8: STATE ROADDefinition: Commercial land uses in the Office AreaImprovements:1. Bury utility lines underground2. Add banners3. Regulate commercial signage4. Plant trees5. Construct low walls to beautify the edge of gas stationBEFOREAFTEREXXON AND OFFICES
  37. 37. 38Aronimink Station Area PlanSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYSECTION DRAWING #9: STATE ROADDefinition: Commercial land uses in the Office AreaImprovements:1. Bury utility lines underground2. Add banners3. Regulate commercial signage4. Plant trees5. Construct low walls to beautify the edge of parking lotsBEFOREAFTERPEPPY’S AUTOMOTIVE AND NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL
  38. 38. Aronimink Station Area Plan39SECTION DRAWING #10: WOODLAND AVENUEDefinition: Neighborhood retail storefronts in the Historic AreaImprovements:1. Bury utility lines underground2. Replace lampposts and add banners3. Regulate commercial signage4. Plant treesBEFOREAFTERSTREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTSAREAIDENTITYAPARTMENTS AND NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL
  39. 39. 40Aronimink Station Area PlanDESIGN GUIDELINESAdopting design guidelines will aid in revitalizing the AroniminkStation area. The purpose of the guidelines is to improve theaesthetic appearance of the commercial district and to preserveits historic character. These guidelines should be more detailedin the future, so they can be used by individual business ownersto update their businesses to be consistent with the vision of theAronimink Station Area Plan.As illustrated in the picture above, elements of the designguidelines include signage, storefront, façade, sidewalk, setback,landscaping, historic character, and streetscape improvementrecommendations. The Main Street Organization should work witha consultant to delineate guidelines that reflect their view for thearea.After its adoption, it is recommended that the Main StreetOrganization provide incentives for compliance. These incentivescould include grants or tax relief from the state or federalgovernment – once a Main Street Organization is established, thesefunds should become more readily available. Also, the organizationmight be abke to recruit a volunteer designer that would providenew store owners with a free design consultation to improve facadeand design signage system. They can also reduce contributions ofbusiness owners that comply with guidelines. In the early stages,compliance may be optional but in the long run should becomemandatory.SIGNAGEThe design and placement of signage can have a major effect on thelook and feel of a commercial district. Signage should complementrather than detract from the architecture of an individual andthe overall streetscape. It can reflect the unique character of aparticular business, but should also harmonize with the overalldowntown character of the commercial district. Signage shouldbe clearly visible and informative to both pedestrians and peopledriving by.DESIGN GUIDELINESAREAIDENTITY
  40. 40. Aronimink Station Area Plan41The photo on the previous page is an example of good signage fromthe main street district in Ambler, Pennsylvania. It complementsthe historic architecture, is well-maintained, and is pleasant to theeye – not garish or overdone.This is the building at the southeast corner of the intersection ofBurmont Road and Woodland Avenue. There is a business at thiscorner, but there is no visible signage for the business. For a vibrantdowntown, all businesses should be clearly and tastefully labeled.This storefront has too many signs, and the signs detract from thehistoric character of the architecture. The yellow sign above thedoor calls attention to itself at the expense of the identity of theneighborhood as a whole. Signage should take into account thecharacter of the architecture and should not clash with the signagefor other buildings on the same block.Advertisements should be kept to a minimum, whether they areDESIGN GUIDELINESAREAIDENTITY
  41. 41. 42Aronimink Station Area Planadvertisements for a business itself or advertisements for theproducts it sells.Advertisements such as billboards are inappropriate for this areabecause they are out of scale with the pedestrian environment tobe emphasized in this area.These guidelines apply to all businesses in the area, regardless ofthe use of the building. Even auto-oriented businesses such as gasstations should cooperate to enhance the aesthetics of the area.Signs should only be large enough to be clearly visible to pedestriansand those driving nearby.STOREFRONTSBusiness owners should be mindful of the aesthetic appearance ofall parts of their storefront, including the entrance, doorways, displaywindows, awnings, signage, landscaping, and architectural elementssuch as the historic character of the building. Storefronts shouldbe complementary to adjacent storefronts in their appearance.A storefront should reflect the personality and type of businessinside.FAÇADESMany façades in the Aronimink Station area appear neglected. Forexample, the photo above on the left is from the upper façade of abuilding on Ferne Boulevard. This building has beautiful architecturalfeatures, such as these mosaics, that should be restored to becausethey reflect the historic character of the neighborhood.In general, building façades should be continually maintained,including cleaning, painting, and restoring wherever necessary.Blank walls with no discernible architectural features can be a greatplace for a mural. Mural projects are a way to get the communityinvolved, can reflect the character of a neighborhood, and addvibrancy to the district’s atmosphere.SIDEWALKSCurrently, sidewalk widths vary from three feet to ten feet. Mostsidewalks in this area should be six to seven feet wide, with theexception of Ferne Boulevard, where ten feet sidewalks will bemaintained, and Morgan Avenue, where sidewalk widths will beincreased significantly from three feet wide to eleven feet wide.The purpose of increasing sidewalk widths is twofold. By makingsure the sidewalk along a particular strip is the same width,visual continuity is improved. Also, wider sidewalks accommodatepedestrian traffic better.SETBACKSIt is recommended that all buildings in the Aronimink Stationarea be easily accessible to pedestrians. Business owners whosebusinesses are in buildings with an auto-oriented setback – thosewith a parking lot in front of the entrance – should make a specialeffort to make sure their business is connected to the main networkof sidewalks by providing clearly marked sidewalks and crosswalkson their property.AREAIDENTITYDESIGN GUIDELINES
