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Gpd brs-4-conceptframework, method and guidelines-22-2-11

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Gpd brs-4-conceptframework, method and guidelines-22-2-11

  1. 1. Good Practices: Tropical Fruits, Livelihood & Conservation Concept, method and case studies Bhuwon Sthapit Bioversity International
  2. 2. Introduction-TFTGR Project Project Title: Conservation GEF Implementing Agency: and Sustainable Use of UNEP Cultivated and Wild Tropical Fruit Diversity: Promoting Sustainable Livelihood, Executing Agency: Food Security and Ecosystem Services India: ICAR Indonesia: ICHORD Country: India, Indonesia, Malaysia: MARDI Malaysia and Thailand Thailand: HRI, DoA Target species: Citrus, Regional: Bioversity mango, mangosteen and rambutan Duration: Jan 2009-2013 (5 yrs)
  3. 3. Tropical Fruit Tree Diversity
  4. 4. Context: Diverse production systems conserving tropical genetic resources! 1. Natural forest systems-wild species 2. Buffer zones in protected forests 3. Community forestry/economic forest 4. Home gardens 5. Semi-commercial orchards 6. Commercial orchards 7. Field gene banks
  5. 5. Conservation and Sustainable Use of Cultivated and Wild Tropical Fruit Tree Diversity: Promoting Sustainable Livelihoods, Food Security and Ecosystem Services (UNEP/GEF) Goal Improved livelihoods and food security of target beneficiaries through the conservation and use of tropical fruit tree genetic resources Immediate objective To conserve tropical fruit tree genetic resources in situ and on farm through strengthening capacity of farmers, user groups, local communities and institutions to sustainably apply good practices and secure benefits
  6. 6. IMPACT GOAL OUTCOMES x Outcome 3: Community & institutions empowered by strengthening capacity Activities Objective: Tropical fruit tree genetic resources are conserved in situ and on farm through strengthened capacity of farmers, user groups, local communities and institutions to sustainably apply good practices and secure benefits. = x Outcome 2: Stakeholde rs benefits by using method and GPD GPD Improved livelihoods and food security of target beneficiaries through the conservation and use of tropical fruit tree genetic resources Outcome 1: Diversity conserved through improved knowledge Activities Project overarching goal GPD PATHWAY: is defined as a set of ‘Key strategic actions’ or a ‘ interventions’ that TFT Project must undertake to achieve the intended ‘Outcome’. GPD must be clearly reflected or captured in the Pathways. Some pathways under particular outcome can have multiple effect or can also directly support other outcome areas.
  7. 7. What is good practice?
  8. 8. What are good practices?  Good practices are practices that work towards the achievement of certain objectives under certain condition and context  It can be a process, a method or approach, a technique, an institutional arrangement or a combination of any of these.  Good practice works when a set of practice assembled together under certain situation (Sajise, 2005).
  9. 9. Definition -Good practice A good practice is a system, method or process, that over time and space maintains, enhances and creates crop genetic diversity and ensures their availability to and from farmers and other actors for improved livelihoods on a sustainable basis (UNEP/GEF, 2002).
  10. 10. Impact pathway of good practices
  11. 11. Key Areas of good practices 1. Propagation methods and nursery management 2. Production and management of tropical fruit tree genetic resources 3. Linking farmers with markets (commercialization that support diversity maintenance and livelihood options) 4. Consolidating roles of communities and local institutions in management of TFTGR
  12. 12. GPD : Capitalizing farmer selection  Varieties, genotypes, or characters unique to home gardens &  How to translate such information for benefits of farming communities and consumers? Results: Community action plans
  13. 13. Baseline survey on fruits diversity with high value traits identification M Richness G New clone (M) C New clone (C) Fruit HH Site Community Malihabad, UP 4 29 0 0 6 (1) 0 1215 Pusa, Bihar 4 27 0 3 71(18)+ 10 (4) 525 Amaravati, MP 3 07 0 8 3 1 1471 Sirsi, Karantaka 4 44 5 ? 3 0 1879 Chittor, AP 3 29 0 1 12 (3) 0 1610 18 Total Selected clones are identified from seedling trees from farmer’s orchard or home gardens and registered in the name of farmer.
  14. 14. Pummelo Clone – 3 Collector No. Name of Farmers Fruit wt No. of Segment Rind thickness TSS Acidity No. of Fruit/ plant IPS - 506 Sankar Sah, Dardha, Murol Mujaffarpur, Bihar 542 g 16 10.4 mm 10.3 ° B 1.1% 198 Less seeded (8/fruit), attractive fruit with very tender and sweet segment Total 10 clones identifi ed from farmer home garden s Pummelo Clone – 4 IPS – 520 Collector No. Name of Farmers Ramnandan Yadav, Basdevpur, Darbhanga, Bihar 1641 g Fruit weight 19 No. of Segment 10.0mm Rind thickness TSS 9.0° B 1.4 % Acidity 135 No. of Fruit/ plant More edible portion with thin rind thickness and attractive fruit
  15. 15. Case study Linking farmers with markets (commercialization that support diversity maintenance and livelihood)
  16. 16. Case 1:Value addition of local products through commodity chain approach in Malaysia Rural farmers Valued added local products Income G. atroviridis Urban consumers “Commodity chain concept” Site: Bukit Gantang