  42. 42. Aronimink Station Area Plan43BUILDING HEIGHTIt is recommended that no buildings greater than five stories beconstructed in the area. The ideal building height is two to fourstories.LANDSCAPINGThe Aronimink Station area has very little greenery. It isrecommended that more trees, flowers, and shrubs be planted.Landscaping should be carefully placed – it should not obstruct theview of façade details or signage. A desirable outcome of increasedlandscaping is that it can often act as a buffer between pedestriansand cars, thus making the area more pedestrian friendly.STREETSCAPEThe addition of benches, trash cans, and decorative lamppostscan improve the streetscape in the Aronimink Station area. Streetfurniture should be of a consistent design throughout the area.AREAIDENTITYDESIGN GUIDELINES
  43. 43. 44Aronimink Station Area PlanTRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENTSPhysical enhancements and improvements to Burmont Road, FernBoulevard, Woodland Boulevard and Morgan Avenue are necessaryfortheplan’svisiontobecomeareality.Theseenhancementsincludechanging the direction of Morgan Ave, widening the sidewalks,identifying curb cuts, reconfiguring existing parking lots, maximizingthe number of parking spaces and creating clear pedestrianconnections throughout the site linking both Gateways. The goal ofthe new design is to use the streets more efficiently and encouragesafe driving. It establishes connectivity that can serve to physicallyenhance and improve the pedestrian experience. These proposedstreet treatments would encourage safe travel by all modes andwould better support neighboring land uses.TRAFFIC FLOW IMPROVEMENTSThe maps above and on the top right show traffic flow improvement suggestions.The aim of thetraffic study wasto identify specificand generalproblems thatimpact the trafficflow and patternsof the AroniminkStation Area.Hourly trafficvolume analysisand manual traffic counts of the four main roads, Burmont Road,Ferne Boulevard, Woodland and Morgan Avenue were recordedand performed. The results showed that traffic counts for rushand non-rush hours at the three main intersections along BurmontRoad were relatively close in numbers signifying that Burmont Roadis constantly used at all hours of the day and therefore determiningthe level of service to be between C and D.Safety conditions and level of service for the roadways within thestudy area need improvements. The current traffic volume is highand it is projected to increase with further development along thiscorridor. After conducting the traffic study, recommendationswere developed for the identified deficiencies. These will providea significant upgrade and improvement of the traffic flow throughthis area. The improvements extend from the Northwest Gateway,the intersection of Burmont and State Road, to the SoutheastGateway, the intersection of Burmont Road and Ferne Boulevard.Improvements common to all these areas include reduction of thespeed limit to 25 miles per hour along with signage to indicate thisnew limit, limitation of truck delivery times, and the synchronizationof traffic signals within each of the three areas.TRANSPORTATIONTRAFFIC FLOW IMPROVEMENTS
  44. 44. Aronimink Station Area Plan45PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTSThefollowingpedestrianimprovementsneedtobemadethroughoutthe site. Suggestions of the plan are as follows:• Repair and widen sidewalks• Align offset sidewalks to provide a continuous pathbetween points• Create small plazas at intersections to accentuate thepedestrian environment and increaseGreenery• Repaint all street crossings and make them wider• Create pedestrian circles by connecting adjacent streetcrossings• Place visible crossing signsIncreased coordination between all stakeholders will help to keepthe sidewalks clean and free of obstructions. Formation of a treeboard or committee under the new community association can helpto improve and maintain landscaping and a town watch committeecan help to ensure safe pedestrian traffic in the evening.The final design includes sidewalks ranging in width from eightto fifteen feet, depending on adjacent land use, street trees,pedestrian scale lighting, bicycle lanes and on-street parking.Another improvement to the pedestrian environment will includethe reduction of curb cuts throughout the site by reducing the sizeof entrances and exits for vehicle movements into parking lots, toenhance pedestrian flow in the area. Specific recommendations foreach gateway and the central area are given below.Area-specific improvements are as follows:NORTHWEST GATEWAY• Add a left hand turning signal from State Road to BurmontRoad• Implement a no left hand turn onto Belfield Avenue• Synchronize traffic signals with one another• Add two stop signs at the corner of Childs Road andBurmont RoadCENTRAL AREA• Request a new assessment to identify the level of serviceand interchanges of the roads• Add traffic signals for right or left hand turns for all roads• Synchronize traffic signals with one anotherSOUTHWEST GATEWAY• Increase perception of safety at the trolley stop by addingattractive crossing warning devices• Enhance characteristics by installing appropriate signage• Replace the traffic light above the trolley tracks with amodern and more reliable device• Synchronize traffic light in front of Mobil gas servicestation with light above the trolley tracks• Add traffic signals for right or left hand turns for all roads• Reduce the size of the entrance of the Mobil gas servicestation• Build a median on Ferne Boulevard, to reduce the overalldelay to motor vehicles that would otherwise have to stopfor an interval in order to allow a pedestrian to cross theentire length.TRANSPORTATIONPEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS
  45. 45. 46Aronimink Station Area PlanThe maps above show the various pedestrian improvements recommended in this plan.NORTHWEST GATEWAY• Add a new street crossing from the island across the ExxonGas Station to the west side of Burmont Road next to theBerrodin building• Add electric crossing lights with handicap signagecapabilities• Extend the sidewalk curbed end in front of the Berrodinbuilding by thirty feet• Add a street crossing from the new extension to BelfieldAvenueCENTRAL AREA• Add electric crossing lights with handicap signagecapabilities• Include pedestrian corridors within the Rite Aid Parking lotto increase accessibility and connection with new triangleparking lot in the alley behind the Yorkshire Court buildingSOUTHEAST GATEWAY• Paint new pedestrian crossings across the trolley tracks• Build a median on Ferne Boulevard, allowing a rest area forslower pedestrians• Extend the platform of the trolley station to the parking lotbehind the Waverly Theater• Once the platform is extended provide a pedestrian crossingbetween the parking lot and the south west post officeparking lot• Place pedestrian crossing gates before the trolley tracks atthe station and at the new pedestrian crossing between theWaverly parking and the post office parking lot• Increase perception of safety at nighttime for pedestrianactivity by investing in visual enhancements such as lightedsignage. This would help increase pedestrian traffic towardthe transit stop and promote accessibilityTRANSPORTATIONPEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS
  46. 46. Aronimink Station Area Plan47PARKING IMPROVEMENTSTo accommodate the parking needs expressed by the customersof the area, the community association will need to establish aparking management program to identify the parking issues andopportunities.Recommendations include reconfiguration of the existing parkinglots to increase the number of spaces, placement of new meters,improvement of accessibility by placing signs indicating thelocation of parking, and revision of the existing parking ordinancesto mandate well-lit and landscaped parking. Reviewing andamending parking ordinances as necessary will facilitate betterparking management strategies.Parking-lot ordinances establish landscaping requirements inparking lots. This may include regulating the amount of andwidth of the landscape area, types of plant material, plantingprocedures, and screening requirements. Parking regulationsshould also be enforced through out the site.The proposed improvements will not only maximize the useof the parking spaces available and improve accessibility tothe businesses, but improve the streetscape. Area specificimprovements are listed below.NORTHWEST GATEWAY• Negotiate and establish a shared parking agreement withBerrodin• Place seventeen meters more along Burmont Road fromYorkshire Court towards State Road• Implement new pricing policies and keep the two hour limit• Reconfigure the small parking lot at the corner of ChildsRoad and Burmont Road to increase parking spaces andallocate space for a small corner plaza• Convert the new parking spaces into short term meteredspaces using new technologiesCENTRAL AREA• Establish a shared parking agreement with the Post Officefor the southeast parking lot and the Rite Aid parking lot onBurmont Road• Reconfigure the Rite Aid parking lot to increase parkingspaces and reduce the curb cuts by minimizing the egressand ingress points to two.• Reconfigure the Post office southeast parking lot to add six20 minute parking spaces for Post Office customers andallocate space for a midsize corner plaza.• Improve accessibility to newly available parking by opening aTRANSPORTATIONPARKING IMPROVEMENTS
  47. 47. 48Aronimink Station Area Plansegment of the fence on the north side• Convert Rite Aid parking into short term metered spacesusing multi-space parking metersSOUTHEAST GATEWAY• Establish a shared parking agreement with the Citizen’sbank parking lot proprietors• Reconfigure the Citizens bank parking lot to increase parkingspaces and reduce curb cuts by minimizing the egress andingress points to two• Convert the new parking spaces into short term meteredspaces using new technologies• Convert the Citizens Bank parking spaces into short termmetered spaces• Build a multi-story parking structure to accommodate theincrease of customers and commuters, if necessaryMORGAN AVENUEThe site does not have a major node where people from theneighborhood can congregate for outdoor community activitiessuch as music performances, farmers markets, art festivals andstreet parties. By occasionally closing Morgan Avenue for suchactivities a greater sense of community can be established. Thisin turn could benefit local businesses as a result of increase foottraffic. If these activities become popular, they can be expanded toinclude Woodland Avenue.In order for these types of activities to take place, traffic flow onMorgan Avenue needs to be modified and the physical design needsto be enhanced.TRANSPORTATIONMORGAN AVENUEThe picture on the left above is the current condition of Morgan Avenue. The picture on the rightabove is from Ambler’s Main Street and incorporates many of the suggestions given here.RECOMMENDATIONS:1stChange direction of travel to minimize the traffic spilling overinto the residential roads.2ndLimit the vehicular movement on Burmont Road to right handonly turns to reduce the congestion occurring at the intersection ofBurmont Road and the trolley rail.3rdRemove the drive-thru teller window at the Prudential SavingsBank to reduce the curb cuts on this segment of Morgan Avenueand minimize the egress and ingress of vehicles.4thEnhance the physical design by widening the sidewalks and takingout the three existing meters to accommodate street furniture, newlampposts and landscaping.
  48. 48. Aronimink Station Area Plan49COMMERCIALREVITALIZATIONWAVERLY THEATERCOMMERCIAL REVITALIZATIONOne of the goals of the Aronimink Station Area Plan is to revitalizethe area’s business district. To be in keeping with the vision for thisplan, new businesses should be appropriate for main street-typedevelopment. Such businesses would generate a lot of foot trafficand make the area a lively, exciting place to be. Revitalizing thearea landmarks will also help the main street image. Gaps in thecontinuity of the business corridor, such as vacant land, should befilled in with uses more appropriate for a main street.The picture on the left above shows the three landmarks for theAronimink Station area: the Waverly Theater, Post Office, andAronimink Station. Specific improvement suggestions for thesesites are given in the narrative below. The picture on the right showsthe improvement suggestions for infilling the two large vacant lotsin the planning area.WAVERLY THEATERThe Drexel Hill community has a great asset in what was once theWaverly. The Waverly Theater was built in 1927. Since its closingin the 1980s, it has gone through a number of uses, many of whichhave been unsuccessful. A number of small town 1920s theatersacross the nation have closed over the years because although theymake enough money to operate, they don’t make enough moneyto cover capital repairs and improvements. Some towns havebeen able to restore their 1920s theaters by forming non-profitorganizations such as the Doylestown County Theater. This non-profit status allows them to receive funding from foundations, thegovernment and tax-deductible contributions to help with repairsand improvements.