  17. 17. Case 2: Value addition of mangosteen products through commodity chain approach in Thailand Rural farmers Valued added local products Income Urban consumers Garcinia mangostana “Commodity chain concept”
  18. 18. Case 3: Value addition of by-products of rambutan through commodity chain approach in Thailand Rural farmers Nephalium spp. Valued added local products Income Urban consumers “Commodity chain concept”
  19. 19. Case 4:Value addition of Garcinia cowa through value chain approach in Thailand Rural farmers Valued added local products Garcinia cowa Young leaves Income Urban consumers “Value chain concept” Local food culture Cha muang
  20. 20. Analysis: Understanding of driving forces of good practices Using sustainable livelihood framework-Thailand Impact Baseline Livelihood Assets Human •Training on value addition •Exposure visit Livelihood strategies Commercialization of local food culture Social • Organizing women groups • Strengthening cooperative Physical •Canning facilities •Cooperative shop and OTOP Financial • Saving and credits • Incentive mechanism • Link to markets Natural •Garcina young leaves •Home gardens/ SCO Outcomes Value addition of local products (canned) and marketing Income increased Awareness enhanced Diversity conserved Stakeholders benefits Partnership developed
  21. 21. What are criteria for GPD selection? • represent one target taxon (species) • At least represent one per key focus areas • Practices currently used by farmers with scope of potential spread and scale up/out • At least relevant to more than two countries • Scope of immediate impact-2-3 years? • Low cost, practical, sustainable
  22. 22. Selection criteria for regional GPD Good practices Criteria Home gardens Diversity fair Value addition of cowa Scale and scope > million land scare poor farmers, mostly concentrated in LDC and South Asia and SEA > X million population across world > Few thousands population, mostly concentrated in the KB province region; limited scope Relevance and alignment Directly supports TFT’s strategic goal, objectives and outcome and complements MDG #XX, PRS XX and national agriculture strategy XX Regardless to countries, highly relevant to enhance human, social and natural asst Direct supports all assets enhancement of livelihoods; leverage chain of economic actions Target species Integrated system enhances spp richness All species and intraspecific One spp but translated into other spp Focus areas Encompass all focus area Strengthens community capacity Market links; address all areas Immediate effect high high More time in new area Sustainability high high Policy support for driving
  23. 23. Take home message  Good practices innovated and adopted by farming communities and researchers provide immediate benefits at the community level.  Good practices that support maintenance of genetic diversity is context specific  Good practice in one context might not be the good in other context. Better understanding of driving force and enabling factors needs to be understood.  Successful intervention of good practice requires set of practices based upon holistic and sustainable livelihoods framework
  24. 24. How to disseminate the GDP and scale up? Key questions to be asked? • Whose lives we would like to change? • What is our impact group? • What is our sub-population of impact group? • What are specific production system? • What are communities, sites, and countries we could scale up?
  25. 25. Defining GPD’s Impact Group IMPACT GROUP (IG): Specific population or group upon which Bioversity’s program aims to have significant and lasting impact EXAMPLE: Farmers in managing rich biodiversity and natural resources SUB-SET POPULATION OF IG: A disaggregated group included in the IG where program strategies may need to be focused specifically. EXAMPLE: Farmers subject to natural hazards resulting from frequent climate variability ; Smallholder female HH with insecure food and nutrition security STAKEHOLDER: Any group of people who may affect (+vely or –vely) or be affected by Bioversity’s program in some way. EXAMPLE: Donors; Relevant government department/ministries; private sectors…… TARGET GROUP (TG): A group of people who are deliberately engaged in the program as a means for Bioversity to achieve impact on the intended IG. While the TG’s lives may also be favorably impacted, it is the IG and its sub set populations to whom Bioversity’S commitment is long term and focused. EXAMPLE: Local institutions that supports community based organizations and market chain (CBM or SPARC) and links with research and extension system; PGR network; NARS
  26. 26. IMPACT GROUP Rural poor and marginalized farmers, especially women, who depend primarily on TFT biodiversity and natural resources for their livelihoods. SUB-SET POPULATION 1) Farmers managing rich biodiversity and natural resources 2) Farmers dependent on rain-fed, and low external input ecosystem based agriculture 3) Farmers subject to natural hazards resulting from frequent climate variability 4) Land scarce (0.05ha) and diversity poor farmers 5) Farmers in highly food deficit areas of remote mountain ecosystem 6) Farmers living in high production potential areas.

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