  49. 49. 50Aronimink Station Area PlanThe photographs above show the Doylestown County Theater in itsoriginal form on the left, in the process of restoration in the middle,and fully restored and being utilized on the right.Ambler, using the Doylestown County Theater non-profit model wasalso able to restore its theater. Cost figures for the Ambler Theaterrestoration project are given in the table that follows. Phase I of thisproject has been completed and Phase II is currently underway.Cost of Ambler Theater RenovationPhase I(2001-2002)Buy and prepare building $400,000Façade, promenade, and lobby renovation $400,000Prepare two of three auditoriums $1,200,000Cost of Phase I $2,000,000Phase II(2003-2004)Open third theater $700,000Complete historic restoration $300,000Cost of Phase II $1,000,000Total cost of project $3,000,000The picture on the top right shows the Ambler Theater asrestored.Restoration of the Waverly Theater could draw more customers tothe area, benefit the existing businesses and increase the demandfor additional retail and dining establishments. Vacant lots alongthe Ferne Boulevard strip could be filled with businesses such asoutdoor cafes, or an ice cream parlor which would thrive on thepedestrian activity created by a theater.Improvements to support restoration of the theater and the newbusinesses to follow include:1. Parking: Redesign of the Citizen’s Bank parking lot in theback of the theater to include more spaces.2. Streetscape: The enhancement of Ferne Boulevard withnew sidewalks, street furniture (in the form of out-doorbenches, tables and chairs), and the addition of a median,to create an ideal setting for restaurants with outdoordining.COMMERCIALREVITALIZATIONWAVERLY THEATER
  50. 50. Aronimink Station Area Plan513. Landscape: The addition of trees, and flowers to enhancethe experience of pedestrians walking from the parking lotalong Ferne Boulevard towards the theater.The illustration above summarizes improvements suggested forthe Waverly Theater and its surroundings.COMMERCIALREVITALIZATIONWAVERLY THEATER
  51. 51. 52Aronimink Station Area PlanPOST OFFICEPOST OFFICEAnother structure with historic qualities is the Post Office. The PostOffice was also built around the 1920s. There is the possibility thatthe Post Office will relocate in the future. Whether the Post Officestays or goes, it is recommended that the structure be preserved.In the event that it does go, the structure could be used for acommunity center, book store, or other retail.Whatever the use, rearrangement of the parking lot is suggestedas seen in the following design, and the addition of a new greenspace or park with a small fountain and trees.The addition of a pedestrian crossing as shown above, would providea pathway from the parking lot behind the theater to this new smallpark and connect the parking lot behind the theater to the rest ofBurmont Road. The addition of trees and other landscaping shouldmake for a pleasant pedestrian experience on the way from theparking lot to the center of the main street, Burmont Road.The picture above is an example of a fountain and the type oflandscaping that can be used for the new green space adjacent tothe parking lot.COMMERCIALREVITALIZATION
  52. 52. Aronimink Station Area Plan53ARONIMINK STATIONThe Aronimink Station building is a critical anchor for the planningarea and revitalizing it and its surroundings is essential to creating avibrant main street. The station building is currently in poor conditionand it is recommended that the building be restored. It is difficult toaccess the station whether on foot, by bicycle, or by car. Accessto the station will be improved by extending the station platform byone hundred feet to the Citizen’s Bank parking lot, and by replacingthe gravel that is currently there with brick. This, along with theaddition of parking spaces throughout the planning area, will helpencourage park-and-ride transit use. Signage for the station needsto be replaced, as it is currently faded and too small. The additionof warning devices where the trolley crosses Burmont Road willimprove safety and make the area more inviting to pedestrians aswell as those in cars or on the trolley.Reconfiguring the physical design and land uses of the areaimmediately surrounding the station is also recommended. Thereis a large mound of dirt near the station that should be replaced bylandscaping consistent with the rest of the planning area. Repairservices and parking of serviced cars and tow trucks should belimited to the back of the Mobil service station. The possibilityof building a new structure for a café and newsstand should beassessed. The addition of this new structure would correspond wellwith increased traffic at the theater and would provide an additionalincentive for using the trolley.It is recommended that the Main Street Organization establishcoordination efforts with the Upper Darby Township Department ofPublic Works and SEPTA.The picture above summarizes some of the improvements that canbe made to the Aronimink Station and its surroundings. The nextpage shows photographs of the current condition of the AroniminkStation along with photographs from other areas that can be usedas a guide for making improvements.WAVERLY THEATERCOMMERCIALREVITALIZATIONARONIMINK STATION
  53. 53. 54Aronimink Station Area PlanThe photographs on in the left column are pictures of theAronimink Station. The photographs on the right are examplesfrom other communities.The picture on the top right shows a long brick platform inStrahburg, Virginia.The picture in the center right is an example from Little Rock,Arkansas that shows how facade and other physical designimprovements can be made to the Aronimink Station area.The picture on the bottom right is from the Ivy Line Railroad ofNew Hope, and shows an example of the type of landscaping thatcould be used in place of the dirt mound at the Aronimink Station.ARONIMINK STATIONCOMMERCIALREVITALIZATION
  54. 54. Aronimink Station Area Plan55VACANT LOTSCOMMERCIALREVITALIZATIONVACANT LOTS“TRIANGLE” LOTThe “Triangle” lot is located on Belfield Avenue, behind the YorkshireGarden apartments on Burmont Road. The odd, triangular shape ofthis lot gives it its name, as well as severely limiting the developmentpotential of this lot. Therefore, it is recommended this lot bedeveloped into a parking lot, which would yield between 25 and 30more parking spaces for area businesses. This lot would be well-landscaped, and would be linked through the alley to the Rite Aidparking lot. This would allow drivers and pedestrians easy accessfrom Rite Aid, as well as from Burmont Road through a driveway tobe constructed on the adjacent vacant lot.
  55. 55. 56Aronimink Station Area PlanVACANT LOTSCOMMERCIALREVITALIZATION740 BURMONT ROADGiven the size and location of the vacant lot at 740 Burmont Road, itis a prime parcel for considerable commercial development. As thesite exists presently, the Yorkshire Court apartments, a four-story,brick apartment building, is located adjacent to the east boundaryof the property. To the west of the property there are six two-story attached townhomes. These townhomes are setback fromthe sidewalk while the Yorkshire Court building fronts directly ontothe sidewalk. It is these current physical conditions that contributeconsiderably to the breakdown of the continuity of the street andcreate the gap identified in the current conditions analysis.In order to reconnect this area, and eliminate this obvious gap, It isrecommended that a new building be constructed on this parcel.This new building, shown below, like the Yorkshire Court building,would be three- or four-stories high, but would be set back fromthe street in line with the existing townhomes. This would provide avisual transition from the more continuous, street-fronting buidingsto the east, and the setback, one- and two-story buildings to thewest. The first floor of this new building would be exclusively retailspace in order to further create activity in this are and make it feelmore like the rest of the site. The remaining upper floors would beresidential, either conodminiums or apartments, whatever is mostfeasible at the time of construction.A driveway would be connected at the eastern end of the site toprovide access between Burmont Road and the “triangle” lot locateddirectly behind the Yorkshire Court building. This would providedirect vehicular access to parking for this building, in addition to theanticipated construction of less than ten parking spaces behind thisnew building off of the alley.
  56. 56. Aronimink Station Area Plan57EXISTING AND PROPOSED DEVELOPMENTEXISTING AND PROPOSED DEVELOPMENTThe table below summarizes the existing and proposed development forthe Aronimink Station area.EXISTING PROPOSEDRetail 89,000 sq. ft 96,000 sq. ft.Office 19,000 sq. ft. 19,000 sq. ft.Residential 24 new unitsParking Spaces 289 363On-street 103 135Off-street 128 183Restricted 58 45COMMERCIALREVITALIZATION
  57. 57. 58Aronimink Station Area PlanNEXT STEPSIMPLEMENTATIONNEXT STEPS FOR ORGANIZING COMMUNITY BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONINFORMANDGATHERUnderstand Main Street Approach:Read the “Getting Ready for Downtown Revitalization Manual” available on the Pennsylvania DowntownCenter’s website http://www.padowntown.org/about/program.aspSpread the word about area revitalization:Float the idea among as many circles as you can in your area. Ask:1. Do you think our downtown could benefit from a comprehensive downtown revitalization effort?(listen to and record feedback making a note of issues.)2. Would you be willing to serve on a steering committee to guide the downtown revitalization process?(Note their skills and interests)* Help potential members see how they can benefit personally from community revitalization. Getpeople excited about and committed to the vision and the planGather People: Assemble a critical mass of stakeholders who believe downtown revitalization is needed:Including: Residents, Businesses, Property owners, Civic groups, Local government officials, Non-profitorganizationsORGANIZEImplement Main Street Approach1. Start Steering Committee2. Assemble Board of Advisors3. Form other committees and establish roles and responsibilities4. Set time frame for accomplishment of tasks and assign responsibilities for specific tasksHire Professional to Do in depth market study: To asses the market for specific types of business in the areaCreate Business District Action Plan: Incorporating elements discussed in the reportAPPLYApply for Main Street Program Funding: Help and Further information about funding is available from:Pennsylvania Downtown Center http://www.padowntown.org/National Main Street Center http://www.mainstreet.org/PA Department of Community and Economic Development: Southeast Regional Officehttp://www.inventpa.com/
  58. 58. Aronimink Station Area Plan59IMPLEMENTATIONFUNDINGFUNDINGFOR OVERALL AREA REVITALIZATIONMAIN STREET PROGRAMThe Main Street Program is a funding program operated bythe Pennsylvania Department of Community and EconomicDevelopment that communities can use to implement the FourPoint Approach. This program could be used for revitalization ofthe overall site area, as a tool to foster economic growth, promoteand preserve the community center, create public/privatepartnerships, and improve quality of life for residents of the area.There are two components of the Main Street Program: The Firstis the Main Street Manager component funds a full time staffposition that coordinates the community’s revitalization activities.This position is funded partially for a period of 5 years. The secondis the Commercial Revitalization component. This componentprovides funding for the improvement projects in the communityat a 50% match for projects up to a certain limit.Eligibility:In order to be eligible for the Main Street Program there has tobe a Business District Action Plan for the area. We hope our plancan be used to support the development of that Business DistrictAction Plan.Selection Criteria:Selection is based on a number of considerations but priority isgiven to communities that have a viable central business districtwith potential for improvement a strong downtown organizationthat holds a vested interest in the projects success and a clearlocal commitment to community and economic development, andhistoric preservationFOR HISTORIC PRESERVATIONKEYSTONE HISTORIC PRESERVATION GRANTS:For Historic type projects, like the Waverly Theater, there isthe Keystone Historic Preservation Grant. It provides fundingto help with the preservation, rehabilitation, and restoration ofhistoric properties, buildings, structures, sites and objects. Thegrant requires a local match and can be applied for by localgovernments and non-profits.Both Doylestown county theater and Ambler Theater usedthe Keystone Historic Preservation Grant to help with theirrestoration. Ambler’s Keystone Grant was in the amount of$90,000 for the restoration of the architectural detail of the oldmarquee and tower.*Please see Appendix F for details on these and other sources offunding.
  59. 59. 60Aronimink Station Area PlanIMPLEMENTATIONTIMELINETIMELINE FOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVESTime Frame  Immediate Steps(3-6 months)Short Term(6-12 months)Mid Term(12-18 months)Long Term(2-5 years)Area IdentityM a i nStreet• Gather and Inform People aboutMain Street and Area Revitalization• Organize people into committeesusing the Main Street Approach• Begin fundraising efforts• Complete marketassessment, 5 yearstrategy, business districtaction plan• Apply for Main StreetProgram Funding• Revise businessdistrict action plan• Continue revisingbusiness districtaction annuallyGateways • Plant trees and flowers• Post new welcome signs• Enlarge street signs atgateway entrances• Paint mural onBerrodin buildingwall• Add crosswalksStreetscape • Allocate space for small plazas forpublic use• Widen sidewalks to beconsistent along corridors• Replace lamppostsand hang banners• Bury electricalwiresundergroundD e s i g nGuidelines• Hire volunteer or profession todevelop design guidelines• Complete design guidelinesTransportationImprovementsRoad • Implement traffic controllingmechanisms• Incorporate traffic calmingstrategies• Request a Professionalassessment to identify level ofservice and interchanges of roads• Replace old traffic lights• Add left hand turn signal atBurmont and State Road• Reduce speed limit to25mph• Limit times for truckdeliveries• Add stop signs atChilds and BurmontRoad• Build median onFerne BoulevardPedestrian • Perform In depth analysis ofpedestrian trips and destinations• Review all sidewalks and identifyproblems• Paint street crossings• Form a Town watch• Apply to PennDOT’s TownStreets and Safe Routes toSchool Program• Reduce curb cuts• Add pedestrian pathbetween Childs Roadand Burmont Road• Link allPedestrian pathsfrom gateway togatewayParking • Implement parking managementprogram• Review and amend parkingordinances and regulations• Begin share parkingdiscussions• Reconfigure existingparking lots• Add new meterson-street and off-streetMorganAvenue• Change Morgan Avenue directionof travel• Remove existing parkingmeters• Arrange forweekend closure• Extendedimprovements toWoodland Ave
  60. 60. Aronimink Station Area Plan61TIMELINEIMPLEMENTATIONTIMELINE FOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES (CONTINUED)Time Frame Immediate Steps(3-6 months)Short Term(6-12 months)Mid Term(12-18 months)Long Term(2-5 years)CommercialRevitalizationAroniminkStation• Install crossing warning devices forvehicles and pedestrians• Add pedestrian crossings over thetrolley tracks• Replace signage• Approach the owners of theAronimink Station property withnew recommendations• Remove mound of dirt andreplace with landscaping• Limit serviced cars and towtrucks to the back of thestation• Extend platform tothe Waverly TheaterParking lot• Restore the stationstructure• Build newstructure forcafé/newsstandwith outdoorseating• Add four shortterm parkingspacesPost Office • Discuss reconfiguration of the SEparking lot on Burmont Road withthe Post Office• Create small Park withfountain• Allocate 6-7 shortterm parking spacesfor Post Officecustomers• Change useto communitycenter orbookstoreWaverlyTheater• Look for a developer that has doneHistoric Theater Restoration (ex.Ambler)• Improve Parking andlandscaping• Add new pedestriancrossing connectingnew park next tothe Post office totheater parking• Restore WaverlyTheaterVacantLots• Approach the owner of thevacant lots with new proposal forredevelopment• Hold public meetingsconcerning theredevelopment of these lots• Proceedwith NewDevelopment onVacant Lots
  61. 61. 62Aronimink Station Area PlanREFERENCESREFERENCES“About the Main Street Program” websitehttp://www.mainstreet.org/About/faq.htmAccessed on 27 April, 2004.“Ambler Main Street” Websitehttp://www.amblermainstreet.org/Accessed on 23 February, 2004“California Main Street Programs, Strategies for Revitalizing”Websitehttp://www.lgc.org/freepub/PDF/Land_Use/reports/evaluating_main_street1.pdfApril 10, 2004“Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) in the Oak RidgeNational Laboratory (ORNL) Mobility and Safety of Our AgingPopulation” Websitehttp://www-cta.ornl.gov/cta/About.shtmlhttp://www-cta.ornl.gov/cta/One_Pagers/Mobility_Safety.pdfAccessed March 13, 2004“City of Boston Department of Transportation, Multi-Space ParkingMeters Pilot Program” Websitehttp://www.cityofboston.gov/transportation/multispace_meters.asp Accessed March 12, 2004“Communities of Opportunity Program” websitehttp://www.inventpa.com/default.aspx?id=320Accessed on 26 April, 2004.“Community Revitalization Program (CR)” website http://www.inventpa.com/default.aspx?id=322Accessed on 26 April, 2004.“Corn Market Street Area Action Plan” Websitehttp://www.corkcorp.ie/services/depts/cornmarketstreet_plan.pdf Accessed on Feb 26, 2004“The County Theater Story” websitehttp://www.countytheater.org/County-Story%20REVISED.htmAccessed on 26 April, 2004.DiFilippo, Thomas J. The History and Development of Upper DarbyTownship. King of Prussia, PA Second Edition 1992. UpperDarby Historical Society. Island Offset.“Downtown Ames Design Guidelines”http://www.city.ames.ia.us/housingweb/downtown%20design%20guidelines.pdf Accessed on 6 May, 2004Downtown Wooster Banner from “Weston Associates: Bannersand Bracket Systems” http://www.ckweston.com/banners.html#town. Accessed on 6 May, 2004.Duerksen, Chris. Tree Conservation Ordinances APA PlannersPress 2000Ewing, Reid. Best Development Practices (chapter: BestTransportation Practices)APA Planners Press 1996
  62. 62. Aronimink Station Area Plan63“Institute of Transportation Engineers, Intersection Design andSafety Toolbox” Websitehttp://www.ite.org/http://www.ite.org/safety/toolbox.aspAccessed March 13, 2004Institute of Transportation Engineers, Transportation PlanningHandbook, Washington D.C.: Prentice-Hall Inc 1999Main Street Program” websitehttp://www.inventpa.com/default.aspx?id=325Accessed on 26 April, 2004“North Carolina, Charlotte’s Trolley System” Websitehttp://www.charlottetrolley.org/Access on Feb 18, 2004“Oregon’s Commercial and Mixed Use Development CodeHandbook” Websitehttp://www.lcd.state.or.us/tgm/commercial_code.htmAccessed March 14, 2004“Oregon’s Guidelines for Parking Management” Websitehttp://www.lcd.state.or.us/tgm/pub/pdfs/ParkingGuide.pdfAccessed March 14, 2004“Oregon’s Neighborhood Street Design Guidelines, Guide forReducing Street Widths” Websitehttp://www.lcd.state.or.us/tgm/pub/pdfs/neigh_st.PDFAccessed March 14, 2004“Parking Management, Strategies for Efficient Use of ParkingResources” Websitehttp://www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm28.htm#_Toc42574697Accessed February 27, 2004“Pennsylvania Downtown Center: The Voice of DowntownRevitalization” website. http://www.padowntown.org/FAQAccessed on 27 April, 2004.“Seattle Department of Transportation, Station Area Planning”Website http://www.cityofseattle.net/transportation/ppmp_sap_home.htm Accessed on March 10, 2004“Seattle Department of Transportation, Light Rail Review” Websitehttp://www.scn.org/ucucsb/sap/drg000225.htmlAccessed on March 10, 2004Shapiro, John. Memorandum to Paul Phillips. Phillips PreissShapiro Associates, Inc. Design Guidelines suggestions for FortLee. January 2, 2004.“St. Croix Valley Development Design Study, Recommended UrbanDesign Standards” Website http://www.metrocouncil.org/planning/stcroixvalley/appendix_a.htmlAccessed April 2, 2004“Street Party, A Guide for Organizers” Websitehttp://www.streetsalive.net/guide.htmlAccessed on April 20, 2004REFERENCES
  63. 63. 64Aronimink Station Area PlanTown of Islip, New York. “Commercial Design Guidelines.” May1990“Upper Darby Township Official Website”http://www.upperdarby.org/home.htmlAccessed April 1, 2004“Urban Advantage” website, Used picture of fountain for PostOffice recommendations.http://www.urban-advantage.comAccessed on May 7, 2004“Urban Design Considerations for the Disable, United NationsDept of Economic and Social Affairs” Website http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/enable/designm/AD1-03.htmAccessed on April 2, 2004“Virginia Square, Sector Plan 2002” Websitehttp://www.co.arlington.va.us/cphd/planning/docs/pdf/va_sq_sp_1.pdfAccessed on March 2, 2004White, Peter. Public Transport: Its Planning Management andOperation 4thedition London: UCL Press, 2002REFERENCES
  64. 64. Aronimink Station Area Plan65MERCHANT SURVEYAronimink Station Area February 13, 2004Business Name: _______________________________________________________________1. What is the name of the commercial area your business is located in?________________________________________________________________________2. Which of the following best describes your business?Retail:Convenience store, drug store, etc.Take-out store (pizza place, deli, etc.)Restaurant, bar or cafeBook, music, art, gift or other specialty storeAntique storeAutomotive-related business (gas station, auto repair, etc.)Other retail (PLEASE SPECIFY: ______________________________________________)Other:Personal service establishment (dry cleaner, laundry, hair salon, travel agency, etc.)Financial service establishment (bank, insurance, tax, real estate, etc.)Other service establishment (contractor, landscaper, professional office, etc.)Medical, dental or counseling officeOther (PLEASE SPECIFY: __________________________________________________)3. Do you own or rent the building in which your business is located?OwnRent4. How long has your business been operating in this location? _______ yearsAPPENDIXAMERCHANT SURVEY
  65. 65. 66Aronimink Station Area Plan5. In what community do you live?___ Upper Darby___ Elsewhere: _________________________6. Including yourself, how many employees work in your business?Full-time: _____ Part-time: _____7. How often do you and your employees generally park in each of the following locations?Everyday Sometimes Rarely NeverUsually walkMetered street spaceSide streetsMunicipal parking lotPrivate (store/office) parking lotsOther: _________________________________8. Please estimate the percentage of your customers that arrive by:Walking _____ %Driving _____ %Trolley _____ %Other (PLEASE SPECIFY:______________________) _____ %100%9. Please estimate the percentage of your customers that come from:0 to 0.5 mile _____ %0.5 to 1 mile _____ %1 to 2 miles _____ %2 to 5 miles _____ %5+ miles _____ %Other (PLEASE SPECIFY:______________________) _____ %100%APPENDIXAMERCHANT SURVEY
  66. 66. Aronimink Station Area Plan6710. Over the past five years, have you noticed an increase or decrease in the number of your customers who are from areas farther away orcloser by:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________11. In your opinion, what is the main reason for any change in patronage you described above?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________12. Why did your business locate in this area?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________13. Do you plan any changes in the next five years? (CHECK ALL THAT APPLY)Expand in current locationRelocate in areaDecrease business size, volumeStorefront or sign improvementsCloseNo changes plannedOther: ___________________________________________________________________14. In your opinion, what types of stores and other businesses (existing and new) do you think would do well in your business district?_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________APPENDIXAMERCHANT SURVEY
  67. 67. 68Aronimink Station Area PlanAPPENDIXAMERCHANT SURVEY15. How has the business district changed in the past five years? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________16. What do you like best about the business district?____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________17. What do you like least about the business district?____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________18. If you could change one thing about the Township’s zoning and land use regulations related to your business, what would it be? (WRITE INBELOW)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
  68. 68. Aronimink Station Area Plan69APPENDIXBDOWNTOWN ACTION PLANDOWNTOWN ACTION PLAN ELEMENTS BASED ONTHE FOUR POINT APPROACH OF THE NATIONAL MAIN STREET CENTERDesign Promotion Organization Economic RestructuringEnhancing the physicalappearance of thecentral business districtMarketing the uniquecharacteristics toshoppers, investors,newbusinesses, tourists,youth and othersBuilding consensus andcooperation among thegroups that play a role indowntown and providingthe necessary resourcesStrengthening anddiversifying theeconomic base of thecentral business districtBuildingsPhysical Improvements• Streetscape• Banners• Signage• Seasonal Decorations• Public AmenitiesPlanning/ZoningParking/TransportationVisual MerchandisingGraphic ElementsGeneral Image• “Top-Of Mind” Ads• Image Events• Media Relations• Collateral MaterialsSpecial Events• Fairs, Festivals• Parades• Craft Shows• Heritage Events• Holiday EventsRetail Promotions• Cooperative Ads• Sidewalks Sales• Cross-Retail Promo• Niche Retail Ads• Coupon Programs• Niche Retail Ads• Coupon ProgramsPartnershipsVolunteer DevelopmentCommunications• Newsletters• Web-Sites• Annual ReportsFunding• Government Grant-Writing• Fundraising Events• Membership• Improvement Districts• Corporate Contributions• Foundation ContributionsBusiness RetentionBusiness RecruitmentNew Economic UsesTrade Area Information• Trade Area Studies• Business Inventory• Property InventoryFinancial Incentive• Grant Programs• Loan Programs• Tax Incentives
  69. 69. 70Aronimink Station Area PlanAPPENDIXCAMBLER CASE STUDYAMBLER CASE STUDYAmbler Main Street is a non-profit organization that has done a great deal to revitalize the Ambler area. It started in 1992 with a groupof volunteers and had similar objectives to those of the Aronimink Station Area Plan. Ambler Main Street helps to:• Restore and reuse old buildings• Improve existing businesses and recruit new ones• Create an attractive thriving “downtown” for the entire Ambler area• Host festivals and events in townToday Ambler Main Street has over 100 volunteers and has had many successes including a façade grant program which provides areabusinesses with grants to re-paint their storefronts and to install new signs and awnings. Ambler Main Street was also able to obtaingrant money for redesigning/refurbishing their east and west entrances, and for upgrading all their traffic signals.
  70. 70. Aronimink Station Area Plan71APPENDIXDADDITIONAL TRANSPORTATION INFORMATIONLand Use Minimum Required Number of SpacesBusiness and Commercial UsesGeneral Business, Commercial and Retail 1 per 250 sq. ft.Automobile Service Stations 2 per service stall, plus 1 per employeeMedical and Dental Offices 3 per exam room, plus 1 per employeeOffice and Service Buildings 1 per 250 sq. ft.Restaurants, Taverns 1 per 3 seats, plus 1 per employee, plus 5 with carryoutBowling Alleys 5 per alley, plus requirements for bar, restaurant, etc.Theaters and Auditoriums 1 per 4 seatsIndustrial UsesOffice Area 1 per 250 sq. ft.Warehouse and Storage Area 1 per 1000 sq. ft.Active Manufacturing Area 1 per employee, or 1 per 650 sq. ft. (whichever is greater)Speculative Area 1 per 550 sq. ft.Cartage, Parcel Delivery, Freight Terminal 0.5 per employee on maximum shift, plus 1 per vehicleResidential and Lodging UsesHotel and Motel 1 per unit, plus 1 per employee, plus 2Boarding and Lodging Houses 1 per employee, plus 1 per tenantSingle-Family Detached Housing 3 per dwellingMulti-Family and other Residential1 bedroom unit 2.25 spaces2 bedroom unit 2.50 spaces3 bedroom unit 2.75 spaces4 bedroom unit 3.0 spaceswith den or similar room add 0.25 spacesOther UsesHigh Schools 1 per 7 studentsElementary, Nursery, Junior High Schools 1 per full-time employeeHospitals 1 per 3 beds, plus 0.5 per employee, plus 1 per doctorChurches and Temples 1 per 4 seats, or 1 per 72 linear inches of seating spacePrivate Clubs and Lodges 1 per 3 persons, based on design capacity of seatingAccessible Parking RequirementsTotal SpacesRequiredMinimum Number ofAccessible Spaces1 to 20 121 to 50 251 to 75 376 to 100 4101 to 150 5151 to 200 6201 to 300 7301 to 400 8401 to 500 9501 to 1000 2% of totalFunding Programs for Transportation ImprovementsHOME TOWN STREETS and SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM PennDOTGENERAL INFORMATIONhttp://www.dot.state.pa.us/penndot/Bureaus/CPDM/Prod/Saferoute.nsfUnder Governor Rendell’s proposed 2004-05 budget, funds from a voter-approved bond issue would be distributed among three areas over four years:$330 million for parks, open space and farmland.$300 million for environmental cleanup.$170 million to revitalize older communities.Pennsylvania will pursue a four-year program of renewing HometownStreets and enhancing Safe Routes to Schools in communities across theCommonwealth as part of the Governor’s Quality-of-Life Initiatives under theGrowing Greener Program.Standard Parking Space Requirements
  71. 71. 72Aronimink Station Area PlanPROGRAM DESCRIPTIONThis program is intended to improve the quality of life in our communities. TheDepartment of Transportation (PennDOT) recognizes that the streets that runthrough the centers of our cities and towns provide vital connections. Sprucingup these streets will bring people back to our town centers and promote healthyliving. PennDOT can also contribute to the safety of our children by makingimprovements to the routes children take to school. This program has twoprimary objectives:• To encourage the reinvestment in and redevelopment of ourdowntowns; and• To establish, where feasible, safe walking routes for our children tocommute to school and to promote healthy living.INTERAGENCY COORDINATIONThis program will be managed by PennDOT. However, other agencies havemade and will make valuable contributions to community revitalization. Agencycollaboration and coordination for these projects is critical to our collectivesuccess. The following agencies will play a vital role in this program:• Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) and Rural PlanningOrganizations (RPOs)• Department of Community and Economic Development• Department of Conservation and Natural Resources• Department of Education• Federal Highway AdministrationIt is PennDOTs intent to have active participation of these agencies in thisprogram.ELIGIBLE ACTIVITIESHome Town StreetsThe Home Town Streets program will include a variety of streetscapeimprovements that are vital to reestablishing our downtown and commercialcenters. These projects will include activities undertaken within a defined“downtown” area that collectively enhance that environment and promotepositive interactions with people in the area. Projects may include sidewalkimprovements, planters, benches, street lighting, pedestrian crossings, transitbus shelters, traffic calming, bicycle amenities, kiosks, signage and other visualelements. This program will not fund costs related to buildings or their facadesor personnel costs related to a Main Street manager.Improvements such as general street paving and storm water managementstructures will normally need to seek other avenues of funding. Traffic signalsare not intended to be funded by this program. However, in some cases, itmay be appropriate to combine these types of improvements in a Home TownStreets project with other funding.Safe Routes to SchoolThis program is designed to work with both school districts and pedestrian andbicycle safety advocates to make physical improvements that promote safewalking and biking passages to our schools. Collectively, these efforts wouldsave on school busing costs and promote a healthy lifestyle for our children. Inaddition, some funding may be used for pedestrian education efforts. Examplesof these types of improvements include: sidewalks, crosswalks, bike lanes ortrails, traffic diversion improvements, curb extensions, traffic circles and raisedmedian islands.MATCHING FUNDSThis program utilizes federal funds. There is a matching funding requirementassociated with their use. The match is 20% of the total project costs. Sourcesof this match may be, but are not limited to, the following:• Community Development Block Grant Program funding;• State grants;• Private contributions;• Pennsylvania Infrastructure Bank Loans;• Local funds.Funding from other state agencies will be subject to any and all limitationsimposed by the source of such funds.CANDIDATE PROJECTSAPPENDIXDADDITIONAL TRANSPORTATION INFORMATIONAPPENDIXDADDITIONAL TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION

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